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koszconma
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  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/21, 8:56 AM

    Bush picks Fox's Snow as press secretary WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Bush has picked Fox News Radio host Tony Snow as his new White House press secretary and is expected to announce the choice as early as Wednesday, a Republican official said on Tuesday night. Snow will replace Scott McClellan,... Eighteen new works by Media Arts and Sciences Assistant Professor Neri Oxman were on exhibit this summer at the Centre Pompidou in Paris as part of Creative Multiversities, an exhibition devoted to forward-looking work in the fields of architecture, design, new technologies and social innovation.Created especially for this exhibit, Oxman’s collection — titled Imaginary Beings: Mythologies of the Not Yet — were inspired by the development and shape of living organisms and reference "The Book of the Imaginary Beings" by Argentinian poet Jorge Luis Borges, a whimsical compendium of more than 100 "strange creatures" conceived through history by the human imagination.Read moreDelivering the results of BP's internal oil spill investigation last week, chief investigator Mark Bly said he found no sign that the company cut corners to save money. EMC today announced its first purpose-built, all SSD array along new PCIe server flash cards and a new software suite that can offer administrators a single view of all their flash assets across the data center. It was a tearful, televised announcement of Venezuela's vice president that broke the news of the death of Hugo Chavez, the firebrand, larger-than-life socialist who led the nation for 14 years. Vice President Nicolas Maduro is the country's interim president until an election can be held. The 58-year-old's death after a two-year cancer battle drew cheers from Venezuelan immigrants in the U.S. who hoped for change in their homeland, and tears in Caracas. A look at images of Chavez's life and reaction around the world to his death: The company announced the start of Jet City Comics, a new imprint devoted to comics and graphic novels.     Few household activities inspire more dread than reorganizing the garage. Readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific conceptsIf, as philosophers say, the world is nothing like how humans perceive it to be, what is it really like?You raise a perennially fascinating question; one where philosophy, science and the observable facts all come into play.Obviously the perception of the world of humans or any other species cannot be wholly valid and reliable – simply because that perception is both caused and limited by our bodily apparatus. Scientists assure us that there are ranges of colours and levels of sound that we cannot detect. They exist independently of our ability to perceive them. We cannot detect a still body of invisible gas; but it exists – to the extent that in certain circumstances it may even kill us. This is simply the way we have evolved; greater sensitivity would provide no survival advantage, but would carry with it some corollary drawback.Given that the existence of such undetectable phenomena is part of what the world is "really like", the world is different from how we are able to perceive and experience it. Therefore what we can perceive is not the reality of what exists but a representation; just as a photograph or a tape-recording is a representation of what it has preserved and not the real entity.Descartes, in anti-empiricist mode, provided a clear insight into this. He argued that direct observation is often deceptive; we can never be truly confident that phenomena really are as they appear. Claude Monet is said to have been heavily influenced by this when he produced his famous paintings of Rouen cathedral in different conditions of light, radically changing their appearance – but not, of course, the reality of the cathedral. Paradoxically, experiments examining the validity of eye-witness accounts always seem to support Descartes on this.Even more crucially, Kant pointed out that our senses have certain vital but limited functions: our eyes can see; our ears can hear, and so on. But they cannot do anything else (how could they; why should they?). Thus the sum of what we can perceive is the sum of what we can comprehend. However that does not mean that what we cannot perceive cannot possibly exist; on the contrary, anything else may exist, but whatever it is we can never apprehend it.Patrick McCauley, Otley, West YorksI am married to a philosopher and asked him what it is really like. He said it is really as we perceive it, as argued by the philosopher Susan Stebbing, in Philosophy and the Physicists. Neither philosophers nor physicists stop crossing bridges because they are made of atoms and are therefore not really solid. They are solid in the way ordinary people use the word, and crossable for all practical purposes.Margaret Squires, St Andrews, Fife Are there any modern works of art that will rank with the masters in 500 years time?Yes. What do we ask of artists? That they reflect their history; their own period, and their vision of the future. So I'm nominating David Hockney, for his portraiture and landscapes, and Lin Onus, who sculpted the history of abuse of native Australians and the continent, and painted the consequences.Margaret Waddy, CambridgeThe Angel of the North.Peter Lowthian, Marlow, BucksPicasso's Guernica, not least because of its historical reference.Simon Maddison, Hitchin, HertsThere will be no artists and no art in 500 years' time. All art works will have been destroyed, along with the galleries they were exhibited in. Art is a wicked, decadent wasteful pastime. If you don't believe me, talk to Michael Gove. His elegant U-turns are an artistic delight to behold.Lizzie Hill, Guildford, Surrey I don't know forex growth bot art but I've often wondered: how did the pre-Raphaelites know?Linda Mockett, Worthing, West Sussex If the UK stopped all defence expenditure tomorrow, who would be the first to attack us and why?Nobody. And just think what a change it would make to how we would all feel – £39bn a year to spend on jobs in the NHS, or on schools, student fees, welfare, employment for young people … ie making people feel valued. But why have nurses when you can have bombs?Ailsa Johnson, PenzanceIf we did not have an army, who would step in next time G4S could not meet the terms of their contract?Andreamaisie• Answer more questions on:Where is the Titanic iceberg?How many Brits are on medication? • Read more about the origins and aims of Notes & QueriesPhilosophyArtDefence policyguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Rory McIlroy has admitted he was wrong to withdraw from the Honda Classic last week, saying he now regretted his decision to stop playing. Getting insurance to pay for midwives, software as a monthly rental, apps to use in an emergency and other consumer-focused news from The New York Times.     A United Nations report released Tuesday found that thousands of schools have been damaged or converted into shelters and that many children have not attended class for two years. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid rejected a plan to keep student loan interest rates from doubling on July 1.     On July 22nd Springsteen & I a documentary created by and for Bruce Springsteen's loyal follower[...] Moreover, while a commercial light-field camera is a $400 piece of hardware, Focii relies only on a small rectangle of plastic film, printed with a unique checkerboard pattern, that can be inserted beneath the lens of an ordinary digital single-lens-reflex camera. Software does the rest.Gordon Wetzstein, a postdoc at the Media Lab and one of the paper’s co-authors, says that the new work complements the Camera Culture Group’s ongoing research on glasses-free 3-D displays. “Generating live-action content for these types of displays is very difficult,” Wetzstein says. “The future vision would be to have a completely integrated pipeline from live-action shooting to editing to display. We’re developing core technologies for that pipeline.”In 2007, Ramesh Raskar, the NEC Career Development Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences and head of the Camera Culture Group, and colleagues at Mitsubishi Electric Research showed that a plastic film with a pattern printed on it — a “mask” — and some algorithmic wizardry could produce a light-field camera whose resolution matched that of cameras that used arrays of tiny lenses, the approach adopted in today’s commercial devices. “It has taken almost six years now to show that we can actually do significantly better in resolution, not just equal,” Raskar says.Split atomsFocii represents a light field as a grid of square patches; each patch, in turn, consists of a five-by-five grid of blocks. Each block represents a different perspective on a 121-pixel patch of the light field, so Focii captures 25 perspectives in all. (A conventional 3-D system, such as those used to produce 3-D movies, captures only two perspectives; with multiperspective systems, a change in viewing angle reveals new features of an object, as it does in real life.)The key to the system is a novel way to represent the grid of patches corresponding to any given light field. In particular, Focii describes each patch as the weighted sum of a number of reference patches — or “atoms” — stored in a dictionary of roughly 5,000 patches. So instead of describing the upper left corner of a light field by specifying the individual values of all 121 pixels in each of 25 blocks, Focii simply describes it as some weighted combination of, say, atoms 796, 23 and 4,231.According to Kshitij Marwah, a graduate student in the Camera Culture Group and lead author on the new paper, the best way to understand the dictionary of atoms is through the analogy of the Fourier transform, a widely used technique for decomposing a signal into its constituent frequencies.In fact, visual images can be — and frequently are — interpreted as signals and represented as sums of frequencies. In such cases, the different frequencies can also be represented as atoms in a dictionary. Each atom simply consists of alternating bars of light and dark, with the distance between the bars representing frequency.The atoms in the Camera Culture Group researchers’ dictionary are similar but much more complex. Each atom is itself a five-by-five grid of 121-pixel blocks. Each block consists of arbitrary-seeming combinations of color: The blocks in one atom might all be green in the upper left corner and red in the lower right, with lines at slightly different angles separating the regions of color; the blocks of another atom might all feature slightly different-size blobs of yellow invading a region of blue.Behind the maskIn building their dictionary of atoms, the Camera Culture Group researchers — Marwah, Wetzstein, Raskar, and Yosuke Bando, a visiting scientist at the Media Lab — had two tools at their disposal that Joseph Fourier, working in the late 18th century, lacked: computers, and lots of real-world examples of light fields.To build their dictionary, they turned a computer loose to try out lots of different combinations of colored blobs and determine which, empirically, enabled the most efficient representation of actual light fields.Once the dictionary was built, however, they still had to calculate the optimal design of the mask they use to record light-field information — the patterned plastic film micro niche finder slip beneath the camera lens. Bando explains the principle behind mask design using, again, the analogy of Fourier transform.“If a mask has a particular frequency in the vertical direction” — say, a regular pattern of light and dark bars — “you only capture that frequency component of the image,” Bando says. “So you have no way of recovering the other frequencies. If you use frequency domain reconstruction, the mask should contain every frequency in a systematic manner.”“Think of atoms as the new frequency,” Marwah says. “In our case, we need a mask pattern that can effectively cover as many atoms as possible.”“It’s cool work,” says Kari Pulli, senior director of research at graphics-chip company Nvidia. “Especially the idea that you can take video at fairly high resolution — that’s kind of exciting.”Pulli points out, however, that assembling an image from the information captured by the mask is currently computationally intensive. Moreover, he says, the examples of light fields used to assemble the dictionary may have omitted some types of features common in the real world. “There’s still work to be done for this to be actually something that consumers would embrace,” Pulli says. The bride is an architectural designer; the groom is a musician and a creative director at a music publisher.     This Scanning Electron Microscope image shows an array of nanowires. Photo: Kristian Molhave/Opensource Handbook of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology While the appointment of Jorge Mario Bergoglio as pope has filled many in this deeply Catholic country with pride, members of the gay pride community are unsurprisingly less than enthusiastic with the Vatican's choice. Group says endorsement of no-fly zone was intended to prevent civilian casualties Computational photography is the use of clever light-gathering tricks and sophisticated algorithms to extract more information from the visual environment than traditional cameras can. The first commercial application of computational photography is the so-called light-field camera, which can measure not only the intensity of incoming light but also its angle. That information can be used to produce multiperspective 3-D images, or to refocus a shot even after it’s been captured.Existing light-field cameras, however, trade a good deal of resolution for that extra angle information: A camera with a 20-megapixel sensor, for instance, will yield a refocused image of only one megapixel.Researchers in the Camera Culture Group at MIT’s Media Lab aim to change that with a system they’re calling Focii. At this summer’s Siggraph — the major computer graphics conference — they’ll present a paper demonstrating that Focii can produce a full, 20-megapixel multiperspective 3-D image from a single exposure of a 20-megapixel sensor. Photos: M. Scott Brauer and Stuart Darsch This is part of an occasional series of features profiling academic departments at MIT. "This is a department with a very long history,” says Andrew Whittle, the head of MIT’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE). That history, dating back to the Institute’s founding, is reflected in the department’s designation as Course 1 (of the many courses of study available to MIT students). But CEE is also a department that has changed significantly over time, as reflected in its renaming 20 years ago, when environmental engineering was added to its name.That expansion is not so unusual: Many other civil engineering departments have added an environmental component in recent years. And in a way, the addition of the environment as a specific focus in the department was not such a great change from its traditional purview, Whittle says. Water supply and sewage systems, for example, always a strong component of civil engineering, necessarily involve a close understanding of the links between large manmade structures and their ecosystems. These have “always been a big issue in the civil engineering world,” says Whittle, the Edmund K. Turner Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, who has been teaching at MIT for three decades.But MIT’s approach to civil and environmental engineering, he says, is exceptionally well integrated between studies at the very largest and the very smallest scales: bridges and buildings at one end, and microbial ecosystems at the other. Unlike its peer departments elsewhere, Whittle says, CEE requires all its students to spend a year in an intensive course that tightly integrates the civil and environmental sides of the discipline.“This is the only CEE department I know of in the country that has put together a coordinated sophomore program” combining the two areas, Whittle says. This is an important addition to the curriculum, he adds: Civil engineers need to understand the environment, and those working on environmental research and restoration need to understand the engineered structures that profoundly affect their surroundings. “The core of our educational program is a really revolutionary model,” Whittle says. Since the integrated course was put together in 2005, “the response has been incredibly positive from the students … who are now totally committed to the concept.”Building a capstoneAfter that sophomore experience, the integration of the two disciplinary areas culminates for CEE’s undergraduates in their senior year, when they form teams to tackle a capstone project. While the assignment changes from year to year, it always involves aspects of both civil and environmental engineering. “Many of our undergraduate students are strongly motivated by the excitement of a capstone project,” Whittle says.For example, a recent capstone project involved the design of a hypothetical new building for the MIT campus. “They had to design a green building for this campus, with all the different factors that would go into it,” he says: not only the engineering of an innovative, energy-efficient and sustainable building, but also all aspects of its water supply, energy, sewage system and supply streams.Another capstone project involved fat-burning-furnace for southern Florida’s water management district — a project that involved weighing tradeoffs between the competing needs for sufficient clean water for major cities, including Miami, and the restoration of the Everglades, damaged by decades of land-use changes. “Those are very contradictory needs,” Whittle says, and gave the students a hands-on example of the balancing act involved in many large-scale projects.The changes in the department, says associate professor Roman Stocker, reflect “a recognition that the problem space has changed. The needs are still there in the traditional areas,” such as the building of dams, roads and water systems, he says. But the required understanding of fundamental systems has become “much broader — how these things all integrate and interact with the environment.” In Stocker’s own research, for example, “we are trying to understand the oceans from the smallest scales up. We try to understand complex systems from their basic building blocks.”Because the department’s work spans such a wide range of domains, CEE recently distilled its various programs into six specific areas of focus: smarter cities, ecosystems, coastal zone, water and energy resources, chemicals in the environment, and materials.Clearing the watersCoastal zones, for example, are an area where the two arms of the department are deeply intertwined, Whittle says — addressing issues such as climate change, rising sea levels, urbanization of coastlines and pollution of coastal waters. “These are areas where civil and environmental aspects are expressed together, and areas where we have particularly relevant strengths,” he says.Water and energy resources involve everything from understanding the environmental impacts of extracting fossil fuels and how to minimize those impacts to the development of infrastructure to harness power from wind, waves and geothermal resources. “These are areas where we have a lot of expertise,” Whittle says.CEE’s expanding focus extends beyond its undergraduate program. “The volume of research in this department has been growing very rapidly in recent years,” he says, with the number of research papers published by CEE authors — including graduate students and postdocs as well as faculty members — nearly doubling over six years. The department’s researchers, for instance, have moved into work on the creation of new materials, as well as on understanding and improving traditional materials.One example: MIT’s Concrete Sustainability Hub, an innovative program based in CEE that was launched in 2009. Drawing on partnerships with industry associations, and on faculty from three of MIT’s five schools, the program has made strides in deepening our understanding of the molecular structure of concrete, the most widely used synthetic material on Earth. It has also produced major reports analyzing the cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of concrete used in both buildings and roadways. Ongoing research aims to use these new insights to improve concrete’s strength and durability while minimizing its environmental impact. In addition to their studies of traditional materials such as steel, glass and concrete, CEE researchers are also using insights drawn from nature to create entirely new materials. Research on the molecular structure of spider silk — one of nature’s strongest materials — may lead to the synthesis of new variations of this biologically derived fiber.CEE’s environmental researchers also cover a broad swath of subject matter, looking at how life — from microbes to humans — affects the environment, and is affected by it. CEE scientists are also examining the water cycle in its entirety: how water resources are found, extracted and used, how wastewater is treated, and how waterborne contaminants spread through the environment.“It’s a growing body of work,” Whittle says, that “covers a lot of territory, and all of those areas have seen growth” in recent years.Tackling the world’s problemsThis kind of research has been a great motivator for the student population, he says: “Our students are more energized and interested by real-world problems: They really want to go out and influence the way things get done. They really want to deal with the problems of our society.”CEE offers many opportunities for that kind of engagement with the world’s problems and challenges, Whittle points out, including strong engagement in programs in Singapore (through the Singapore-MIT Alliance), Portugal (through the MIT Portugal Program), and the Middle East (through the Masdar Institute). Students are “very engaged in challenges that relate to the developing world,” Whittle says. More locally, the department is closely connected, through its research, to many other MIT departments, Whittle says. “We have lots of connections to just about every other department in the School of Engineering,” he says, with particularly close relationships with the departments of chemical, biological and mechanical engineering. CEE researchers also work closely with colleagues in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, and have ties with the School of Architecture and Planning and the MIT Sloan School of Management. “We’re very well integrated into the fabric of MIT, bringing together resources from different schools,” Whittle says.Besides the traditional PhD program, CEE now offers two professional master’s degree programs: an intensive, nine-month Master of Engineering degree, and a two-year Master of Science in Transportation, which is an interdepartmental program run by CEE.In some cases, students are the driving force behind hands-on projects. For example, MIT’s participation in an annual bridge-building competition, which pits teams of students from more than 200 institutions against each other, has been entirely student-led for the last five years. Last spring, the Institute’s team placed second overall, despite competition from teams with much greater faculty involvement. And students from CEE have won the annual MIT $100K entrepreneurship competition for the last two years.While the department engages in many different areas of research, an underlying theme that ties together the disparate threads is summed up in CEE’s mission statement, Whittle google sniper 2.0 provide human services in a sustainable way, balancing society’s need for long-term infrastructure with environmental health.”Markus Buehler, an associate professor in CEE, stresses that connection: “If you build something, whether it’s a building or a new material, it’s going to affect the environment. Everything we do in civil engineering affects the environment, and the environment affects the humans. The work we do in this department is very valuable in showing the importance of this perspective, whether it’s at the scale of an ocean, or the scale of a building, or the scale of a molecule.” SF master donated 'a few strands' of hair before his death, to join pioneering 'solar sail mission' in 2014A "few strands" of the late Arthur C Clarke's hair are due to travel on Nasa's "first ever solar sail mission into deep space".The craft will be named the Sunjammer, after the story written by Clarke in 1964 about a race in space using solar sails. "The enormous disc of sail strained at its rigging, already filled with the wind that blew between the worlds," wrote the novelist almost 50 years ago. "The immense sail was taut, its mirror surface sparkling and glittering gloriously in the Sun … Something so huge, yet so frail, was hard for the mind to grasp. And it was harder still to realise that this fragile mirror could tow him free of Earth merely by the power of the sunlight it would trap."The voyage, scheduled to launch at the end of 2014, is being organised by Celestis, which runs "memorial spaceflights" offering families the chance to send cremated remains into space (joining Clarke on board the Sunjammer would cost upwards of £8,000). Development of the solar sail has been led by Nasa, along with aerospace companies including Celestis's parent company Space Services Holdings.Charles Chafer, chief executive of Space Services Holdings, said he first met Clarke in 1982 at the UN conference in Vienna on outer space. "I was/am a lifelong fan and attribute much of my interest in space to the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey," said Chafer. "In 2000, when we were first planning a solar sail mission to deep space we approached him about donating a hair sample containing his DNA for launch. A partner at the time journeyed to Sri Lanka to his home where he obtained the sample."In a note accompanying the sample, said Chafer, Clarke wrote: "Here are a few strands, I would give you more but I don't have any to spare." The author died in 2008 at the age of 90, leaving behind more than 100 books ranging from 2001: A Space Odyssey to Rendezvous with Rama.Clarke's deep space voyage next year follows the last journey of Hunter S Thompson, whose ashes were fired from a rocket across his Colorado farm. The late Iain Banks has also expressed a wish for some of his ashes to be fired from a rocket over the Forth. So Clarke is not the first author to go beyond the bounds of Earth – although, with the Sunjammer set to journey three million kilometres towards the sun, he is likely to travel the furthest.Arthur C ClarkeScience fictionFictionSpaceNasaAlison Floodguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Florida Atlantic University announced that the GEO Group Foundation, the charitable arm of the private prison corporation, planned to withdraw a $6 million gift to name its stadium. • Smith sacked after 14 months at Broadhall Way• Captain Mark Roberts placed in temporary chargeStevenage have sacked their manager Gary Smith after Tuesday night's 2-0 defeat by struggling Bury, and handed temporary charge to the captain Mark Roberts.The defeat meant Boro had lost 14 of their past 18 games, during which they have fallen from a play-off place down to 15th in the table.Saturday's 4-0 win over promotion-chasing Sheffield United hinted at a change in the club's on-field fortunes but the loss against Bury – who went into the game bottom of the table – encouraged the club's board to act.The chairman Phil Wallace told the club's official website: "It's always difficult when you have to replace the man in charge. Gary has done his best but the performances and results over the past few months have been worrying in the extreme."After a very promising start with a new squad, we have slipped alarmingly and the board are concerned that the present management team may be unable to deliver the club's vision of increasing attendances and developing players in a winning environment."We have waited longer than most others in similar circumstances, but we cannot in all good conscience continue to watch this downward spiral and do nothing."It's time for a change and we'll see who applies for the position. Meanwhile I'm indebted to skipper Mark Roberts who will, once again, step up and take charge whilst our search takes place."Smith joined Boro in January 2012 and led the club to a play-off semi-final, where they were beaten by Sheffield United.Stevenage lost just one of their first 14 games this season but after a 4-0 defeat to Swindon in October the club have won just six of their 24 games.Roberts had a spell as player/caretaker manager last season, prior to Smith's appointment.Stevenageguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Mr. Glover, who plays the former high school football star Troy Barnes, will appear in only 5 episodes of a planned 13-episode “Community”

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/21, 8:54 AM

    “From Up on Poppy Hill” was written by Hayao Miyazaki, the renowned Japanese animator, and directed by his son Goro. Click to enlarge, and debate the strip below the line. Keith Hackett's verdict appears in Sunday's Observer and here from Monday.Competition: win an official club shirt of your choiceFor a chance to win a club shirt of your choice from the range at Kitbag.com send us your questions for You are the Ref to you.are.the.ref@observer.co.uk. The best scenario used in the new YATR strip each Sunday wins a shirt to the value of £50 from Kitbag. Terms & conditions apply.For more on the fifty year history of You Are The Ref, click here.Cardiff CityLaws of footballguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds    Bonnie Berger, professor of applied math and computer science; -- A look at economic developments and activity in major stock markets around the world Tuesday: Leaders Barcelona will have to wait at least another week to wrap up the La Liga title after Cristiano Ronaldo struck twice to lead second-placed Real Madrid to a 4-3 comeback success at home to Real Valladolid on Saturday.     The Times's Jeffrey A. Gettleman talks with citizens about their election choices and hopes for the new term. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said Sunday that President Obama's "red line" on Syria was written in "disappearing ink." "Unfortunately, the red line that the president of the United States [has] was apparently written in disappearing ink," McCain said on "Fox News Sunday." Read full article >>     Kyocera Professor of Ceramics Yet-Ming Chiang, whose research has focused on the design of advanced inorganic materials and related devices, is the winner of this year’s Innovation Award in the category of energy and the environment for his breakthroughs in battery technology. The Innovation Awards are given annually by The Economist and sponsored in part by Huawei. After becoming the youngest tenured professor in the history of the Department of Material Sciences and Engineering in 1990, Chiang achieved a breakthrough in lithium-ion batteries that led to a new generation of batteries with unprecedented power, safety and life. His research has majorly impacted the transportation sector, as the global demand for lithium-ion automotive batteries continues to grow. Chiang is a co-founder of A123, American Superconductor and his latest company, 24M Technologies, where he leads a team developing a groundbreaking design and manufacturing platform to provide high-energy rechargeable batteries at the lowest cost in the world. Currently more than 90 megawatts of installed grid-scale storage utilizes batteries with Chiang’s nanomaterials, with an additional 30 megawatts under contract. “The Economist's Innovation Awards recognize the dreamers and the doers behind the innovations that transform the world we live in,” said Tom Standage, digital editor at The forex growth bot chairman of the 29-judge panel for the Innovation Awards. “Through their vision and creativity, this year’s winners have created important products and services. Whether in household names or behind-the-scenes breakthroughs, their innovative contributions have become part of everyday life for millions of people.” Michael Pollan and Michael Moss, who have written extensively about food, demonstrate that making a simple and nutritious meal isn’t such a chore.     President Obama orders plans giving U.S. military "full capacity to act" in Libya if situation worsens but expresses several notes of caution. Talk with experts about the pros and cons of the new U.S. policy on public access bgcolor: "#121212", The visit to three African countries — Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania — has been overshadowed in part by the declining health of Nelson Mandela.     Washington Redskins coach Mike Shanahan says Robert Griffin III is "ahead of schedule" in his return from knee surgery. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on Monday ratcheted up his condemnation of the fatal stabbing of five members of a family in a Jewish settlement on Friday, calling it a "despicable act" that was "inhuman and immoral." The company is developing a television set-top box and is talking with content providers to distribute video services.     With the end of the summer driving season just around the corner, traders and investors on Monday drove gasoline prices to an eight-month low on U.S. commodities markets, providing the latest sign of pessimism about the economic recovery. Rejuvenated by improved form with his driver, Zach Johnson made a strong start to his title defense at the John Deere Classic in Silvis, Illinois as he surged into a share of the lead in Thursday's opening round.     In December, Baruch College, with no outdoor space to call its own, received permission from the city to permanently close its East 25th Street block to vehicular traffic; it has since been reconfigured into an outdoor plaza.     Release date for album and app confirmed as 11 November, as Lady Gaga promises to 'bring the music industry into a new age'Lady Gaga has announced the official pre-order and release dates for ARTPOP, her new album, and also the app through which it will be delivered to smartphones and tablets.Both album and app will be pre-orderable from 1 September, according to a post on Gaga's Facebook page, before their official release date of 11 November."Built by TechHAUS, the technological branch of HAUS OF GAGA, the app itself is a musical and visual engineering system that combines art, fashion, and technology with a new interactive worldwide community – 'the auras'," explains the post, which doesn't skimp on grand claims (or capital letters)."Altering the human experience with social media, we bring ARTculture into POP in a reverse Warholian expedition.Exploring Gaga's micro niche finder a cultural interface, the user will share in the 'adrenaline of fame; as they build and share their own projects, chat with one another, and watch in real-time on a virtual globe as ARTPOP explodes onto the physical and virtual universe at once on November 11, our 'BIG BANG!' On this day, HAUS OF GAGA venges with forte to bring the music industry into a new age: an age where art drives pop, and the artist once again is in control of the 'icon'."The album launch will be preceded by "an evening of artRave" including collaborations with photographers Inez & Vinoodh, theatre director Robert Wilson, and artists Marina Abramović and Jeff Koons.It's the app that promises to be most intriguing, though. It's the most high-profile album-as-app since Bjork's Biophilia in 2011, which was initially released for iPad as a collection of interactive sections: one per song.Gaga actually announced plans for the ARTPOP app in September 2012 on her Little Monsters website, promising fans that "the most major way to fully immerse yourself in ARTPOP is through the APP". It sounds like the creative vision for the app has remained roughly the same since then:"ARTPOP will be released as an IPAD, iPhone, mobile and computer compatible application (WORLD) that is completely interactive with chats, films for every song, extra music, content, gaga inspired games, fashion updates, magazines, and more still in the works! I will also be able to upload new things to the APP all the time, the same way i upload to twitter and LM.com."Most major music artists have an app of some kind nowadays, although in most cases a relatively simple one that pulls in social media updates and YouTube videos while pointing fans out to buy music, tickets and merchandise.Others have taken a different approach. Snoop Dogg was making $30k a week from sales of digital stickers in his Snoopify photo-sharing app in June this year, while Trey Songz was reportedly making $54k a month from sales of virtual items within his Angel Network fanclub app earlier in the year.Biophilia remains the most creatively-ambitious artist app, but also a bigger financial risk – it was rumoured to have cost more than $500k to develop, but sales figures have never been released for the iOS version. A Kickstarter campaign to raise £375k to port the app to Android and Windows 8 was cancelled 10 days in after failing to pick up steam.Lady Gaga looks to be pulling out all the stops for the ARTPOP app in order to make it the most successful artist app yet, and prove there's a business model for apps as a format for music distribution. But also to continue making the case for the album itself as a music format."An app can demand all of your senses and attention at once. That's something exciting for musicians," fat-burning-furnace Snibbe, who worked with Bjork on Biophilia, talking in October 2011."A lot of them lament the demise of the album experience due to digital distribution. But one thing about the app-album is it reclaims people's attention for an entire album."Lady Gaga will certainly have people's attention on 11 November. It remains to be seen if ARTPOP can kick off a new wave of album-as-app projects from her peers.Lady GagaAppsSmartphonesTablet computersiPhoneiPadAndroidDigital mediaStuart Dredgeguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Talks with the musicians, who went on strike on Wednesday, mainly over wage issues, broke down on Sunday evening. With the recent launch of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT News examines research with the potential to reshape medicine and health care through new scientific knowledge, novel treatments and products, better management of medical data, and improvements in health-care delivery.An online health-insurance exchange is coming to your state. How effective will it be?That is an increasingly important question in the United States. In June 2012, the Supreme Court upheld the legality of the country’s Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. The program mandates private-sector health insurance for all citizens, and provides subsidies for those who otherwise could not afford it. Insurance-plan choices will be available through exchanges, or marketplaces; most people will be able to study plans and sign up for one online. As of December, nearly 20 states have elected to run exchanges themselves; the federal government will run the exchanges in other states. And therein lies a key issue: Creating a consumer-friendly exchange is no easy task. It is hard enough to know what kinds of foods we should eat, which cars to drive, or which apps to use. Selecting an insurance plan is a far more complex decision.“Health insurance is a confusing and difficult choice,” says Jonathan Gruber, a professor of economics at MIT who specializes in health-care issues. “It’s important that people make decisions in an organized and effective market. In that way they can make the best choices, and we can ensure the best level of competition among insurers.”Gruber would know: He provided crucial modeling that helped shape both the statewide health-care plan that former Gov. Mitt Romney signed into law in Massachusetts, in 2006, and the Affordable Care Act. Gruber has also served on the board overseeing the exchange in Massachusetts — the one state, because of the 2006 law, that already has an online portal up and running. Moreover, as Gruber readily acknowledges, state-run insurance exchanges must pull off a difficult balancing act. The point of markets is google sniper 2.0 competition, but academic research shows that when people are given too many choices, they struggle to select logical options for themselves. “The tension that exchanges face,” Gruber says, “is [having] enough standardization to make choice and competition work effectively, but not so much standardization that people can’t find the plans that best fit their tastes. That’s absolutely a central tension.” To handle this challenge, policymakers and academic researchers will almost certainly have to collaborate in productive ways.Swamped by insurance choicesIndeed, plenty of research suggests that America’s existing health-care offerings are already too complex. In a 2006 survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, 73 percent of seniors, 91 percent of pharmacists, and 92 percent of doctors felt that Medicare’s prescription drug plan — Medicare Part D — was too complicated.Meanwhile, a wealth of studies in behavioral economics suggest that having too much choice is problematic for consumers; one much-cited experiment from 1995, by Columbia University business professor Sheena Iyengar, shows that consumers are far more likely to buy jam at the supermarket when presented with many fewer product choices. Iyengar and economist Emir Kamenica of the University of Chicago have shown that increasing the number of risky 401(k) plan choices available to people leads them to opt for safer plans. In the health-insurance domain, Gruber and Jason Abaluck, an economist at Yale University, published a study in the American Economic Review in 2011 showing that a large number of seniors select Medicare Part D plans that are mismatched to their needs. For one thing, seniors place too much emphasis on lower premiums, as opposed to plans that defray more out-of-pocket costs. Optimal choices, the researchers found, would make these health-insurance plans 27 percent more valuable to seniors. However, seniors were often unable to make apt decisions because, in part, they typically had more than 40 stand-alone drug plans to select from. Overall, Gruber and Abaluck concluded, “Consumers would be better off if there were less scope for choosing the wrong plan.” One solution: Metallic tiersTo combat this problem, the Massachusetts exchange and its online portal, the Health Connector, divide insurance plans into three tiers by cost: gold, silver and bronze. Consumers who know what tier they can afford can then study options at that level before deciding. In this way, the exchange organizes the options and helps winnow the range of choices for consumers to a manageable quantity. The Health Connector also aims to offer clear information about plans — “decision support,” as scholars call it — to consumers. Julia Belluz is the senior editor at The Medical Post, a contributing writer at Maclean’s magazine, and creator of the blog Science-ish, based in Toronto. Hyper-modern Japan may be peerless at dealing with earthquakes. But potential radiation has created another layer of alarm unseen in other countries recently ravaged by

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    on 2013/11/21, 8:53 AM

    The trade in vintage Oscars through publicized auctions and an underground market has become a parallel universe as competitive and bitter as the annual acting derby itself. Facts and figures for the British Open golf championship:    Mads Mikkelsen plays a teacher suspected of being a pedophile in “The Hunt,” set in a Danish village.     Nigel Evans, a deputy speaker questioned by the police on Saturday, said that the claims of rape and sexual assault were “completely false.”     With spring football beginning on campuses around the country this month, six 30-something coaches are getting their first crack at running a program. That doesn't include Willie Taggart — he'll be 37 when South Florida kicks off next fall and it will be head coaching job No. 2 for him. This Class Struggle RSS subscription has changed. To continue getting Class Struggle by Jay Mathews visit washingtonpost.com/class-struggle. Rutgers reached a $475,000 settlement agreement with its fired basketball coach, Mike Rice, agreeing to pay him for the remaining two years of his contract.     The Indiana Pacers assistant Brian Shaw said he had been hired as the coach of the Denver Nuggets.     Just before Thanksgiving 2009, my family began heating and cooling our 4,400-square-foot suburban home with geothermal energy. As I wrote in a story that appeared in Health & Science last March, we got rid of our 24-year-old oil-burning furnace and traditional air conditioning, and replaced t... BANGKOK -- Most Asian markets took cues from Wall Street on Thursday and edged higher despite serious challenges to the global economy, including Japan's struggle to contain an earthquake-spawned nuclear crisis, Portugal's unresolved financial problems and uprisings in the Middle East. Gen. James N. Mattis, the American commander in the Middle East, revealed that his recommendation included 13,600 American troops. Martha Constantine-Paton, a professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and an investigator at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT has been awarded the Society for Neuroscience’s (SfN) Mika Salpeter Lifetime Achievement Award. The award recognizes individuals with outstanding career achievements in neuroscience who have also actively promoted the professional advancement of women in neuroscience. Constantine-Paton will be recognized for her achievements during SfN’s annual meeting this October. Over the past 30 years, Constantine-Paton has established a reputation as a leading figure in the field of developmental neuroscience. In particular, her pioneering work on NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity laid the groundwork for our current understanding of how the brain becomes correctly wired in response to activity and experience. She has also mentored many students and postdocs, among them several prominent women scientists, and she is very active in promoting the career development of her junior colleagues.  “Martha’s research contributions have been extremely influential within her field, and her influence has also been felt through her exemplary record of mentoring and service,” says McGovern Institute Director Robert Desimone. “Martha’s career indeed represents a lifetime of achievement and I cannot imagine a more deserving recipient for this honor.” Art, music, engineering and steel all form part of a new festival that includes the world's first windscreen wiper and invites the public to write letters to the Angel of the NorthThe idea for a Festival of the North East, celebrating all things connected with the region, has been around for some time; the question has been finding a suitable time to hold it.The return of the Lindisfarne Gospels to Durham this summer was seen by many as the ideal moment, so a month-long inaugural festival will take place throughout June in hundreds of venues from the Tweed to the Tees.At the launch this week, Anthony Sargent, who chairs the festival as well as being general director of the Sage Gateshead music centre, described the ethos behind the new festival:It's not just about arts and culture, as a lot of festivals are; it's science, it's technologies, forex growth bot it's discoveries, it's history, it's heritage – and to get all of that range of different versions of the story of the North East into one festival in 30 days is I think amazing.Spread throughout the region will be A History of the North East in 100 Objects, inspired by Neil MacGregor's 100 objects from the British Museum.Bill Griffiths of Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums is organising the project, and hopes it will encourage people to find some of the quirkier objects in less obvious places, as well as stimulate debate about the history of creativity in the region. He said:It's very much "a" history as we won't have everybody's favourite object. All the objects demonstrate creativity or innovation in the North East and are in public collections, although there are some surprising omissions – the Bowes Museum's silver swan, for example.Included in the collection are the world's first windscreen wiper, a miners' banner at the Woodhorn Museum, Joseph's Swan's first electric light bulbs, George Stephenson's miners' lamp, a painting by Oliver Kilbourn – one of the Ashington Group of "Pitmen Painters" - and Turbinia, once the fastest ship in the world. Griffiths is refusing to release the full list until nearer the festival, but hopes the public will nominate their own alternatives.Near Redcar, where tens of thousands of people used to work in the steel works, Newcastle's Theatre Royal is organising Salamander, a celebration of all things connected to the steel industry, featuring 500 participants, an audience of around 5,000, and music, dance, visual arts, poetry, storytelling and a male voice choir of steel workers.Artist Steve Tomlinson is creating a steel bird public sculpture for the event, which will be permanently sited at Dormanstown.Northumbrian piper and composer Kathyrn Tickell is a prime mover of the festival, and its artistic adviser. She is organising One Night in Gateshead at the Sage on 14 June, which will include traditional North Eastern folk songs rearranged for the Northern Sinfonia, as well as North Eastern singers, writers, actors, dancers and musicians. Kathryn said:It's always been my vision to create a festival which celebrates the amazing creativity of North Eastern people and one with broad appeal that everybody can enjoy.In Dear Angel, artist Stevie Ronnie is encouraging people to write a letter to the Angel of the North as it celebrates its 15th birthday. The artist will collate the letters to create "a distinctive record of how we feel about this place we call home." The final artwork will be shown at Newcastle's Globe Gallery, in Durham and on Holy Island. Letters can be emailed to letters@dearangel.org or tweeted to @_dearangel.Other highlights include the requiem for the foghorn at Souter lighthouse, exhibitions and concerts commemorating the centenary of the death of suffragette Emily Davison, the Riveting Stuff project celebrating engineering achievements on Teesside, Walk On, an exhibition at Sunderland's NGCA looking at artists including Richard Long who make artworks based around walking, the reopening of the National Glass Centre at Sunderland University, and Tyne, a new play by Michael Chaplin to mark the 40th anniversary of Newcastle's Live Theatre.• A guide to the festival is here. The Lindisfarne Gospels will be the centrepiece of an exhibition at Palace Green, Durham, from 1 July to 30 September. Tickets can be ordered here.Alan Sykes Tweets hereFestivalsNewcastleSunderlandDurham UniversityAlan Sykesguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Big East football schools will get almost all of a $110 million pot in a deal that will allow seven departing basketball schools to keep the name Big East and start playing in their own conference next season, a person familiar with the negotiations says. One of the most promising new kinds of battery micro niche finder electric cars is called a lithium-air battery, which could store up to four times as much energy per pound as today’s best lithium-ion batteries. But progress has been slow: The nature of the electrochemical reactions as these batteries are charged remains poorly understood.Researchers at MIT and Sandia National Laboratories have used transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging to observe, at a molecular level, what goes on during a reaction called oxygen evolution as lithium-air batteries charge; this reaction is thought to be a bottleneck limiting further improvements to these batteries. The TEM technique could help in finding ways to make such batteries practical in the near future.The work is described in a Nano Letters paper by Robert Mitchell, who recently received a PhD in materials science and engineering from MIT; mechanical engineering PhD student Betar Gallant; Carl Thompson, the Stavros Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Yang Shao-Horn, the Gail E. Kendall Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering; and four other authors.Oxidation in actionThe new observations show, for the first time, the oxidation of lithium peroxide, the material formed during discharge in a lithium-air battery. At high charging rates, this oxidation occurs mostly at the boundary between the lithium peroxide and the carbon substrate on which it grows during discharge — in this case, multiwall carbon nanotubes used in the battery electrode. The confinement to this interface, Shao-Horn says, shows that it is the resistance of lithium peroxide to a flow of electrons that limits the charging of such batteries under practical charging conditions.An electrolyte-coated probe tip serves as the opposing electrode for removing lithium ions during charging, as electrons flow through the nanotube framework to the external circuit. During charging, the lithium peroxide particles shrink beginning at the nanotube-peroxide interface, showing that oxidation occurs where it is easiest to remove electrons. “The lithium transport can keep up,” Shao-Horn says, which indicates that electron transport could be a critical limit on charging of batteries for electric vehicles.Faster chargingIn fact, the rate of lithium peroxide oxidation in these experiments was approximately 100 times faster than the charging time for laboratory-scale lithium-air batteries, and approaches what is needed for applications. This demonstrates that if these batteries’ electron-transfer characteristics can be improved, it could allow for much faster charging while minimizing energy losses.“This provides insights into how to design the air electrode,” Shao-Horn says. “To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence that electron transport is limiting the charging.”Gallant says this finding suggests that lithium-air battery performance would improve if electrodes had a high-surface-area structure to maximize contact between lithium peroxide and the carbon required to transport electrons away during charging. The “very critical next step,” Shao-Horn says, will be to measure actual currents during charging. Her team is working with researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, some of whom were co-authors of this paper.Jie Xiao, a researcher at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who was not involved in this research, says, “This work has identified the key limiting condition, electron transport … providing a critical contribution.”Xiao adds, “This is a great example of how fundamental research can significantly improve our understanding to resolve challenges in practical devices. The information provided in this paper will benefit the rational design of the air electrode of lithium-air batteries. … This research is of high quality and will attract broad interest.”The work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation, and was performed in part at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories, a facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy. Some analysts say that the universities, locally funded but serving student bodies that are still dominated by foreigners, seem like bubbles cut off from Gulf culture and society. Today we constantly switch from one text to another: news, blogs, email, workplace documents and more. fat-burning-furnace new book by an MIT professor reveals that this is not a new practice: In the 14th century, for instance, many people maintained eclectic reading habits, consuming diverse texts in daily life.Consider Andrew Horn, the chamberlain for the city of London in the 1320s — meaning he was essentially the lawyer representing London’s interests in court against the king, who was Edward II for most of that time. The bound manuscripts in Horn’s possession, handed down to the city and preserved today, reveal a rich mixture of shorter texts: legal treatises, French-language poetry, descriptions of London and more. Perusing such diverse texts, within bound volumes, was all in a day’s reading for a well-educated person, asserts Arthur Bahr, a professor of literature at MIT. Now in his book “Fragments and Assemblages,” published by the University of Chicago Press, Bahr says we must reconstruct how medieval people compiled these bound volumes in order to best grasp how they thought and wrote.“Medieval manuscripts usually survive as fragments, and at the same time they are also very often assemblages of multiple, disparate works,” Bahr says. “The interesting literary-historical question is why specific assemblages got put together the way they did.” When we realize that individuals read this way, Bahr notes, we can see that the practice of throwing together all kinds of texts in a single bound manuscript may have influenced the composition of the most famous piece of literature of the period, Geoffrey Chaucer’s late-14th-century work “The Canterbury Tales,” a rich collection of linked stories. “The ability to see the potential of textual juxtapositions is the cultural ground out of which the Canterbury Tales springs in the late 14th century,” Bahr says. “Chaucer’s invitation to readers is a kind of interactive process of composition. He has an idea about what ordering of the tales makes sense, because he creates links between them, but he’s encouraging us to participate. We don’t think of older writing as being that radical, but it is.”Reading before the printing pressTo see why readers 700 years ago jumped between texts so much, recall that this was prior to the invention of the printing press, which was introduced in Europe in the middle of the 15th century. Before single books could be mass-produced more easily, manuscripts were copied out by hand, then bound together. This process led people to have many different types of texts bound together, rather than a single text being the entirety of a bound volume. In the case of Horn’s manuscripts, Bahr says, London’s chamberlain collected “detailed records of all the rules and legal precedents that give the city power and autonomy. But he included poetry, and bylaws for a poetic society, and a little Latin poem that doesn’t seem to go with anything else. Thinking about the literary, and being able to read in literary ways, as well as practical ways, was a skill he thought was important.” But Horn was not just throwing a bunch of texts together and expecting readers to bounce around wildly from one to another, Bahr observes. He had a deliberate method to his assemblages of texts. “Horn actually uses the construction of his books to create literary puzzles for his reader,” Bahr says. “One poem just doesn’t make sense, but if you read the poem in juxtaposition with the legal treatise that comes after, then the two pieces make sense. He’s suggesting that the law and literature are sort of the yin and the yang, you need both. And that is kind of amazing, really.” In the book, Bahr looks at additional 14th-century manuscripts that compiled works of many authors, but also reinterprets Chaucer through the lens of these reading practices. “Chaucer is able to conceive of the literary project that he undertakes in large part because those early figures created a literary culture google sniper 2.0 attuned to these sorts of textual juxtapositions within literary manuscripts,” Bahr says.Consider, Bahr adds, the Miller’s Tale, in the prologue of Chaucer’s great work. “It’s a very funny tale about a miller, his adulterous wife, and her lover,” Bahr says. “As Chaucer is getting ready to tell it, he says, [in effect], ‘If you don’t like dirty stories, just turn the page and look at something else.’ This has been taken as a joke, but it’s a serious joke, because we can turn the page, and we’re being invited to think about the effect of different textual juxtapositions. If we put these pieces in a different order, what would that do to the work as a whole?” Among other things, Bahr points out, it would lead readers to skip about more freely within “The Canterbury Tales” and, in effect, create their own distinctive versions of it.A polyglot culture“Fragments and Assemblages” has been well-received by other medievalists. James Simpson, a professor of English at Harvard University, calls it “deeply learned and technically skillful,” while Maura Nolan, a literature professor at the University of California at Berkeley, says that Bahr successfully “stitches together the divided 14th century and demonstrates that literary production during the period was an ongoing and continuous project.” Among other insights we can glean from reading medieval manuscripts, Bahr notes, is the polyglot culture that existed among learned people in the 14th century. Following the Norman conquest of England in 1066, French was the language of the aristocracy and upper bourgeoisie, and Latin was the language of the church and most of the state. “It’s interesting how multilingual these manuscripts can be,” Bahr says. We tend to think of England as having one language, but … if you were a social climber, you needed good French. You have at least a trilingual nation, and then there is Welsh, and other [regional] languages. Because Chaucer wrote in English, it’s easy to lose sight of how, even in the Middle Ages, people were still actively engaged with French and Latin.” So medieval readers browsed around a lot, read linked stories in creative ways, and lived in a diverse, even globalized intellectual milieu: plus ça change. Nostalgia, long considered a disorder, is now recognized to counteract loneliness, boredom and anxiety — making life seem more meaningful and death less frightening.     The 19-month suspension of Florida A&M University’s band, whose reputation was damaged by the death of a drum major, will be lifted.     House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who yanked embattled Rep. William J. Jefferson off a powerful tax committee last year, has decided to put him on the Homeland Security panel, aides to the Louisiana Democrat confirmed yesterday. Since the depths of the housing crisis, homeowners who owed more on their mortgage than their homes were worth had few options. That has begun to change. More homeowners are now turning to short sales, in which they sell their homes for less than what they owe in mortgage debt and the lender typically forgives the difference. Read full article >> The fifth part of London's Southbank Centre's Rest is Noise festival - that takes as its starting point Alex Ross's survey of 20th century music - focuses on music in pre-war America. Here, US conductor Marin Alsop and the Guardian's Tom Service discuss the African-American inspiration for Antonín Dvořák's New World Symphony, and key figures from the era such as black composer William Grant Still, and Duke Ellington's mentor, violinist Will Marion Cook.Cameron RobertsonLaura BartonImogen TildenTom Service Fat is no longer a four-letter word in nutrition circles, but knowing how much of it to chew -- and what kind -- can be tough. Many tech companies have called for the U.S. Congress to ease restrictions on high-skill immigration because they can't find qualified tech workers to fill open

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/21, 8:49 AM

    U.S. stocks fell last week, sending the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index to a three-month low, on growing uncertainty over European leaders' plans to halt the debt crisis and economic data that raised doubts about the strength of the economic recovery. Suspect turned informant gives new evidence to Met before parliament vote on newspaper regulationDetectives are examining an estimated 600 fresh allegations of phone-hacking incidents at Rupert Murdoch's now closed News of the World on the back of fresh evidence obtained by the Metropolitan police by a suspect turned supergrass.Further details are expected to emerge on Monday morning at the high court during a hearing relating to the existing litigation by hacking victims against Murdoch's News International (NI) – hours before MPs are due to vote on joint Labour and Liberal Democrat amendments that would introduce a backstop law to stiffen regulation of the press.Sources say Scotland Yard detectives believe they can identify as many as 600 new incidents after obtaining the phone records of an insider who is now being lined up as a crown witness. As a result of the new information, the force's Operation Weeting is recalibrating the timetable for concluding its investigation, which had been due to be completed with the conclusion of trials this year. Police now expect their work to continue into 2015.The 600 new potential litigants fall into three groups: new victims; others who sued over hacking but signed agreements with NI allowing them to sue the company again; and a third group who signed agreements potentially barring them from suing again. The indications are that there may be "some hundreds of new legal actions" from the first two groups.On Monday the high court will hear formally of at least a dozen settlements out of the 167 civil claims filed last autumn from individuals including Cherie Blair and David Beckham's father, Ted. Blair was one of 170 victims who chose to sue in the high court instead of going through the NI private scheme, which has so far accepted 254 compensation claims.More than 250 people have sued NI including Jude Law, Sienna Miller and Charlotte Church after they were told by police they were targeted by the paper but the opening of a second line of inquiry into activities at the paper will be a fresh nightmare for Murdoch and NI executives who are busy trying to rebuild the reputation of the company before a demerger of the parent company, News Corp, in June.Last month there was a fresh wave of arrests of former NoW executives, believed to have been prompted by the new evidence. Three men and three women were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to intercept telephone communications between 2005 and 2006.Information from the same supergrass also led to the arrests on Thursday of the former editor of the Sunday Mirror, Tina Weaver, and three other former colleagues were arrested on suspicion of hacking phones. On Friday, Richard Wallace, former editor of the Daily Mirror and Weaver's partner, was interviewed by police under caution as the crisis forex growth bot Mirror Group spread.So far eight former NoW staff, including former editors Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson, face charges in relation to allegations of conspiring to hack phones.The revelations come at the worst possible time for David Cameron as he prepares to battle in parliament to protect the newspaper industry from what he fears is excessive state-backed regulation of the industry. MPs and peers are due on Monday to debate legal changes designed to tighten media self-regulation and ensure it is placed on a permanent basis. Labour and the Lib Dems are hoping to defeat the Conservatives with their proposals to introduce a law to strengthen the power of a watchdog to audit the work of a reformed Press Complaints Commission.Cameron is not currently due to speak in the Commons debate, since the reforms come in the shape of amendments to the crime and courts bill. But the prime minister will face Ed Miliband across the dispatch box during a statement after the conclusion of the European council summit of EU leaders, and may yet be asked by the Speaker to make a Commons statement on why on Thursday he decided to pull the plug on all-party talks to introduce a new system of press regulation.Cameron is likely to lose, raising questions about his authority and judgment. There were still hopes that he would seek a last-minute deal. Harriet Harman, shadow culture secretary, said: "I hope that even before we get to Monday we will get that cross-party agreement." Aides to Nick Clegg said he was not planning to talk to Cameron before Monday about press regulation, saying his efforts were focused on securing as large a vote as possible amongMPs for a tough system of regulation. Clegg insisted the issue should be seen as above party politics.Ed Miliband said: "The royal charter we propose would create a new independent voluntary system of self-regulation for the press. It has a code setting out the high ethical standards of the best in British journalism, a complaints procedure which is easily accessible and fair, and real teeth to ensure protection and redress for citizens."Earlier, Cameron welcomed the move by the other parties towards accepting a royal charter, rather than passing legislation to create a new regulator. He said it was now essential that the matter was brought to a head and could no longer be allowed to "hijack" the rest of the Government's legislative programme.News International had no comment on allegations of a second hacking operation at the NoW.It said it still planned to close its compensation scheme, but would continue to consider "meritorious claims".Lisa O'CarrollPatrick WintourJosh Hallidayguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More FeedsMr. Baigent, an author of “The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail,” contended that Dan Brown had stolen his ideas, using them in “The Da Vinci Code.”     Book review by It's hard to imagine a world in which all you can micro niche finder a thought is recall it: a world in which written words do not exist and the only way to hoard knowledge is to remember. That may sound like an extravagantly imagined story by Philip K. Dick, but once upon a time, long ago, b... Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel’s “Leviathan,” set on a groundfish trawler out of New Bedford, Mass., emphasizes the brutality of fishing. Steve Kazee’s show at 54 Below featured original, mostly downbeat alt-country material, performed with his band, the Shiny Liars.     TOLEDO, Ohio -- A letter opener found in a priest's room was a "perfect fit" when inserted into a jaw wound suffered by a nun slain in 1980, an assistant coroner testified Tuesday at the priest's murder trial. A Canadian woman charged with plotting to smuggle Saadi el-Qaddafi, a son of the former Libyan dictator, Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, into Mexico was released from prison.     The New York Times movie critics on “World War Z,” “Monsters University” and “A Hijacking.”     A DNA-binding-dye stained fluorescence micrograph of naturally occurring marine bacterioplankton.Photo: Edward DeLong The new pope has a tense relationship with Argentina’s president; he was the last conclave’s runner-up. TOKYO - Japanese officials took a series of early steps Friday to bring the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant under control, but a week into the crisis, it was becoming apparent that they were confronting a problem that would not be resolved quickly. The rate of the most common operating-room procedure performed in the United States ranges from 7 percent of all births at one hospital to 70 percent at another, a study has found. Kilian Eng's Object 10 is a collection of beautiful images at once contemporary, nostalgic, and looking towards the future in equal measure.     John Fredricksen taught the director of "Capote," Bennett Miller, and the film's screenwriter, Dan Futterman, in Mamaroneck, N.Y., in 1984. A judge found evidence of negligence by the prison in the case of an Israeli spy known as Prisoner X, but the chief prosecutor said there would be no indictments. Roosli tells Reuters future studies should look at longer-term use of cellphone use among kids. Arian Foster has had three consecutive seasons over 1,200 yards with double-digit touchdowns, but he’s not the top fantasy back.     Though still privately held, FireEye is getting plenty of attention right now because its anti-malware sandboxing technology is something a number of other vendors want to emulate -- and FireEye's growing commercial success is inching it toward possibly going public later this year. Champagne and holidays among prizes on offer as fundraising becomes ever more important for parent teacher associationsThe traditional school fair was often a summer ordeal to endure, rather than enjoy. A few hours despairing of the futility of life while trying to hook a duck, with only a dusty bottle of Blue Nun to show for it.But as parent teacher associations (PTAs) become more ambitious and fundraising becomes ever more important, schools across the country have transformed their summer events, ditching Lambrini for champagne, and dog-eared fat-burning-furnace for holidays."It's completely changed. I remember it used to be a couple of stalls and some warm soft drinks, but now there is much more hype," said Chris McNamara, head of the PTA at Oakdene community primary in Rainhill, Merseyside. "It is a lot of blood, sweat and tears, and there is definitely a competitive edge to it. In our area there are three schools, and each one wanted to be the best and offer the best prizes in the raffle."Such prizes in some affluent areas range from weekends away in parents' holiday homes to Apple gadgets untouched in their boxes. "We really upped our game in the last couple of years, with a raffle with real gifts to be won to get people to put their hands in their pockets," said Angela McCormack, an advertising manager who helped organise her Carribean-themed school fair in Harrow-on-the-Hill, London.PTAs are using Facebook and Twitter to draw in a wider net of parents and use their skills and contacts, said Siobhan Freegard, founder of the parenting site Netmums. "We see a lot of mums with professional backgrounds are finding their schools are less interested in them manning the cake stand and more in what business contacts they can bring to the table. But I also think a lot of parents have seen the second-hand tat on offer, have thought they could do much better and have rolled their sleeves up and got stuck in."Olivia Brown, a self-employed interior and events designer, created a summer fair around an Alice in Wonderland theme at Whittington primary in Staffordshire and used Facebook to source prizes. "We definitely upped the ante this year, and at the end had 250 to 300 people who went home with light hearts and lighter pockets."Companies, such as local estate agents, are increasingly being encouraged to sponsor the fairs, provide funds or donate prizes in return for a mention in the programme or a banner on a school field. Barclays is one of several firms which matches the funding raised by their employees, while others sponsor schools as part of their corporate social responsibility schemes."PTAs have really upped their game in the past five years or so, and some of them are now incredibly successful and running as small social enterprises," said Annette Wiles, of PTA UK, a charitable body that supports PTAs. "We're seeing more creativity and people moving beyond the school and linking up with business, seeking out sponsorship. It's a mutually beneficial relationship."Wiles added that, although the upmarket shift was marked in some schools, it was the fete staples that still often brought in the crowds. "Putting headteachers in the stocks and throwing sponges at them is still unsurprisingly popular," she said.It is not just about pushy parents, though, according to Lisa Stone, still recovering after helping raise £10,000 at her children's primary in Putney. With extra funding for schools drying up and difficult economic times, schools need extra funds more than ever. "It's so important, for state schools in particular, to get google sniper 2.0 funding," she said. "Parents know the schools can't afford the things they want their children to have, they know what the funds are for and they see the benefits immediately."Some have taken fundraising to the next level. At Cathy Ranson's son's sixth-form college in Buckinghamshire, students visited parents asking them to pledge money over a period of years to fund a new building. Within a few months, Chesham grammar school had raised the required £500,000. "If you are lucky enough to have parents at the school it makes a big difference," she said. "I think PTAs are getting better at targeting valuable parents, looking at what skills they have and what they can offer."Which works well in leafy Buckinghamshire, or affluent north London suburbs. But in schools where parents are struggling to make ends meet, it is much more of a challenge, said writer and mother Natasha Edwards. She has found it difficult to attract much-needed funds for her son's school fair in Harlesden, north-west London."There are two sides to this story," she said. "If your school is in the middle of a housing estate and nearly 40% of the kids are on free school meals, businesses are just less keen to get involved." A neighbouring school, with more affluent parents, had an iPad in the raffle; another was offering a week's holiday in a house in Spain that belonged to one of the parents. "Our school has a different intake and some of the parents lack the language skills and confidence to get involved," said Edwards.She convinced a local estate agent to fund the bouncy castle, and was heartened when Tesco and Homebase offered help. The Argos, Superdrug and Poundstretcher stores on the parade of shops close to the school were less willing to help, she said. "It can be frustrating. But the great thing is, like any school fair, you see parents from all different backgrounds contributing what they can to make their child's school better."School fundingSchoolsPrimary schoolsSecondary schoolsAlexandra Toppingguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Chicago Blackhawks winger Patrick Kane was awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player of the Stanley Cup playoffs after helping his team to the National Hockey League championship on Monday.     Treasury Department officials on Tuesday ratcheted up the financial pressure on Libya, freezing the assets of the foreign minister and 16 state-owned entities in a widening of the three-week-old U.S. sanctions effort. Q: DEAR TIM: My husband installed a new gasket on the toilet in our master bathroom as part of adding a new ceramic tile floor. He's pretty handy, but I soon noticed a sewer gas odor in this room. There wasn't an odor before. He can't smell it, and I'm reluctant to have him do the job over. The t... U.S. stocks rose for a second straight week as better-than-estimated consumer confidence, housing data and technology-sector earnings suggested the recession is

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/06, 6:33 PM

    “Jane Alexander: Surveys (From the Cape of Good Hope),” at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, is the artist’s first New York solo.     By suggesting in 2010 that the church in Argentina support civil unions for gay couples, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio revealed himself to be a deal maker willing to compromise.A look at some of the airlines that have ordered the 787 Dreamliner: This suburban spot, opened last fall by the daughter of a steakhouse mogul, serves seasonal small plates and features haute-but-homey touches.     Center Brittney Griner, who has improved her technique and composure, is the star attraction on a Baylor team that is confident it will return to the Final Four. It’s not too soon to think about the coming flu season, and what must be done to avoid a repeat of this season’s epidemic. My colleague Kevin Sieff reported last week that the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology is not only the most selective school in the United States, but also one of the least diverse. After years of Jefferson promising to reach out to the third of Northern Virginia students wh... As the planned expansion of the Geffrye Museum is halted, is it a victory for local heritage or a missed opportunity?Hackney is no stranger to class warfare, and architects and their buildings are never far from the front line. The irony of David Adjaye's proposal for a "Fashion Village" of luxury boutiques, funded by riot regeneration money in an area of council housing blocks, was not lost on many. The estate agent Foxtons has recently arrived around the corner, touting a two-bed house for £2.25m – how long before it suffers the same fate as its Brixton branch, which had "yuppies out!" scrawled across its Pregnancy Miracle week?But no project has embodied this symbolic tension as much as the story of the Geffrye Museum's expansion in Hoxton, which came to a head yesterday. The £18.9m project for the museum of historic interiors had proposed the demolition of the former Marquis of Lansdowne pub, built in the 1830s, to make way for a concrete extension designed by Sir David Chipperfield. It was perceived as a knighted, gold medal-wearing architect joining forces with a museum of middle class taste to bulldoze a bastion of working class culture.It is a perception that wasn't dispelled when the museum's director, David Dewing, was quoted as saying that he "had no interest in the culture of the labouring classes" in Private Eye – something he has rebutted as "nonsense" in a letter published in this week's issue. But the campaign had already gained momentum and the plans were accordingly thrown out by the planning committee yesterday by seven votes to two."It's a triumph for local democracy," says Dan Cruickshank, who campaigned with the Spitalfields Trust, Victorian Society and Save Britain's Heritage to preserve the Marquis, whose history is brilliantly captured on the Spitalfields Life blog. "It always seemed absolutely daft for a museum of historic interiors to want to demolish a wonderful little pub – and we had 2,000 local signatures saying as much."The new extension, supported by £10.9m from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), would house a gallery, library and collections store as well as restaurant and conference facilities, but the council said the public benefits were "not of sufficient merit to justify the loss of the public house." They were also "unconvinced" that a proposed walkway attached to the back of the Grade I listed almshouse, which the museum has occupied since 1914, "wouldn't natural vitiligo treatment review natural vitiligo treatment harm" to the building."We were devastated to hear the news, after spending half a million pounds and four years' hard work, with full support of the planning officers," says David Dewing. "But now we're just angry." As a result of the decision, the museum will likely lose its funding from the HLF, which was originally won in 2011 for a scheme that retained the pub. So why didn't they continue down that route, and opt for a design that incorporated the building – in the manner of Haworth Tompkins' Young Vic theatre in Southwark, which retains a Victorian butcher's shop in the middle of the block to great effect? It's hardly beneath the capabilities of Chipperfield's office, whose finest work rejoices in the historic carcass of the Neues Museum in Berlin."We looked at options for keeping the building, but it was untenable," says Dewing. "We don't have a perverse desire to knock it down for the hell of it. It's a shaky little building, on its knees. It could maybe work as office space, but we need conference and educational facilities."The campaigners are not so convinced: "That's absolute balderdash," says Cruickshank. "It might not have been used as a pub for 20 years, but it is in good nick, as proved by the fact that it is been occupied and in use" – as the bohemian headquarters of design agency Designersblock, who have leased the space on a peppercorn rent from the museum for the last 10 years. Cruickshank says the Spitalfields Trust would happily buy the building "for a sensible price" and convert it back into a functioning pub – a move supported by the Campaign for Real Ale.But Dewing is adamant that the furore over the pub is a red herring, forex growth bot review the problem lies much deeper in the planning committee's approach to the entire scheme."They just didn't understand the design," he says. "If you took a work of art to your local art gallery they might not like it very much; but if you took it to the Tate they might say it's amazing.""We are determined that the decision needs to be overturned. We're not going to let it lie." But with only four months to go before the HLF funding expires, they may have little choice.• David Chipperfield was unavailable for commentArchitectureDesignDavid ChipperfieldHeritagePubsMuseumsMuseumsLondonOliver Wainwrightguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Andrew Leighton is not a golfer, but the prospect of living on a golf course was intriguing when he and his family discovered the Cross Creek neighborhood. Now, Leighton, his wife, Jackie and their two children enjoy the view from their home adjacent to the course, located along the border betwee... The filmmakers Derek Anderson and Victor Kubicek discuss “In God We Trust.”     All scientific outputs should be judged on content regardless of whether the author is male or female, says Laura Waters Celebrating my 10th anniversary as an academic scientist I find myself as committed as ever to being the best researcher and lecturer I can be. Yet a big part of me is also keen to be waiting at 3:15pm to meet my son as he rushes out the school gates eager to tell me about his day. Is it possible to do both of these things successfully? Can you be a devoted mum, a dedicated scientist and get promoted? That not only depends on you, but also i want my girlfriend back people that surround you.To make it as an academic scientist requires years of training, an incredibly thick skin and long hours. To make it as a mum requires patience, compassion and equally long hours. To do both however, requires an organised mind and a continual 'plan B'.I'm a scientist but not a feminist. Yes, we could do with more women choosing a career in science and yes, we need more women at the higher levels of management but that doesn't make me a feminist: I'm an 'equalist'. I believe that all scientific outputs should be judged on their content rather than on the fact the author was a female or male scientist. Regardless of gender, ethnicity or any other factor, what matters most is achieving the results by having the best person for the job – male or female.Where we tend to fall down is ensuring women actively choose to stay in science and climb the promotional ladder. It's a tough climb and if you throw in being a parent alongside this it can make it impossible. I would never say that women have it harder than men, or vice versa – many friends would be considered 'unconventional' where the mother is the major wage earner and the father stays at home. However, having witnessed several accomplished female friends commit career suicide (especially in academia) in favour of a family, I know it does happen.I've been lucky at the University of Huddersfield to have been able to gradually increase my hours back up to full time this year. That isn't to say it has been easy though. To keep my research group going has meant many late nights working on the laptop after bedtime songs are sung.To be a successful scientist in academia Fibroids-Miracle no children, male or female) you really must love your job, and self motivation is essential. Just as important for me though is having a partner who supports me and a work environment that can be flexible.Far more could still be done in universities to help encourage women to stay and succeed, some have childcare on campus, some have flexible working hours policies, yet lots of the women I know are still 'choosing' between a career and parenting rather than trying to do both, so clearly more support is needed.There's no doubt that more men still occupy senior roles in academia and industry, but there are initiatives in place to redress this imbalance. The Athena Swan scheme is one such example of a programme helping universities externally recognise their achievements and internally devise plans for their shortfalls. Even so, there is still far from equal gender representation in academia, especially in subjects such as chemistry and engineering. I am fully devoted to promoting science to women as a great career choice and I honestly believe we need more women at all levels in science, but that is because I am an 'equalist', not a feminist.Laura Waters is a senior lecturer in pharmaceutical science at the University of Huddersfield – follow her on Twitter @DrLauraWatersThis content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To get more articles like this direct to your inbox, become a member of the Higher Education Network.AcademicsScienceHigher educationWomenFeminismguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     KABUL - More than 200 Afghans were killed in attacks and military operations during the past two weeks, Afghan officials said Saturday, tinnitus miracle the deadliest period for civilians since the war began. Leaking water can sometimes create a massive water blister in latex paint on a ceiling. You may mistake this for ruined drywall when, in fact, the drywall may not have to be replaced. Kilian Eng's Object 10 is a collection of beautiful images at once contemporary, nostalgic, and looking towards the future in equal measure.     Nelson Mandela’s oldest daughter compared the press pack waiting outside the hospital in Pretoria where he remains in critical condition to “vultures” in an interview with South African state television broadcast on Thursday. The place to talk about games and other things that matterIt's Friday.GamesKeith Stuartguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Actor to star as Nick, who becomes a suspect in his wife's disappearance, in film of Gillian Flynn's bestselling novelBen Affleck is in line to play the lead in David Fincher's Gone Girl, according to the Hollywood Reporter.Gone Girl, based on the bestselling book by Gillian Flynn, tells the story of Nick – a failed journalist – and his wife, Amy, who goes missing on the day of the couple's fifth wedding anniversary. If confirmed, Affleck will play Nick, who becomes a suspect in the police investigation after it becomes clear their relationship was not as happy as it seemed. The book divides narrative between Nick's reaction to the disappearance and Amy's diary entries from the start of their relationship. Flynn has written the screenplay, but it's unclear whether the film will follow the same structure.Affleck, whose last film as director, Argo, won best picture at this year's Oscars, will next appear in Runner, Shapeshifter Yoga review crime thriller in which he plays a corrupt online-poker player who leads a naive Princeton student (Justin Timberlake) astray. Live By Night, the prohibition-era gangster story based on David Lehane's novel that Affleck will direct and star in, is currently in production.Ben AffleckDavid FincherThrillerDramaGillian FlynnFilm adaptationsHenry Barnesguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     The foundation, which presents the National Book Awards, reached into the fields of academia, journalism and education as it tries to expand beyond publishing.     Manchester United goalkeeper David De Gea has been included in Spain's squad for this month's World Cup soccer qualifiers against Finland and France, coach Vicente del Bosque said on Friday. Rio de Janeiro's programme in the 80s to build more than 500 integrated education centres from a standardised system could show the way for embedding great design as standardFrom now on, our children will be taught in flatpack sheds and converted kebab shops. That's the message education secretary Michael Gove has been sending out since he launched his two-pronged vision for schools: to be built from standardised kits, or else to "pop up" in whatever redundant high street unit might be to hand.Triumphantly axing Labour's Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme, accusing architects of "creaming off cash" and declaring that "we won't be getting any award-winning architects to design your school", Gove seemed to take on the appearance of a surreal pantomime baddie, continually bashing the profession.Issuing Dickensian diktats about the future of education, his no-frills approach to school building almost descended into farce with the James Review, in which he commissioned an expert in cheap, mass-produced retail sheds to advise on trademiner of spaces that might be good for teaching and learning: big cheap sheds was the inevitable conclusion.But by waging war on architects – and provoking their body, the RIBA, into waging it back – both Gove and his opponents have obscured the debate we should be having: about what "standardisation" actually means. Properly developed, with the involvement of architects, might system building actually be a good thing?Much confusion has come from the government's own uncertainty about the right way forward. The bold call of the James Review for standardised designs, which prompted excited contractors to begin developing cheap flatpack kits, was soon sidelined in favour of "baseline" guidance. Launched in October last year, this specified that schools "should be simple rectilinear forms", 15% smaller than those under BSF, and built for £1,465 per square metre (half the price of most BSFs).The RIBA slammed the "flatpack" approach as "far too restrictive" and warned that it would "place a straitjacket on future generations of teaching professionals and quickly render these schools redundant". It claimed that the guidance showed no regard for student wellbeing, environmental comfort, accessibility or long-term sustainability.One of the first contractors to attempt to prove them wrong was Wilmott Dixon, whose Sunesis system – which received glowing Design Council endorsement – can allegedly reduce the cost of a new school by up to 30%, and cut the build programme by about 20 weeks. Featuring "central learning streets" and "flexible teaching spaces", it does nonetheless look like a shed, and there would be difficulty adapting it to awkward, sloping sites. So is there another way?Architects David Chambers and Kevin Haley, of young practice Aberrant, think that there might be – and have been looking to Brazil for answers. As part of the British vision without glasses review Takeaway exhibition at the RIBA, Chambers and Haley travelled to Rio de Janeiro to investigate a little-known programme of standardised school building in the 1980s, which left more than 500 system-built schools across the state – designed by none other than Oscar Niemeyer.The Integrated Centres of Public Education (CIEPs) were a response to an educational crisis, as mass migration from the countryside swelled the urban population. With a pressing need to create a vast number of schools in as short a time as possible, the state governors turned to Niemeyer, who developed a system based on a simple kit of concrete parts, and oversaw the establishment of a centralised factory for prefabrication."While criticism of standard systems in the UK has tended to focus on the desire to strip out as much of the 'architecture' as possible, we were fascinated to find that standardisation in Brazil was driven by a focus on extending the reach of high-quality architecture to everyone," says Chambers.The schools were designed as clusters of separate buildings, "like a concentration of a city," according to Washington Fajardo, president of the Rio World Heritage Institute. "You have the basic building, and then you have a series of associate buildings: an outdoor covered sports hall, an octagon-shaped library and a house on the roof for live-in pupils."These buildings could be configured in different ways according to the site, making it the ultimate flexible system – adapting to hillsides, city squares and leftover spaces next to major roads. But in all cases, the school stood as a proud civic beacon, designed with an emphatic, graphic presence."The CIEPs were often in poorer areas, such as favelas and beach towns, where there wasn't a lot of public infrastructure, so they took on a bigger civic role," directory of ezine "The covered playgrounds, for example, became vital public squares. It was crucial that they operated beyond the role of being a school: the whole programme was about using architecture to symbolise a new educational philosophy."In attempting to launch a future of standardised schools in the UK, just what kind of educational philosophy is Gove trying to promote, and how might he learn from Brazil?• The debate will be continued at the RIBA on Tuesday 19 March, at Lessons from Brazil: Is Standardised School Design Compatible with Architecture? Chaired by Oliver Wainwright, the panel will feature Washington Fajardo, of the Rio World Heritage Institute, David Chambers, of Aberrant Architecture, Mairi Johnson, Deputy Design Director at the Education Funding Agency, Janie Chesterton, education sector director at Willmott Dixon and Sunand Prasad of Penoyre & Prasad Architects. The exhibition runs until 27 April, and Guardian Extra members can buy tickets for the talks at the discounted rate of £5.ArchitectureSchoolsSchool building programmeBrazilOscar NiemeyerMichael GoveConstruction industryEducation policyOliver Wainwrightguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds In July, odorless gases will be released at street level and in the subways to study how airborne toxins would flow after a terrorist attack or a spill of hazardous chemicals.     Rob Zombie likes to keep busy As he prepares for the release of his newest film as a director The Lo[...] If you simply cannot or will not use real buttons, make sure your fake buttons can be focused and activated without using a mouse. What travel pros wear on their feet, financing a vacation home, the anxiety of unanswered e-mail and other consumer-focused news from The New York

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/06, 6:31 PM

    When a Nazi collaborator is led into the Belarusian forest to be executed, why doesn't he protest? Sergei Loznitsa's chilling drama explores the agonies of war and puts European history on trialThe fog of the title is the fog of war, the fog of fear and the abysmal fog of European history: it is a kind of residual pall of smoke across the field of battle – maybe it also means the obliteration brought by death itself. This is the chilling and mysterious historical parable from film-maker Sergei Loznitsa, based on the 1989 novel by the Belarusian author Vasili Bykov, resembling Elem Klimov's Come and See. (Bykov also wrote the 1970 novel The Ordeal, filmed by Larisa Shepitko as The Ascent.)Its subject is the Nazis' invasion of the Soviet Union, and in particular the poisonous shame of collaboration that they disseminated in every part of the Reich. An important part of this film's meaning is to show that collaboration was not simply an administrative necessity, but a secret and exquisitely cruel perquisite of victory: sadistically imposing self-hate on the defeated ones, renewing the triumph by perpetuating the conquered people's division and dismay. It begins in 1942 with a laceratingly grim spectacle in which the Nazis parade three guerrilla-saboteurs through their village in Belarus on the way to be hanged: they are railway workers who have loosened a length of track to disrupt the Germans' supply lines. The officer superintending this theatre of cruelty is Grossmeier, played by Vlad Ivanov (who memorably portrayed the abortionist in Cristian Mungiu's 4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days); with a toadlike expression of contempt, he is the only character that smiles. But four workers were understood to be involved in the sabotage attempt. One is still free, and therefore instantly suspected of having cut a deal with the Nazis; this is Sushenya, played by Vladimir Svirskiy. One night, two partisans Pregnancy Miracle over their shoulders arrive at his cottage to take him away: they are Burov (Vladislav Abashin) and Voitik (Sergei Kolesov) – the former, it appears, knows Sushenya from his boyhood. Sushenya is made to bring a shovel with him, and there can be no doubt what the penalty for collaboration is going to be: he calmly proclaims his innocence, but offers no resistance, accompanying them into the ancient, trackless forest where a mysterious answer to the question, "Who is betraying whom?" awaits all three.Sushenya looks to me like a cross between Anatoly Solonitsyn in Andrei Rublev and Dennis Hopper in Apocalypse Now: stricken and stoic. Extended flashback sequences show what has brought both Burov and Sushenya to this point, and though none of it undermines the latter's protestations of innocence, it shows how he alone understood the terrible choices involved in being a partisan, how whole villages will of course be murdered by the Nazis in reprisal and how, in resisting, one runs the arguable risk of amplifying the original evil. Sushenya makes no secret of his envy for the men who were hanged: the shame of (supposed) collaboration begins to look like a symptom of the larger shame of defeat, the unthinkable desecration of the motherland that may yet be part of some larger divine plan. (Like many other critics, I found Sushenya's ordeal comparable to the scenes in the last volume of War and Peace, in which partisans, based in the forest, fought against Napoleon's invading armies and struggled to protect a core of the Russian soul.)It may be that Loznitsa intended a subliminal suggestion of Christ and the two thieves, but the resonances are more secular. "Why do we trust the Germans, but no longer our neighbours?" asks one partisan, and the fear and paranoia being dramatised here carries an echo of natural vitiligo treatment review natural vitiligo treatment betrayals and purges of the previous decade, and the "I sold you and you sold me" refrain of Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.Sushenya behaves as he does because of any number of reasons: fatalism, perhaps, or world-weariness, or a subtle intention to dissuade his captors from killing him, or a Soviet patriotism and loyalty that exceeds any sense of personal choice or guilt. Perhaps, like TS Eliot's Becket, he has already resigned himself to his fate in the weeks that preceded the partisans' arrival at his cottage, and now faces his quasi-martyrdom with equanimity; or perhaps he has decided that dying at the hands of a countryman is preferable to being killed by the enemy, and Sushenya has devised a new kind of Belarusian hara-kiri. (Another comparison that came to mind watching this was Alexander Sokurov's The Sun, and Hirohito's renunciation of divine status after Hiroshima and Nagasaki: the ritual suicide of a god.) In The Fog is a haunting depiction of the hidden tragedies of war.Rating: 4/5World cinemaDramaPeter Bradshawguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The BlackBerry Q10 has the classic BlackBerry design: half-height screen above, physical keyboard below.    The play “Lucky Guy,” Nora Ephron’s last completed work, is about a journalist who kept striving to do his best work even as he was dying of cancer. He was her inspiration to do the same. The NFL distributed a document to its teams Monday reiterating its anti-discrimination policy on sexual orientation.     Do you smile when you’re frustrated? Most people think they don’t — but they actually do, a new study from MIT has found. What’s more, it turns out that computers programmed with the latest information from this research do a forex growth bot review of differentiating smiles of delight and frustration than human observers do.The research could pave the way for computers that better assess the emotional states of their users and respond accordingly. It could also help train those who have difficulty interpreting expressions, such as people with autism, to more accurately gauge the expressions they see.“The goal is to help people with face-to-face communication,” says Ehsan Hoque, a graduate student in the Affective Computing Group of MIT’s Media Lab who is lead author of a paper just published in the IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing. Hoque’s co-authors are Rosalind Picard, a professor of media arts and sciences, and Media Lab graduate student Daniel McDuff.In experiments conducted at the Media Lab, people were first asked to act out expressions of delight or frustration, as webcams recorded their expressions. Then, they were either asked to fill out an online form designed to cause frustration or invited to watch a video designed to elicit a delighted response — also while being recorded.When asked to feign frustration, Hoque says, 90 percent of subjects did not smile. But when presented with a task that caused genuine frustration — filling out a detailed online form, only to then find the information deleted after pressing the “submit” button — 90 percent of them did smile, he says. Still images showed little difference between these frustrated smiles and the delighted smiles elicited by a video of a cute baby, but video analysis showed that the progression of the two kinds of smiles was quite different: Often, the happy smiles built up gradually, while frustrated smiles appeared quickly but faded fast. The philosophy department said the push to use the courses would compromise education quality, stifle diverse viewpoints and lead to the dismantling of public universities.     Thornton Wilder's 1926 debut novel is i want my girlfriend back song for individuals whose mystery is proportionate to their wealthIn the crumbling salons of Rome in 1926, a young American encounters a decaying elite: intellectual, aristocratic, and "so wonderful that they're lonely". These are the "cabalists", a shadowy, enigmatic group into whose charmed lives he is briefly drawn to capture the last moment of their glory.  Hailed by Time as "one of the most delectable myths that ever issued from the hills of Rome", Thornton Wilder's 1926 debut novel probes the inscrutable mystery of the ancient, fabulous wealth that confers a kind of immortality on its custodians, allowing their natures to form without concession or compromise to life beyond their privileged enclave. Part lapdog, part emissary for this vestigial pantheon, he presents them as capricious and ridiculous, powerful and vulnerable: Mademoiselle de Mortfontaine campaigns ardently to reinstate the Divine Right of Kings but clings to a girlish faith, while it is the Princess d'Espoli's fate to become "a pure well of heartbroken frivolity", tirelessly expending unrequited love on young men.The Cabala established Wilder as one of the most accomplished stylists of his generation, though its critical reception was soon overshadowed by the overnight sensation of his next, Pulitzer prize-winning novel, The Bridge of San Luis Rey. Wilder always feared that his father considered his novels "carved cherrystones" – symbols of beauty without use – but the elegance of his writing overlays a more muscular intent: Wilder wrote later, "In The Cabala I began to think that love is enough to reconcile one to the difficulty of living". The Cabala is a love song for individuals whose mystery is proportionate to their wealth – but Mercury, messenger of the gods, is also a guide to the dead, and so it becomes also a requiem for a world that was not long to Fibroids-Miracle great war.ClassicsFictionLettie Ransleyguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Florida Panthers center Stephen Weiss will have wrist surgery next week that will sideline him for three months, likely ending his season, the National Hockey League team said on Tuesday. HIROSHIMA, JAPAN - A powerful tsunami triggered by a massive earthquake devastated the northeastern coast of Japan on Friday, leaving hundreds dead and launching waves that triggered warnings from Alaska to South America. Amid official criticism of news organizations for their reporting of Nelson Mandela’s illness, a daughter called his condition “very critical” and said “anything is imminent.” With no first-round picks in the MLS draft, D.C. United drafts Andrew Jacobson, a 6-foot-2 midfielder from the University of California, in the second round. The need for multi-disciplinary thinking was clear in Judge’s talk, which cited eight separate areas that any country pursuing nuclear energy must address. These ranged from high-level planning and education to economics, waste management and even the psychology of regulatory relationships, which inevitably vary from country to country.The U.S., Judge said, provides strict “fences” that delineate what is allowable, while the British system tends to emphasize principles. “I think Americans need clear demarcation ... the British are more used to codes of conduct, so it’s horses for courses,” she explained. In pre-Fukushima Japan, she said, regulators and operators tended to be overly close, “so there was no competitive tension, which is what you need — a strong, respected regulator.” Working to remedy this with a more-independent structure is part of Judge’s mission on the TEPCO committee.But above all, Judge said, “nuclear, first and foremost ... is a political issue. You can’t do anything about building tinnitus miracle until you get the politics right.”Read more MEXICO CITY - A survivor of a massacre in northern Mexico told investigators that the 72 people found dead at a ranch were undocumented migrants who were kidnapped by a drug gang on their way to the U.S. border. "The first time Eva and I met, it was a very emotional thing to, first of all, have found someone so perfect, so close and so in need of the milk," Guigliano tells the newspaper. Once seen as a wasteland, Brazil's Cerrado - a wide savannah that covers nearly a quarter of the country - is now the motor of an agro-industry so potent that Brazil threatens to surpass the United States as breadbasket to the world. Reloadable cards are becoming more widely used but they don’t have to carry federal deposit insurance. Apple yesterday updated OS X Mountain Lion for the first time in six months, patching 14 security vulnerabilities and addressing a host of other issues. Alongside the operating system update, Apple also upgraded the Safari browser to version 6.0.3, fixing 17 security flaws. As top seeds slip and slide away, taking their favoured looks with them, it is left to SW19's pigeon deterrent to strike the strongest wardrobe noteWith several of the top seeds exiting the competition in the first week, there is concern that the slippery courts of SW19 may yet claim another victim – Wimbledon tennis chic. If there are no heavily sponsored showmen and women left in the competition, who is going to deliver on the All England Club trend front?Early indications suggest that rather than having one memorable look, Wimbledon 2013 is shaping up to be a tournament of the micro-trend.Leggings under dresses is one of the more obvious minitrends. The look – minimal layering – has Shapeshifter Yoga review by Jelena Jankovic, the No 14 seed now out of the competition. Jankovic built up the look with a long-sleeved top, a drop-waist miniskirt and just-below-the-knee leggings.Despite being a symphony in white, it was a disjointed silhouette that even the rouge noir nails and a Victoria Beckham-style ponytail failed to save. Victoria Azarenka, the second seed from Belarus who also withdrew with an injury, was another exponent of the layered look.Another trend that fell victim to Black Wednesday was what is known in the fashion industry as "a pop of colour". Azarenka attempted to spice up her blank palette with some hot pink shoelaces, while Sharapova wore tangerine shorts under her dress, which were intended to highlight her matching Nike swoosh.With Sharapova out, the fate of the orange shorts trend is now in the hands of Serena Williams, who favours a more orangey-coral pair. Incidentally, the US star has also been left to fly the flag for the Brideshead look now that tennis blazer fan Roger Federer has exited. Williams has been warming up in a Nike stretch blazer and proving that the category of performance tailoring still has some way to go before it makes it on to the pages of Vogue.British star Laura Robson – with her black shorts trimmed with yellow, her Adidas logo T-shirt and her rope-like plait – is proof that practice court fashions can be superior to Centre Court. In fact Robson, with a fair wind – and a Stella McCartney designed kit – could prove to be the breakout fashion star of Wimbledon 2013.The US player Bethanie Mattek-Sands is evidence that SW19 is not immune to the style influence of east London. Her messy, tennis-ball green bun looked as if it had been created in Dalston hipster salon Bleach London. Add to that the trademiner as sported by Serena Williams and Britain's Heather Watson – the former preferring orange lightning bolts and leopard print, the latter 3D gold crystals – and there seems to be a Wimbledon beauty look waiting to be Instagrammed.Off-court, the fashion credentials of the royal box hang in the balance. With the absence of Anna Wintour due presumably to her friend Federer's defeat, the photo-worthy spectator trends lie in the wardrobes of the tonsorially-blessed Kim Sears, girlfriend of Andy Murray, and Grazia princess Pippa Middleton: both of whom favour pastels, wedge sandals and posh bags. Nice enough, but both lacking the sartorial bite to be regarded as memorable All England Club trendsetters.In fact it is Rufus the hawk – employed by tournament officials to keep the pigeons away from the courts – who is making the strongest fashion statement this tournament. His purple and green moulded hood, complete with leather and gold plume, strikes the right sort of showman-like wardrobe note that Wimbledon 2013 is thus far missing – and it wouldn't look out of place on an Alexander McQueen catwalk either.Wimbledon 2013WimbledonTennisImogen Foxguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     INDIANAPOLIS -- Tammy Sutton-Brown scored a career-high 26 points and the Indiana Fever set a franchise scoring record in a 103-89 win over the Phoenix Mercury in the regular-season finale for both teams on Sunday. Outside, it’s minus 22 degrees as a February wind blasts across the Central Asian steppe and through the Mongolian capital, Ulaanbaatar. Inside Government House, President Tsakhia Elbegdorj delivers a televised speech that simultaneously warms his people and chills foreign investors. Read full article >>     NEW YORK -- Jia Perkins scored 19 points to lead vision without glasses review Sky to a 69-60 win over the New York Liberty on Thursday night, the teams' first game after a monthlong Olympic break. Sky News reporter Mark Stone suggests early on, in his live broadcast from the back of a Chinese police van, that one word got him there: 1989. He had been broadcasting from Tiananmen Square in Beijing, probably a routine story on the just-a-formality election of Xi Jinping as president of China, when he mentioned the 1989 protests. Read full article >> Esther Duflo, Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics at MIT, and a founder and director of MIT’s Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), has been selected as one of the five laureates of the 2013 Dan David Prize. The prize, established in 2002, is an international enterprise endowed by the Dan David Foundation and headquartered at Tel Aviv University. The award recognizes individuals who have left an indelible impression, whether “scientific, technological, cultural or social,” in one of three time dimensions: past, present, or future.The futureDuflo will receive the Future Time Dimension award, which honors those whose work has the potential to significantly improve the world. This year’s future prize recipients were chosen based on their pioneering research, which has contributed to the advancement of preventive medicine.Alfred Sommer, Professor of Epidemiology and International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has also received a 2013 award in the Future Time Dimension category. Duflo will share the $1 million monetary prize (awarded in each Time Dimension) with Sommer. In addition, 10 percent of the money must also be donated to graduate students in the laureates’ respective fields, to help cultivate the next generation of scholars. Alleviating poverty through disease prevention Duflo was selected as a 2013 laureate because “she combines rigorous directory of ezine and strong, randomized study design to puncture preconceptions and produce reliable measures of effects,” said the Dan David Prize judges. “While her work ranges across a spectrum of social conditions and strategies related to the alleviation of poverty, a number deal directly with the prevention of disease.” The Dan David Prize International Board cited Duflo for her research on the long-term health effects of indoor-air pollution on women and children; insight into controlling the spread of malaria; findings on the benefits of combining targeted education on sexually transmitted diseases and fertility with financial incentives; and discovery that inexpensive incentives more than double the rate of completed immunizations in India.Transforming development economicsSpeaking of the award, Whitney Newey, the Carlton Professor of Economics at MIT and head of MIT’s Department of Economics, said, "Esther and the team she works with have had an important impact on the theory and practice of economic development. Their focus on careful thinking and empirical evidence has helped transform development economics in a way that blesses many of the world's poorest people."Earlier this year President Barack Obama appointed Duflo to the President’s Global Development Council. She is also the recipient of the John Bates Clark Medal (2010), a MacArthur Fellowship “genius grant” (2009), and the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award (2011) for co-authoring Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty (with Abhijit V. Banerjee, Ford International Professor of Economics at MIT).Duflo will be presented the 2013 Dan David Prize for the Future Time Dimension at the annual awards ceremony held in Tel Aviv in June. WASHINGTON -- Bankers and merchants, pillars of the business world and frequent allies, are embroiled in a bitter lobbying battle over something Americans do 38 billion times a year - swipe their debit cards. Both sides vigorously claim to speak for

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    on 2013/11/06, 6:30 PM

    Black Sabbath have expanded their four 2013 tour dates into a full 20-date North American trek that [...] Scenes from the Broadway revival of Horton Foote’s play.    Actor to join former co-stars Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher in Disney's forthcoming sequel – though 'it's not in the bag yet'Harrison Ford has confirmed for the first time that he expects to return as sardonic space smuggler Han Solo in Disney's forthcoming new Star Wars film.Interviewed on the red carpet in Chicago by WGN9 News while promoting his new film, the Jackie Robinson baseball biopic 42, Ford said he was looking forward to shooting the recently announced Episode VII. However, he also implied the move was not yet a done deal.Asked if the "old gang" were likely to get back together for the new Star Wars film, Ford replied: "I think it's almost true. I'm looking forward to it … it's not in the bag yet, but I think it's happening."The actor is the final member of the original Star Wars trio of Solo, Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher) to confirm talks or willingness to return to the long-running space saga. Star Trek's JJ Abrams was revealed in January as the director who will take on Star Wars Episode VII following Disney's $4.05bn (£2.7m) purchase of all rights to the series in October. The new film is set to arrive in cinemas in 2015, with plans to release sequels every two to three years after that, and also talk of separate spin-off films that could emerge earlier and be Pregnancy Miracle the timeline of the original trilogy. Toy Story 3 writer Michael Arndt is overseeing the screenplay for the debut instalment, while Disney has revealed that The Empire Strikes Back's Lawrence Kasdan and Sherlock Holmes' Simon Kinberg will write two of the standalone movies.Entertainment Weekly reported last month that Ford might appear in a framing device as an older Han Solo in a standalone film about the wise-cracking captain of the Millennium Falcon's youthful adventures. Boba Fett and Yoda are the other characters rumoured to be getting their own outings. The spin-off movies are believed to be inspired by Marvel Studios' successful run of comic-book films set in the same thematic universe that culminated in parent group Disney's biggest box office smash of the decade in 2012, the $1.5bn superhero ensemble adventure The Avengers.Star WarsHarrison FordMark HamillJJ AbramsScience fiction and fantasyAction and adventureWalt Disney CompanyGeorge LucasCarrie FisherBen Childguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Many people in eastern Cuba are still living with family or in houses covered by flimsy makeshift rooftops six months after Hurricane Sandy pummeled the island's eastern provinces, residents and aid workers said Thursday.     When homeowners cut their landscaping budget, they typically get rid of things such as garden pools, fountains, walls, seating, sculpture, containers and lighting. But these elements, which can be grouped together as "site amenities," contribute to the impact of a garden. The chief preoccupation of middle-class Americans, according natural vitiligo treatment review natural vitiligo treatment new poll, is not the dream of getting ahead but the fear of falling behind. Video: Melanie Gonick The Grizzlies are very happy after finally getting a bit of payback for their first-round loss to the Los Angeles Clippers a year ago.     This array of videos shows spectrographic data (representing brain wave frequencies) from each of 44 electrodes attached to the scalp of a healthy volunteer undergoing propofol anesthesia. The spectrograms are arranged according to their approximate position on the scalp, with the front of the head at the top of the screen, and the back of the head at the bottom of the screen. Activity moves from back to front with loss of consciousness (levels 1 to 5) and from back to front with return of consciousness (levels 6 to 8). Each video shows brain activity throughout a 140-minute period of the study. Video by Aylin Cimenser. Reproduced from PNAS with permission. We were willing to overlook the drama in Shi Ayi's life, given how essential she was to the family as a caregiver. But I drew the line at murder. All engineering disciplines interact with society, but nuclear engineering is a special case, inexorably bound up with critical issues of our era: energy, the environment and international security. Developing a deeper understanding of the interplay of nuclear technology and society and building these insights into new models of engineering leadership are central elements of the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering's (NSE) strategic plan, and the appointment of Assistant Professor R. Scott Kemp marks forex growth bot review in extending research and teaching in this area in NSE.Kemp’s background includes an undergraduate degree in physics from the University of California at Santa Barbara and a PhD from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs — a combination that enables him to conduct integrated technical and policy analyses of global security issues, with special emphasis on nuclear proliferation.There is a need, Kemp says, for "a major correction in the trajectory of our nonproliferation policy. It’s getting much easier for countries to do what they want, to find obscure bits of information that can be pieced together to create what might be regarded as classified knowledge, and to build technology that was previously thought to be esoteric and difficult.” Kemp, who recently served as the State Department’s science advisor for nonproliferation and arms control, argues the importance of “studying how current policy evolved — do the technical assumptions still hold, or is a new perspective needed?”To this end, Kemp brings historical analysis to bear on current nuclear issues. An example is a series of recent publications on centrifuge enrichment, a technology that can produce highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. Kemp showed that this type of enrichment capability is relatively easy to establish and difficult to detect — facts that were known at the time of its invention in the late 1950s, but which were suppressed because “the necessary course corrections would have conflicted with larger foreign policy goals,” Kemp says. As a result, generations of policymakers have worked under sets of assumptions that don’t i want my girlfriend back facts.Read full article Russell Hobby of the National Association of Head Teachers cries bullocks. In this lesson, students read about the new Museum of Mathematics and its mission to convey the beauty of mathematics through fun and engaging exhibits. Then, students explore mathematics by designing and producing their own exhibit that communicates the beauty and elegance of this creative discipline.     Even if you forget to log out of Gmail from one computer, you can log out of your account on that machine from another computer. Carl Richards discusses what individuals can learn from investors who manage to separate emotion from investing.     MIT Political Scientist Roger Petersen wins Distinguished Book Award for "Western Intervention in the Balkans" Award for best book on international politics of ethnicity, nationalism or migration The Ethnicity, Nationalism and Migration section of the International Studies Association has awarded the Distinguished Book Award to Roger Petersen's "Western Intervention in the Balkans, The Strategic Use of Emotion in Conflict" (Cambridge University Press, 2011). Petersen is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science at MIT. The award recognizes the best book published over the past two years in the study of the international politics of ethnicity, nationalism or migration. The criteria for the award include the originality of the argument presented, quality of the research, ability to draw on the insights of the multiple disciplines, innovative methods or methodological syntheses, readability of the text and the policy or practical implications of the scholarship. "Western Intervention in the Balkans" has also received Fibroids-Miracle Joseph Rothschild Prize in Nationalism and Ethnic Studies, given by the Association for the Study of Nationalities, and the 2012 Marshall Shulman Book Prize, given by the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Of the book, Cambridge University Press writes: "Conflicts involve powerful experiences. The residue of these experiences is captured by the concept and language of emotion ... [including the emotions of fear, anger, desire for vengeance, resentment, and contempt]. These emotions can become resources for political entrepreneurs. A broad range of Western interventions are based on a view of human nature as narrowly rational. Correspondingly, intervention policy generally aims to alter material incentives ("sticks and carrots") to influence behavior. In response, poorer and weaker actors who wish to block or change this Western implemented "game" use emotions as resources. This book examines the strategic use of emotion in the conflicts and interventions occurring in the Western Balkans over a twenty-year period." Full Story at MIT SHASS News "Welcome back" are two words you'd really rather not hear at a hospital, especially if you've just been discharged. Yet one in five Medicare patients found themselves back in the hospital within 30 days of leaving it in 2003 and 2004, according to a recent study in the New England Journal of Medi... ACCOMACK COUNTY, Va. — The massive blaze erupted in the decrepit Whispering Pines Motel last week not far from a sign advertising a $25,000 reward for tips on one of the worst arsonists in Virginia history. Read full article >> Connecticut tinnitus miracle Napier, who led the team in scoring, will pass on the N.B.A. draft and return for his senior season.     Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw and Henry Barnes review The Paperboy, Beyond the Hills, The Spirit of '45 and The Incredible Burt WonderstoneXan BrooksPeter BradshawHenry BarnesAndrew PulverPhil Maynard World's best-selling phone manufacturer buckles to consumer pressure and reveals truth about its tin sourcingMobile phone company Samsung has admitted to using tin sourced from Indonesia's controversial Bangka Island, where an investigation last year by the Guardian and environmental charity Friends of the Earth (FoE) found that unregulated tin mining depends on child labour, wrecks the environment and kills an estimated 150 miners every year.The admission from the world's best-selling smartphone manufacturer follows intense pressure from FoE and 15,000 concerned consumers who had contacted Samsung, demanding the company investigate the human and environmental costs of its tin sourcing.In an email sent to the charity and its customers, Samsung said: "While we do not have a direct relationship with tin suppliers from Bangka Island, we do know that some of the tin that we use for manufacturing our products does originate from this area."It continued: "We are also undertaking a thorough investigation of our supply chain in the region to better understand what is happening, and what part we play."Bangka and its sister island Belitung together produce 90% of Indonesia's tin, which is used primarily as solder in consumer electronics for products like smartphones, tablets and mobiles. Around 2g of tin goes into every mobile phone, and roughly 60% of Bangka-Belitung's 1.3 million Shapeshifter Yoga review involved in tin mining and its related industries.The Guardian investigation into mining on Bangka in November last year helped generate support for FoE's Make It Better campaign, which has been calling on both Samsung and Apple to publicly declare whether they use Bangka tin in their electronics, and to back new rules to make all companies fully transparent about their supply chains, starting with a Europe-wide law next year.In a statement, FoE's Craig Bennett said: "It's great Samsung has taken an industry lead by tracking its supply chains all the way to Indonesia's tin mines and committing to taking responsibility for helping tackle the devastating impact that mining tin for electronics has on people and the environment."He added: "Rival Apple is already playing catch-up on the high street in terms of smartphone sales – it's time it followed Samsung's lead by coming clean about its whole supply chains too."MiningChild labourSamsungComputingTablet computersNatural resources and developmentKate Hodalguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Researchers at MIT have developed a new way of controlling the motion of magnetic domains — the key technology in magnetic memory systems, such as a computer’s hard disk. The new approach requires little power to write and no power to maintain the stored information, and could lead to a new generation of extremely low-power data storage.The new approach controls magnetism by applying a voltage, rather than a magnetic field. It could lead to trademiner devices in which data is written on microscopic nanowires or tracks, with magnetic “bits” of data hurtling along them like cars on a racetrack.The new findings are described in a paper published this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, written by assistant professor of materials science and engineering Geoffrey Beach and graduate students Uwe Bauer and Satoru Emori.“For hundreds of years, if you had a magnetic material and you wanted to change the direction in which the material was magnetized, you needed another magnet,” Beach explains. His team’s work represents an entirely new way to switch magnetic states using just a change in voltage, with no magnetic field — a much lower-power process. What’s more, once the magnetic state is switched, it holds that change, providing stable data storage that requires no power except during reading and writing. The researchers show that this effect can be used to enable new concepts such as “racetrack memory,” with magnetic bits speeding along a magnetic track. While there have been laboratory demonstrations of such devices, none have come close to viability for data storage: The missing piece has been a means to precisely control the position and to electrically select individual magnetic bits racing along the magnetic track. “Magnetic fields are very hard to localize,” Beach says: If you’re trying to create tiny magnetic bits on a nanowire or track, the magnetic fields from the electromagnets used to read and write data tend to spread out, making it difficult to prevent interaction with adjacent strips, especially as devices get smaller and vision without glasses review new system can precisely select individual magnetic bits represented by tiny domains in a nanowire. The MIT device can stop the movement of magnetic domains hurtling at 20 meters per second, or about 45 mph, “on a dime,” Beach says. They can then be released on demand simply by toggling the applied voltage.To achieve this feat, the MIT team built a new type of device that controls magnetism in much the same way that a transistor controls a flow of electricity. The key ingredient is a layer of ion-rich material in which atoms have been stripped of electrons, leaving them with an electric charge. A voltage applied to a small electrode above this thin layer can either attract or repel those ions; the ions, in turn, can modify the properties of an underlying magnet and halt the flow of magnetic domains. This could lead to a new family of “magneto-ionic” devices, the researchers suggest.The effect depends on chemical interactions at the boundary between thin layers of magnetic metal and solid-state electrolyte materials that are sandwiched together, Beach says. “So it’s really the interfacial chemistry that determines the magnetic properties,” he says.In practice, such a system would use a wire or strip of ferromagnetic material with a series of regularly spaced, small electrodes on top of it. The magnetic bits between these electrodes can then be selectively written or read. Once the orientation of the magnetic bit between two electrodes has been set by this device, “it inherently will retain its direction and position even in the absence of directory of ezine says. So, in practice, you could set a magnetic bit, “then turn the power off until you need to read it back,” he says.Because the magnetic switching requires no magnetic field, “there is next to no energy dissipation,” Beach says. What’s more, the resulting pinning of the magnetic bits is extremely strong, resulting in a stable storage system.The key ingredients of the system are “very simple oxide materials,” Bauer says. In particular, these tests used gadolinium oxide, which is already used in making capacitors and in semiconductor manufacturing. Dan Allwood, a researcher in materials physics at the University of Sheffield who was not involved in this research, says that it “not only offers a novel technical path to control dynamic magnetization processes in patterned nanostructures, but in doing so also presents new physical processes in how voltage can influence magnetic behavior more generally. Understanding the detailed origins of these effects could allow the creation of simple, low-power information-technology devices.”In addition to magnetic storage systems, the MIT team says, this technology could also be used to create new electronic devices based on spintronics, in which information is carried by the spin orientation of the atoms. “It opens up a whole new domain,” Beach says. “You can do both data storage and computation, potentially at much lower power.”The work was supported by the National Science Foundation. Publishers of prominent publications have embraced the concept of publishing multiple covers in a single month, hoping to lure more readers and advertisers.     To coincide with its 100th anniversary, the manufacturer of luxurious leather furniture has officially inaugurated its museum in central

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    on 2013/11/06, 6:26 PM

    ImSlide, representing the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology or Skoltech (Russia), is creating an automated system to conduct morphological analysis and immunophenotyping of leukocytes for early detection of leukemia and other blood disorders. Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou on Thursday pressed his case for continued American weapons sales to the island, including advanced U.S.-made fighter jets, saying Taiwan needs to negotiate with China from a position of strength. Ma, in an interview, said Taiwan needed both new F-16C/D fighter je...Mr. Glover, who plays the former high school football star Troy Barnes, will appear in only 5 episodes of a planned 13-episode “Community” season.     A letter to the Editor. Adults seeking job skills or new intellectual challenges pursue education online. The State Senate voted 20 to 14 Tuesday to override Gov. Mike Beebe’s veto of a bill that would Pregnancy Miracle country’s most stringent limits on abortion, banning the procedure after 12 weeks of pregnancy. The move brings US Airways and American Airlines closer to creating the world’s biggest airline but the merger is still being reviewed by antitrust regulators.     The Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, opening in Memorial Stadium, is putting the finishing touches on a device that can instantly determine if a concussion was sustained.     Children with life-threatening diseases such as cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease and diabetes now survive beyond childhood, into adult years. Preventing glass from fogging or frosting up is a longstanding challenge with myriad applications: eyeglasses, cameras, microscopes, mirrors and refrigerated displays, to name but a few. While there have been many advances in meeting this challenge, so far there has been no systematic way of testing different coatings and natural vitiligo treatment review natural vitiligo treatment see how effectively they work under real-world conditions.Now, a team of MIT researchers has developed such a testing method, and used it to find a coating that outperforms others not only in preventing foggy buildups, but also in maintaining good optical properties without distortion.The new approach is detailed in a paper in the journal ACS Nano, written by Michael Rubner, the TDK Professor of Polymer Materials Science and Engineering; Robert Cohen, the Raymond A. and Helen E. St. Laurent Professor of Chemical Engineering; doctoral student Hyomin Lee; and recent MIT graduate Maria Alcaraz.“When people want to tackle the fogging process, caused when microscopic water droplets condense on a cold surface and scatter light, the common way of doing it is to build a surface that’s so hydrophilic — water-loving — that the water spreads out into forex growth bot review says Rubner, who is also director of MIT’s Center for Materials Science and Engineering. “So even though the water’s there, it doesn’t scatter the light.”But there can be a problem with that approach: In applications where it’s important to get an undistorted view, such as cameras or other optical systems, the view can be quite distorted if the thickness of the layer of water varies considerably.In addition, if the surface is cold, the water on the surface can begin to freeze, forming a frost layer that scatters light, Rubner says, adding: “If you’re going to have a sheet of water, how do you prevent it from freezing?”For that purpose, what you really need is a coating that can absorb a lot of water in a form that cannot freeze. Indeed, in many applications it would be i want my girlfriend back have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic traits in the same material. That’s what the team has now done, and they’ve coined a term to describe this hybrid property: Zwitter wettability.Zwitter, Rubner explains, is a German word for hybrid, used in a number of chemistry terms to describe something that carries two opposite properties at once. In this case, it describes a surface that has the ability to behave as both hydrophobic (to water droplets) and hydrophilic (to gas-phase water molecules).The surface is made by a process called layer-by-layer deposition. In this case, alternating layers of two different polymers — poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(acrylic acid) — are deposited on a glass surface. “The magic of what we do is nanoscale processing,” Rubner explains: producing the layers so as to control their properties almost down to the level of Fibroids-Miracle production process appears relatively easy and inexpensive to carry out on large scales. “These are common polymers,” Rubner says. “They’re well-known and cheap, but brought together in a unique way.” To test the effectiveness of this material, and that of many other alternatives, the team devised a set of extreme tests. For example, they kept samples of the material at minus 20 degrees Celsius for an hour, then exposed them to a very humid environment. While untreated glass, or glass treated with conventional hydrophilic or hydrophobic coatings, quickly develops a layer of frost following such treatment, glass with the new treatment remains clear. However, it still appears to be hydrophobic in the presence of large water droplets.To measure its performance, Lee says, the researchers photographed the glass slides under carefully controlled conditions. “We developed a protocol tinnitus miracle allows us to detect how good one coating is in comparison with another,” he says. Previous testing typically measured the light transmitted through the glass after exposure to humidity, but failed to measure the level of image distortion caused by water condensation. “We came up with a way to measure them not just for transmission, but also distortion,” Lee says.While the new coating outperforms others, it does have one drawback: It’s vanishingly thin, so could be vulnerable to aggressive cleaning or mechanical challenges. For this reason, it may not be useful for applications where it is exposed to harsh environments or to excessive wiping. Another limitation is that the new coating only prevents small amounts of frost buildup; it wouldn’t work where there’s a continuous source of cold water, such as for deicing an airplane wing, Shapeshifter Yoga review Still, that leaves many possible uses: the inside of automobile windshields, safe from both weather and windshield wipers; the inside of grocery stores’ refrigerator cases; and optical systems used in research or in photography. The coating could also be useful on the inner surfaces of double-pane windows, which can become fogged if even a small leak allows outside air into the sealed space.Joseph Schlenoff, a professor of polymer science at Florida State University who was not involved in this work, says, “Everyone knows how inconvenient, or even dangerous, it is to have a cold window or lens fog up when water condenses on it. The MIT group has devised a practical and effective method of combatting the fogging problem using a new ultrathin polymer film.”Schlenoff adds, “Both the materials themselves and the techniques used to explore trademiner are highly innovative. These MIT engineers are literally helping us to see technology more clearly.”The work was supported by Samsung and by the National Science Foundation. The nation's top transportation official yesterday announced steps that she said will improve oversight of airlines' compliance with safety mandates and ensure that last week's mass groundings and flight cancellations do not recur. An experiment in which a Trend Micro researcher set up two instances of an Internet-based simulation of an industrial-control system (ICS) for a nonexistent water-pump facility in rural Missouri found the simulated system was targeted 17 times over about four months in ways that would have been catastrophic if it had been a real waterworks operation. From MIT World Angela Adams’s new Landscape collection was inspired by woodlands, harbors, gardens and dunes.     Pepco has hired two prominent vision without glasses review extensive political experience to head what the company called "blue ribbon panels" to examine the utility's reliability problems in a series of public meetings in Prince George's County and the District. BEIJING - People here might be forgiven for feeling self-important after President Obama mentioned China four separate times in his State of the Union speech. The American team begins play in the regional championship against Belize in Portland, Ore., on July 9.     Many of the investors who are expected to participate in the stock program are the same executives who were running the banks at the time of their crisis.     Quick Study: Acupuncture helps some kids with lazy eye. Aaron Moser, one of four sons of the name-supplying founder of Thos. Moser, answers questions about furnishing the George W. Bush Presidential Center.     To many directory of ezine the Obama administration, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government's mortgage giants, are ill. But rather than healing them, both sides agree that the companies should be left to die and that their support for the housing market should wither away. Paul Pierce had 18 points and 11 rebounds, and Avery Bradley scored 22 points to lead the Celtics to a 109-101 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Wednesday. Li Keqiang entered the job on Friday, inheriting a wobbling economy that could distract the government from its vows to tackle pollution and promote urbanization. EARLIER ON THE FIX: What George W. Bush meant for politics The eight best photos from the George W. Bush library dedication Why the gun bill failed — in one more chart Read full article

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/06, 4:22 PM

    Jason Zucker scored at 2:15 of overtime to give Minnesota a 3-2 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks on Sunday, pulling the Wild within 2-1 in the Western Conference quarterfinal series.     In an address at Ohio State, the president said government critics “gum up the works,” and said he was optimistic about young people’s opportunities.    Who needs to wait another three years to choose America’s second-in-command? Not HBO, that’s for sure.     Susan Phillips is an energy reporter and multimedia journalist with StateImpact Pennsylvania, a collaboration between NPR, WHYY and WITF. President Obama on Thursday praised a man he has often criticized, hailing former president George W. Bush for working across the aisle and saying Bush will get credit if Congress can pass immigration reform this year. Read full article >>     In a televised speech ahead of planned weekend demonstrations by his opponents, President Mohamed Morsi pledged to introduce “radical and quick” reforms.     Jonathan Sanchez pitched three strong innings and Garrett Jones and Ivan DeJesus Jr. each had two hits in the Pittsburgh Pirates' 3-2 exhibition victory over the Houston Astros on Friday. A tired Knicks team eliminated the Celtics, but they know that the second round will be even tougher against a rugged Pacers front line with younger legs.     To coincide with its 100th anniversary, the manufacturer of luxurious leather furniture has officially inaugurated its museum in central Italy. Disappearing ice causes populations to explode VIENNA - In an underground chamber near the Iranian city of Natanz, a network of surveillance cameras offers the outside Fibroids Miracle download rare glimpse into Iran's largest nuclear facility. The cameras were installed by U.N. inspectors to keep tabs on Iran's nuclear progress, but last year they recorded s... The mayor spoke Wednesday night at a celebration of the newspaper’s 125th anniversary, calling it “my second favorite financial news outlet.”     Nazem Kadri and James Reimer kept Toronto in the game before the rest of the Maple Leafs won it in the third period. One thing is for sure, when there's a disaster in the U.S. or abroad there's an appeal to help victims. • Manager to meet Wolves owner after Brighton defeat• Saunders oversaw only five wins in 20 gamesThe Wolves owner Steve Morgan made no mention of his manager, Dean Saunders, in the apologetic statement he issued several hours after his club's second successive relegation was confirmed on Saturday.Whether this means Saunders still has a future at Molineux the former Aston Villa and Liverpool striker will find out on Monday, when he meets Morgan and the chief executive, Jez Moxey, to discuss the rebuilding process that Saunders insisted began when the final whistle blew at the Amex Stadium.He has yet to convince many of the club's supporters. Losing key players including the striker Sylvan Ebanks-Blake to injury has been a factor in Wolves winning only five of his 20 games in charge, but Saunders's selections and tactics have often been hard to understand.This match was a case in point. Judging by the dismayed comments on social media, Stephen Hunt and Bjorn Sigurdarson have been tinnitusmiracle club's best players in recent weeks, but both were on the bench, while Bakary Sako, who Saunders admitted afterwards was only "half-fit", started a game the outcome of which felt decided from the moment Kazenga LuaLua scored after barely five minutes. The Brighton winger's second shortly before half-time confirmed the inevitable, and the ease with which Gus Poyet's side saw the game out, husbanding their resources for the forthcoming play-off semi-final against Crystal Palace, was another embarrassment in a humiliating season for the old gold.Saunders, unsurprisingly, made the case for managerial stability. "Look, if you had four managers in Boots the chemist and asked the staff how they feel, they wouldn't know whether they were coming or going: this manager liked what I was doing, this manager doesn't, am I doing the right thing, am I in the right place."The worst thing you can have at a club is uncertainty. Someone has to do the job. I'm up for it and I'm going to get on with it," he said.Morgan indicated money would be made available for rebuilding "within the confines of the Football League Financial Fair Play system", but bringing in younger players through the club's academy had to be a large part of the way forward.Wolves are also due to receive another £16m parachute payment, though with a wage bill touching £25m, and falling attendance and commercial revenues, there will surely be a lot more going than coming at Molineux over the summer.Saunders declined to discuss names, though Jamie O'Hara, constantly natural vitiligo treatment the supporters of his reputed £40,000 a week wages and booed every time he touched the ball, has surely played his last game for the club. The former Spurs midfielder gestured in return and, when his team-mates shuffled awkwardly over to applaud the fans at the end of the game, marched down the tunnel without a backward glance.The contrast with what is going on at Brighton could hardly have been more marked, and Saunders cited the Seagulls, not so very long ago groundless and penniless, as an example of how crisis usually contains opportunity."We have been here nearly three seasons and you can see there is a plan, players understand the way we want to play," said Poyet. "When you maintain a group of key players and staff, it's better, everybody knows that. We are in a great moment as a team and as a club. We finished ahead of Palace, and we need to prove we are the better team. Being Palace there is an extra edge to the games, and we need to control that."Man of the match Kazenga LuaLua (Brighton).ChampionshipBrighton & Hove AlbionWolverhampton WanderersRichard Raeguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     • Somerset 358-6 v WarwickshireIt was green below and grey above but Marcus Trescothick, after a bit of agonising, chose to bat and at the end of the day he was happy with his decision. Somerset trademiner review placed and Alviro Petersen had hit his second century in three innings – in the other knock he hit a paltry 91.At Essex in 2012 Petersen averaged 21; it looks as if he may surpass that this time. For some reason overseas batsmen like Taunton. When he was superbly caught at second slip by Rikki Clarke for 136, his tally for the season had reached 394.Somerset were faltering at 143 for four but for the second time this term Petersen found an accomplished ally in Jos Buttler. He contributed a calm, cultured and unbeaten 90 in front of Ashley Giles, England's one-day coach, who was perched on top of the old pavilion for much of the day alongside his successor at Warwickshire, Dougie Brown.Buttler caressed the ball around Taunton. There were no reverse hits or scoops, only orthodox cricket strokes as he cruised along in Petersen's wake. Giles was delighted by Buttler's innings.Despite the verdant pitch and threatening clouds shrouding the Quantocks early on, Trescothick and Nick Compton compiled a century partnership. They needed some luck and a lot of skill. Chris Woakes bowled some fine deliveries; Clarke felled Trescothick with a bouncer. However, it was Jeetan Patel, the off-spinner, who broke the partnership just before lunch.Trescothick is rightly revered as a player of spin bowling, but at The Oval last week and at Taunton on Thursday he was lbw to the first off-break he received. This is a mystery that he will solve, but even he will have a few jitters when forex growth bot up to his next off-break.Compton batted with assurance and departed with dignity in the over after Trescothick's dismissal. This match is televised and it was soon evident that Compton had nicked the ball from Clarke, to which he was given lbw. He headed off without too much fuss.Neither James Hildreth, caught at square-leg off a surprise bouncer from Woakes, nor Craig Kieswetter, vainly seeking a first run from his 17th ball, could bed in. But Buttler could alongside Petersen in a 193-run partnership. The Warwickshire attack was hampered by the fact that the radar of their newcomer, Oliver Hannon-Dalby, was faulty. He kept bowling at Petersen's leg-stump, which, as county bowlers are discovering, is a bad idea.County Championship 2013 Division OneCounty Championship Division OneSomersetWarwickshireCricketVic Marksguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Six months of hanging out in smoky, grungy "genbas," or Japanese hip-hop clubs, gave cultural anthropologist Ian Condry insight into how American rap music and attitudes were being transformed by the youth in Japan. But he couldn't figure out the mirror balls. Every club, from large to small, had a mirror ball that sent glittering light into the sweaty haze above the Japanese hip-hop fans, artists, music executives and first-timers. So "I had to develop my own philosophy of the mirror ball," Condry, associate professor of Japanese cultural studies, told an audience on March 1 during a discussion of vision without glasses book, "Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization" (2006, Duke University Press). That philosophy highlights the relationships within the hip-hop community, he explained. The mirror ball illuminated "no single star on stage but rather spotlighting and then passing over all of the participants," Condry said, reading from his book. "The dynamic interaction among all these actors is what brings a club scene to life. Mirror balls evoke this multiplicity, splashing attention on each individual for a moment and then moving on--not unlike the furtive glances of desire between clubbers in a zone of intimate anonymity." Such details were crucial to Condry's insight into how affluent Japanese youth had transformed the music that came straight out of Compton into something distinctly Japanese. "The evolution of the Japanese hip-hop scene reveals a path of globalization that differs markedly from the spread of cultural styles driven by major corporations such as Disney, McDonald's and Wal-Mart,'' Condry said. "Indeed hip-hop in Japan is illuminating precisely because it was initially dismissed as a transient fad by major corporations and yet took root as a popular style, nevertheless." Condry's talk was part of "Cool Japan: Media, Culture, Technology," a Feb. 28-March 3 conference at MIT and Harvard that explored the power and significance of Japanese popular culture.To illustrate his points, Condry played the video of the song "911" by King Giddra, a Japanese hip-hop group named after a three-headed monster in the Godzilla movie series. The video movingly juxtaposed images of Hiroshima with the destruction of the directory of ezines Center on Sept. 11, 2001, as the group rapped about the elusive nature of world peace.Japanese hip-hop--which Condry sees as having the four basic elements of rapping, deejaying, break dancing and graffiti art--quickly jettisoned the use of English, which had lingered in rock music. Japanese rapping has almost no talk of guns and very little mention of drugs but incorporates images of samurai or uses Kabuki performance style and often focuses on global political issues. Yet bravado remains crucial: One female rapper uses the eighth-century poetry style of waka; "yet she does it to say, 'I'm the number one rapper and I can beat the boys,'" Condry said. Japanese rappers say they're not into American culture, Condry explained in an interview. "They say they're into black culture. They say, 'I don't care abut America per se. But I love Spike Lee movies and I read the autobiography of Malcolm X … and I appreciate what black Americans have struggled to achieve.'''In the late 1990s, Japanese rap became more commercialized but a wide underground hip-hop movement also emerged, which spread throughout the country among a wide range of social and economic backgrounds. Only in the last four or five years, have "poor Japanese found a voice in hip-hop," he said.Condry admitted, with a laugh, that there were moments when hanging out in the genbas when he wondered if this was appropriate field work for a cultural anthropologist. Of course, he loves surveys as much as the next academic, but "You become part of the Shapeshifter Yoga review see what's important to them," he said. "To get into that world, you need to learn a lot." He also admitted that the Japanese hip-hop fans began to imitate him, although politeness prevented them from showing him how he was copied. The "Cool Japan" conference was sponsored by the MIT Japan Program, Harvard's Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, the Harvard Asia Center, MIT Foreign Languages and Literatures and MIT Comparative Media Studies. This word has appeared in six New York Times articles in the past year. Even if health care reform in Massachusetts has had a limited effect on employment, the impact of the Affordable Care Act on the national labor market is likely to be large. At least 37 gold miners died and many others were injured in the Central African Republic when a pit in which they were working collapsed after heavy rains.     U.S. stocks inched up last week, overcoming concern that credit losses will rise, as data on jobless claims and retail sales signaled the economic recovery is strengthening. Wishful thinking on improving school food is full of cliches and hyperbole that fails to recognise 60 years of researchThe proposal for the independent school food plan recognises the importance of food in children's health and welfare. It says it aims to increase the number of children eating good food and to support cooking and vegetable-growing initiatives in schools. All admirable aims that I, and others, have been working on for nearly 20 years. So why have I got reservations?The proposals i want my girlfriend back reform of school food are fraught with difficulty, claims and counterclaims. They seem to be based on wishful thinking rather than evidence, and designed to avoid constructive feedback. The website is a series of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland claims and assertions full of cliches and hyperbole, but it is not clear who is the Mad Hatter or the Queen of Hearts.There seems to be a lack of recognition of 60 years of research evidence in this area, and a number of questions remain to be addressed.The claims for school food and educational attainment are vastly overinflated and based on anecdotal or single case studies. The reality is that schools that introduce improved school food rarely do so in the absence of educational initiatives.There is of course a case for ensuring that children do not go hungry and thus lack concentration. This should be considered a duty of care and one that the founders of the welfare state, such as Richard Titmuss, saw as a social duty. The academic evidence of the impact of nutrition on educational attainment is poor.In much the same way skills and knowledge, such as those related to cooking and growing, are not on their own sufficient to address wider social and food inequalities. They are a necessary and important part of any well-rounded curriculum, but acquisition of such skills does not change the circumstances in which people live.Education, healthcare and other public services account for 29% of meals served outside the home, but only for 6% of sales of Pregnancy Miracle pdf with 9 million schoolchildren to whom 3.25m meals are served every day. For too long this chronic underinvestment has been ignored in favour of an approach seeking efficiencies in the system, essentially a lowering of investment and costs.The fudging, on the website, around nutrient standards and regulation is based on an assumption that headteachers need freedom to manage their own schools. The evidence is clear – regulation and setting standards which are enforceable lead to change. By setting standards this provides a clear boundary and targets to achieve.The current nutrient standards are based on science and while they may need some updating they should not be thrown in the dustbin. The fact is that nutrient standards are about the food that students consume and not about some unobtainable standards which headteachers and caterers are expected to achieve.School food can at best be a sticking plaster in the current round of decisions and cuts that families are making with respect to food every day. Lunches, breakfast clubs and free school fruit are all important but only part of a wider picture. It is hoped that the expert panel in its deliberations locates their considerations within this wider environment of change.School mealsSchoolsFood scienceNutritionMartin Caraherguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Sadie Benning’s small show at Callicoon Fine Arts includes paintings, video and a gouache.     Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says American intelligence analysts have determined that Syria used chemical

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    on 2013/11/06, 4:16 PM

    • 'LLDC have not stuck by their own rules,' says Hearn• Orient want West Ham to share Olympic StadiumThe Leyton Orient chairman, Barry Hearn, has launched proceedings for a judicial review over the decision to allow West Ham to seek sole tenancy rights to the Olympic Stadium.Hearn believes the London Legacy Development Corporation has broken its own rules in now allowing the League One club to be "teamed" with the Hammers in the bidding process. Hearn, who wants his own club and the Hammers to become joint tenants of the £429m stadium, has repeated his claim that the O's will have no future if the Hammers move in.Hearn told his club's official website: "I was concerned that this was a done deal for West Ham before the bidding began, but the fact that both clubs had to commit to teaming made me believe that we were getting involved in a fair process. However, the LLDC have not stuck by their own rules and have left Orient with no option but to challenge their decision in the Courts."We don't intend to interfere with West Ham's residency at the stadium, but maintain the position that if they are going to be there, then we need to be there too. As I have said many times before, if West Ham move to the stadium and we are left a mile up the road, Leyton Orient will not survive."Hearn was also part of a judicial review in 2011, which included Tottenham and resulted in the process of awarding tenancy rights to the stadium being abandoned. The LLDC board, which is tasked with sorting out the stadium's future, named West Ham as the number one choice to move Fibroids Miracle download Olympic Stadium in December.An LLDC spokesman said: "We have been notified that Leyton Orient have made the decision to issue proceedings for judicial review. Whilst this is disappointing, we believe that our processes have been robust, fair and transparent and that the challenge is misconceived."Olympic StadiumLeyton OrientWest Ham Unitedguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Venezuela said on Thursday it had found the crashed plane of Italian fashion executive Vittorio Missoni that went missing in January after taking off from the Los Roques archipelago in the Caribbean six months ago.    At a fund-raiser in Dallas, the president renewed his commitment to bipartisanship despite the divisions in Washington and “even if some of you think I’m a sap.”     The San Antonio Spurs kept insisting the playoffs were a new season and that their woeful finish to the regular season was not as grave as it appeared.     Penny Arcade spent a good part of last week with its foot in its mouth.     Voters in Venezuela stopped President Hugo Chavez from obtaining the two-thirds majority the populist leader said he needed in the National Assembly to effortlessly continue his transformation of Venezuela into a socialist state. Stress levels are straining relationships and having a negative effect on wellbeing, according to Teachers Assurance surveyOn reading the latest report on teachers' stress levels, weary sense of deja vu descended. The survey by Teachers Assurance reveals that 76% of teachers believe that workplace stress is making them ill, with 56% believing they would do a better job if they were less stressed. In addition, 40% tinnitusmiracle argue more with their partners and friends as a result of the pressures they face and 83% said they feel constantly exhausted because of work.Such findings, while dramatic, are not new. In fact, the results of last year's, Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL's) survey of members' wellbeing were remarkably similar. 73% of those surveyed stated that their job was having a negative impact on their wellbeing, with 64% feeling that their professional ability and confidence was being damaged. Almost the same number believed their relationships at home were suffering because of work demands. Even the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) acknowledged in a recent report that teachers are second only to social workers as being the most stressed workers in the land."But what about all those school holidays?" is a refrain every teacher has heard time and time again. "I wouldn't mind finishing at 3pm for the day" is another gem. "We're all stressed" is perhaps a more understandable response to any report suggesting that one group of workers has it harder than another. And true, it's not a competition. ATL could talk all day about the about the pressures our members face – the spiralling workloads, the fear of an Ofsted inspection, criticism from every quarter, the systematic dismantling of pay and conditions built up over 30 years, presided over by a man who doesn't like teachers (hello Mr Gove). However, we recognise that this is a difficult time for everybody. Austerity measures and public sector cuts mean that work-related stress is a feature of most workplaces and not just the preserve of the classroom or lecture hall. So what can be done? How can stress be tackled at natural vitiligo treatment level rather than treated, as is so often done in education, as an individual failing?Well for a start, employers should remember that they have a legal duty to protect their workers' health as well as their safety. Of the estimated 27m days lost in the UK each year to ill health, 23m can be attributed to work-related illnesses, including stress. The remaining 4m is due to workplace injury.ATL believes it is essential that workplace health and safety policies should not just be confined to preventing injury – as important as that is. They must also address those factors that are so often cited as stressors by our members. These include workload, demands of the job, workplace relationships and, particularly relevant at this time, the management of change (this is not new – the HSE Management Standards for Work Related Stress gives advice to employers on all of these factors).But policies and procedures are not enough. Proper health and safety enforcement is vital if these are to be anything more than paper exercises. ATL supports the TUC's recently published manifesto Time for Change: A Trade Union Manifesto for reclaiming health and safety at work, particularly in its call for all workplaces to be inspected regularly to ensure employer compliance with health and safety law. However, the government's slashing of the HSE's budget ("reducing bureaucracy") and the resultant 30% drop in proactive inspections severely undermines this and removes the threat of sanctions that many employers need to take their employees' health and safety seriously.Why should the role of the HSE in protecting teachers' health at work be less important than that of Ofsted's in ensuring that reams of unnecessary paperwork are completed on trademiner review answer, of course, is that it shouldn't. However, as long as this government continues to pursue its change for change's sake agenda and demonstrates callous disregard for the impact on teachers' wellbeing then some things will remain the same. It's also hard to see how it will help attract and retain the best teachers when most are already at their limits.This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. Looking for your next role? Take a look at Guardian jobs for schools for thousands of the latest teaching, leadership and support jobs.SchoolsTeachingWork-life balanceMary Boustedguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     The decision by Egyptian officials to virtually shut down Internet access to the country Friday marked an audacious escalation in the battle between authoritarian governments and tech-savvy protesters. It was also a direct challenge to the Obama administration's attempts to promote Internet freedom. The critic Jon Caramanica and the Internet culture columnist Jenna Wortham examine issues of trust and self raised by the MTV show “Catfish.”     The bride is a lawyer with the Justice Department; the groom is a senior counsel in the Office of the Legislative Counsel of the House of Representatives. Ice Hot, a festival of Nordic dance opening on Wednesday at the Joyce Theater, will expose New York audiences to contemporary dance from Denmark, Norway and Finland. Can you calculate the difference in money spent on student athletes before and after a change was made at Spelman College?     HONG KONG -- Cathay Pacific Airways is ordering 27 new Airbus and Boeing jets to expand services, forex growth bot Asia, and says profit tripled last year to a record. Big East football schools will get almost all of a $110 million pot in a deal that will allow seven departing basketball schools to keep the name Big East and start playing in their own conference next season, a person familiar with the negotiations says. We should all be encouraged to play with our foodWhen you slice a cone the surface produced is either a circle, an ellipse, a parabola or a hyperbola.These curves are known as the conic sections.And when you slice a scone in the shape of a cone, you get a sconic section – the latest craze in edible mathematics, a vibrant new culinary field.On their fabulous website, the folk at Evil Mad Scientist provide a step-by-step guide to baking the sconic sections.In fact, the raspberry jam parabola and the nutella ellipse join a pantry of geometrical foodstuffs guaranteed to liven up afternoon tea.Bread is the perfect medium for creating tangrams – a puzzle in which a square is divided into seven pieces and rearranged to make a variety of shapes, such as a polar bear:And a camel:These images are taken from Dashing Bean, which has several more excellent suggestions, with beautiful pictures, including fish, foxes, birds, pigs and chickens. For some background, here's a video from Maths on Toast that shows you how to make tangrams from, well, toast.Perhaps the most famous dough-based mathematical mouthful, however, is the Möbius bagel, in which a bagel is sliced in such a way as to turn it into two linked parts:The Möbius bagel was thought up by George Hart, and his site provides a full explanation of the steps vision without glasses explains it too:It all makes a change from pi.Food scienceMathematicsBakingFood & drinkAlex Bellosguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     On a party-line vote, the House forced through a stalled farm bill, despite Democratic objections that stripping the food stamp program would leave poor Americans without a safety net.     “The Flick,” Annie Baker’s new work at Playwrights Horizons, focuses on the lives of three workers at a film theater. For the study at Children's Hospital, the sensors were housed in wristbands depicting characters selected by the patients. Image: M. Scott Brauer The New York Islanders clinched an Eastern Conference playoff spot despite a 4-3 shootout loss to the Carolina Hurricanes on Tuesday night.     Ahead of the United States president’s trip to Senegal, The New York Times speaks to activists and residents of Dakar about their hopes for the visit.     A possible merger being negotiated between United Airlines and US Airways would create an airline that dominated the Washington market and could lead to higher ticket prices and fewer flights for passengers traveling to and from the region. Ireland's economy slid into recession late last year and continued to contract sharply in early 2013, new and revised figures showed on Thursday, just months before it is due to exit its EU/IMF bailout programme.     Death toll climbs to 238 amid claims that eight-storey building was put up without correct permits and labour activists call for better protectionForty people have been found alive in the rubble of an eight-storey factory outside the Bangladeshi capital of Dhaka as rescuers desperately tried to reach directory of ezines 36 hours after the building collapsed.Victims were still calling for help from among the piles of shattered concrete slabs, according to rescue workers and volunteers, as hope began to fade for hundreds still trapped. By evening, the death toll stood at 238 with more than 600 injured, many seriously.Army officers in charge of the rescue operation said an estimated 900 people were still missing after the building collapsed at 9am on Wednesday morning, just as the day's work was beginning.High street stores including Primark and Matalan have issued statements confirming that companies working in the Rana Plaza complex, in the suburb of Savar outside Dhaka, had supplied them with clothes. Mango said it had placed an order for samples at the factory which was yet to be fulfilled after activists found clothing labels from the Spanish retailer in the debris.In chaotic scenes hundreds of volunteers combed through the pile of steel and concrete, using electric drills, shovels, crowbars and their bare hands. Outside the complex, hundreds of garment workers gathered, some forming human chains to pass bottles of water and torches to rescuers. Others milled about, angry and tense.Elsewhere in the Savar industrial zone, around 20 miles from the centre of Dhaka, thousands of workers from the hundreds of garment factories demonstrated against poor safety standards. Television reports said hundreds of protesting workers clashed with police in Dhaka and the nearby industrial zone of Ashulia.The disaster in Savar is the worst ever for Bangladesh's booming and powerful garment industry.The exact sequence of events before the collapse is still unclear but it appears local authorities had ordered the building to be evacuated after cracks appeared in walls earlier in the week. A Shapeshifter Yoga review the second floor shut after the warning.The Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA), which represents manufacturers, also said it asked the factories to suspend work from Wednesday morning."After we got the crack reports, we asked them to suspend work until further examination, but they did not pay heed," said Atiqul Islam, the group's president.However, locals claim that garment factory owners then ordered their workers into the building and sent retainers to intimidate those who opposed the decision.Offices of the BGMEA in Dhaka were attacked by angry crowds on Thursday.There are also claims that a second official visited the building but, after a meeting with the owner, said it was safe pending further inspection.Sohel Rana, a local politician with the ruling Awami League, built the complex in 2007. He has disappeared and has not made any comment about the disaster.One volunteer, hair white with dust and sweating profusely, kicked at a loose block of concrete in disgust at the poor quality of the building's construction. "There's hardly any iron in this structure," he said. "Look at that, it's just sand and cement."Rana is also accused of failing to obtain correct permits for the factory from the Rajdhani Unnayan Kartripakkha (Rajuk), the agency in charge of construction safety in Dhaka. Instead, he obtained nominal permission from the chairman of the local municipality, a political ally, it is claimed."It is illegal to construct a building without planning permission," said Emdadul Islam, chief engineer at Rajuk. "The municipality has no right to issue any permissions for construction."Refayet Ullah, the mayor of Savar municipality, confirmed that his office had issued the permit.More than 700 garment workers have died since 2005 in Bangladesh, according to the i want my girlfriend back Rights Forum, a Washington-based advocacy group. But despite promises of reform, say activists, labour laws remain weak and implementation continues to be uneven. No owner has ever been charged over the deaths.Kalpona Akter, executive director of the Bangladesh Centre for Worker Solidarity, said the political influence of garment manufacturers made life difficult for workers. "There are repeated instances of MPs linked to the garment industry blocking stricter legislation," she said.Several million shirts, trousers and other garments were produced each year at the complex. Primark has acknowledged it was using a factory in Rana Plaza, but many other retailers listed as clients by firms in the complex distanced themselves from the disaster, saying they were not involved with the factories at the time of the collapse or had not recently ordered garments from them.Matalan said it used to be supplied by one of the factories at the complex but had no current production there. Benetton said in an email to the Associated Press that people involved in the collapse were not Benetton suppliers. Walmart said it was investigating and Mango said it had only discussed production of a test sample of clothing with one of the factories.A factory fire in November that killed 112 people drew international attention to working conditions in Bangladesh's $20bn-a-year textile industry.Bangladesh's garment industry was the third largest in the world in 2011, after China and Italy. It has grown rapidly over the past decade, a boom fuelled by some of the world's lowest labour costs, and now employs as many as four 4four million people, mainly women. The national minimum wage, which was doubled in 2010, is £19 a month.The Tazreen factory that caught fire in November Pregnancy Miracle pdf exits, and its owner said only three floors of the eight-storey building were legally built. Survivors said gates had been locked and managers had told them to go back to work after the fire alarm went off.The Ethical Trading Initiative, an alliance of businesses, unions and voluntary organisations which aims to improve working conditions, said this week's disaster was "a wake-up call to any responsible brand sourcing from Bangladesh"."The earlier fire and yesterday's tragedy of the building collapse serves to highlight the chronic state of fire and building safety in the country. It is clear that the building inspection regulations are simply not working. Therefore … it falls to sourcing companies to ensure that at least the minimum standards in fire and building safety are achieved," said ETI director Peter McAllister.Shariful Islam, 25, who worked on the seventh floor of Rana Plaza as a quality checker, described how he was returning to work after a meeting with production managers and supervisors when he heard a loud noise."Immediately we fell several stories. I closed my eyes as the entire place was engulfed with dust. A stitching machine fell on my leg," said Shariful, who was pulled from the rubble by co-workers. "All I could see were dead bodies all around me."BangladeshRetail industryFashion industryJason BurkeSimon NevilleSyed Zain Al-Mahmoodguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     PARIS - Top diplomats from some of the world's biggest powers deferred Tuesday to the U.N. Security Council to take action against Libya, as France and Britain failed to win support for a no-fly zone to halt the advance of Moammar Gadhafi's

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    on 2013/11/06, 4:15 PM

    Jason Zucker scored at 2:15 of overtime to give Minnesota a 3-2 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks on Sunday, pulling the Wild within 2-1 in the Western Conference quarterfinal series.     In an address at Ohio State, the president said government critics “gum up the works,” and said he was optimistic about young people’s opportunities.    Who needs to wait another three years to choose America’s second-in-command? Not HBO, that’s for sure.     Susan Phillips is an energy reporter and multimedia journalist with StateImpact Pennsylvania, a collaboration between NPR, WHYY and WITF. President Obama on Thursday praised a man he has often criticized, hailing former president George W. Bush for working across the aisle and saying Bush will get credit if Congress can pass immigration reform this year. Read full article >>     In a televised speech ahead of planned weekend demonstrations by his opponents, President Mohamed Morsi pledged to introduce “radical and quick” reforms.     Jonathan Sanchez pitched three strong innings and Garrett Jones and Ivan DeJesus Jr. each had two hits in the Pittsburgh Pirates' 3-2 exhibition victory over the Houston Astros on Friday. A tired Knicks team eliminated the Celtics, but they know that the second round will be even tougher against a rugged Pacers front line with younger legs.     To coincide with its 100th anniversary, the manufacturer of luxurious leather furniture has officially inaugurated its museum in central Italy. Disappearing ice causes populations to explode VIENNA - In an underground chamber near the Iranian city of Natanz, a network of surveillance cameras offers the outside Fibroids Miracle download rare glimpse into Iran's largest nuclear facility. The cameras were installed by U.N. inspectors to keep tabs on Iran's nuclear progress, but last year they recorded s... The mayor spoke Wednesday night at a celebration of the newspaper’s 125th anniversary, calling it “my second favorite financial news outlet.”     Nazem Kadri and James Reimer kept Toronto in the game before the rest of the Maple Leafs won it in the third period. One thing is for sure, when there's a disaster in the U.S. or abroad there's an appeal to help victims. • Manager to meet Wolves owner after Brighton defeat• Saunders oversaw only five wins in 20 gamesThe Wolves owner Steve Morgan made no mention of his manager, Dean Saunders, in the apologetic statement he issued several hours after his club's second successive relegation was confirmed on Saturday.Whether this means Saunders still has a future at Molineux the former Aston Villa and Liverpool striker will find out on Monday, when he meets Morgan and the chief executive, Jez Moxey, to discuss the rebuilding process that Saunders insisted began when the final whistle blew at the Amex Stadium.He has yet to convince many of the club's supporters. Losing key players including the striker Sylvan Ebanks-Blake to injury has been a factor in Wolves winning only five of his 20 games in charge, but Saunders's selections and tactics have often been hard to understand.This match was a case in point. Judging by the dismayed comments on social media, Stephen Hunt and Bjorn Sigurdarson have been tinnitusmiracle club's best players in recent weeks, but both were on the bench, while Bakary Sako, who Saunders admitted afterwards was only "half-fit", started a game the outcome of which felt decided from the moment Kazenga LuaLua scored after barely five minutes. The Brighton winger's second shortly before half-time confirmed the inevitable, and the ease with which Gus Poyet's side saw the game out, husbanding their resources for the forthcoming play-off semi-final against Crystal Palace, was another embarrassment in a humiliating season for the old gold.Saunders, unsurprisingly, made the case for managerial stability. "Look, if you had four managers in Boots the chemist and asked the staff how they feel, they wouldn't know whether they were coming or going: this manager liked what I was doing, this manager doesn't, am I doing the right thing, am I in the right place."The worst thing you can have at a club is uncertainty. Someone has to do the job. I'm up for it and I'm going to get on with it," he said.Morgan indicated money would be made available for rebuilding "within the confines of the Football League Financial Fair Play system", but bringing in younger players through the club's academy had to be a large part of the way forward.Wolves are also due to receive another £16m parachute payment, though with a wage bill touching £25m, and falling attendance and commercial revenues, there will surely be a lot more going than coming at Molineux over the summer.Saunders declined to discuss names, though Jamie O'Hara, constantly natural vitiligo treatment the supporters of his reputed £40,000 a week wages and booed every time he touched the ball, has surely played his last game for the club. The former Spurs midfielder gestured in return and, when his team-mates shuffled awkwardly over to applaud the fans at the end of the game, marched down the tunnel without a backward glance.The contrast with what is going on at Brighton could hardly have been more marked, and Saunders cited the Seagulls, not so very long ago groundless and penniless, as an example of how crisis usually contains opportunity."We have been here nearly three seasons and you can see there is a plan, players understand the way we want to play," said Poyet. "When you maintain a group of key players and staff, it's better, everybody knows that. We are in a great moment as a team and as a club. We finished ahead of Palace, and we need to prove we are the better team. Being Palace there is an extra edge to the games, and we need to control that."Man of the match Kazenga LuaLua (Brighton).ChampionshipBrighton & Hove AlbionWolverhampton WanderersRichard Raeguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     • Somerset 358-6 v WarwickshireIt was green below and grey above but Marcus Trescothick, after a bit of agonising, chose to bat and at the end of the day he was happy with his decision. Somerset trademiner review placed and Alviro Petersen had hit his second century in three innings – in the other knock he hit a paltry 91.At Essex in 2012 Petersen averaged 21; it looks as if he may surpass that this time. For some reason overseas batsmen like Taunton. When he was superbly caught at second slip by Rikki Clarke for 136, his tally for the season had reached 394.Somerset were faltering at 143 for four but for the second time this term Petersen found an accomplished ally in Jos Buttler. He contributed a calm, cultured and unbeaten 90 in front of Ashley Giles, England's one-day coach, who was perched on top of the old pavilion for much of the day alongside his successor at Warwickshire, Dougie Brown.Buttler caressed the ball around Taunton. There were no reverse hits or scoops, only orthodox cricket strokes as he cruised along in Petersen's wake. Giles was delighted by Buttler's innings.Despite the verdant pitch and threatening clouds shrouding the Quantocks early on, Trescothick and Nick Compton compiled a century partnership. They needed some luck and a lot of skill. Chris Woakes bowled some fine deliveries; Clarke felled Trescothick with a bouncer. However, it was Jeetan Patel, the off-spinner, who broke the partnership just before lunch.Trescothick is rightly revered as a player of spin bowling, but at The Oval last week and at Taunton on Thursday he was lbw to the first off-break he received. This is a mystery that he will solve, but even he will have a few jitters when forex growth bot up to his next off-break.Compton batted with assurance and departed with dignity in the over after Trescothick's dismissal. This match is televised and it was soon evident that Compton had nicked the ball from Clarke, to which he was given lbw. He headed off without too much fuss.Neither James Hildreth, caught at square-leg off a surprise bouncer from Woakes, nor Craig Kieswetter, vainly seeking a first run from his 17th ball, could bed in. But Buttler could alongside Petersen in a 193-run partnership. The Warwickshire attack was hampered by the fact that the radar of their newcomer, Oliver Hannon-Dalby, was faulty. He kept bowling at Petersen's leg-stump, which, as county bowlers are discovering, is a bad idea.County Championship 2013 Division OneCounty Championship Division OneSomersetWarwickshireCricketVic Marksguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Six months of hanging out in smoky, grungy "genbas," or Japanese hip-hop clubs, gave cultural anthropologist Ian Condry insight into how American rap music and attitudes were being transformed by the youth in Japan. But he couldn't figure out the mirror balls. Every club, from large to small, had a mirror ball that sent glittering light into the sweaty haze above the Japanese hip-hop fans, artists, music executives and first-timers. So "I had to develop my own philosophy of the mirror ball," Condry, associate professor of Japanese cultural studies, told an audience on March 1 during a discussion of vision without glasses book, "Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization" (2006, Duke University Press). That philosophy highlights the relationships within the hip-hop community, he explained. The mirror ball illuminated "no single star on stage but rather spotlighting and then passing over all of the participants," Condry said, reading from his book. "The dynamic interaction among all these actors is what brings a club scene to life. Mirror balls evoke this multiplicity, splashing attention on each individual for a moment and then moving on--not unlike the furtive glances of desire between clubbers in a zone of intimate anonymity." Such details were crucial to Condry's insight into how affluent Japanese youth had transformed the music that came straight out of Compton into something distinctly Japanese. "The evolution of the Japanese hip-hop scene reveals a path of globalization that differs markedly from the spread of cultural styles driven by major corporations such as Disney, McDonald's and Wal-Mart,'' Condry said. "Indeed hip-hop in Japan is illuminating precisely because it was initially dismissed as a transient fad by major corporations and yet took root as a popular style, nevertheless." Condry's talk was part of "Cool Japan: Media, Culture, Technology," a Feb. 28-March 3 conference at MIT and Harvard that explored the power and significance of Japanese popular culture.To illustrate his points, Condry played the video of the song "911" by King Giddra, a Japanese hip-hop group named after a three-headed monster in the Godzilla movie series. The video movingly juxtaposed images of Hiroshima with the destruction of the directory of ezines Center on Sept. 11, 2001, as the group rapped about the elusive nature of world peace.Japanese hip-hop--which Condry sees as having the four basic elements of rapping, deejaying, break dancing and graffiti art--quickly jettisoned the use of English, which had lingered in rock music. Japanese rapping has almost no talk of guns and very little mention of drugs but incorporates images of samurai or uses Kabuki performance style and often focuses on global political issues. Yet bravado remains crucial: One female rapper uses the eighth-century poetry style of waka; "yet she does it to say, 'I'm the number one rapper and I can beat the boys,'" Condry said. Japanese rappers say they're not into American culture, Condry explained in an interview. "They say they're into black culture. They say, 'I don't care abut America per se. But I love Spike Lee movies and I read the autobiography of Malcolm X … and I appreciate what black Americans have struggled to achieve.'''In the late 1990s, Japanese rap became more commercialized but a wide underground hip-hop movement also emerged, which spread throughout the country among a wide range of social and economic backgrounds. Only in the last four or five years, have "poor Japanese found a voice in hip-hop," he said.Condry admitted, with a laugh, that there were moments when hanging out in the genbas when he wondered if this was appropriate field work for a cultural anthropologist. Of course, he loves surveys as much as the next academic, but "You become part of the Shapeshifter Yoga review see what's important to them," he said. "To get into that world, you need to learn a lot." He also admitted that the Japanese hip-hop fans began to imitate him, although politeness prevented them from showing him how he was copied. The "Cool Japan" conference was sponsored by the MIT Japan Program, Harvard's Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, the Harvard Asia Center, MIT Foreign Languages and Literatures and MIT Comparative Media Studies. This word has appeared in six New York Times articles in the past year. Even if health care reform in Massachusetts has had a limited effect on employment, the impact of the Affordable Care Act on the national labor market is likely to be large. At least 37 gold miners died and many others were injured in the Central African Republic when a pit in which they were working collapsed after heavy rains.     U.S. stocks inched up last week, overcoming concern that credit losses will rise, as data on jobless claims and retail sales signaled the economic recovery is strengthening. Wishful thinking on improving school food is full of cliches and hyperbole that fails to recognise 60 years of researchThe proposal for the independent school food plan recognises the importance of food in children's health and welfare. It says it aims to increase the number of children eating good food and to support cooking and vegetable-growing initiatives in schools. All admirable aims that I, and others, have been working on for nearly 20 years. So why have I got reservations?The proposals i want my girlfriend back reform of school food are fraught with difficulty, claims and counterclaims. They seem to be based on wishful thinking rather than evidence, and designed to avoid constructive feedback. The website is a series of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland claims and assertions full of cliches and hyperbole, but it is not clear who is the Mad Hatter or the Queen of Hearts.There seems to be a lack of recognition of 60 years of research evidence in this area, and a number of questions remain to be addressed.The claims for school food and educational attainment are vastly overinflated and based on anecdotal or single case studies. The reality is that schools that introduce improved school food rarely do so in the absence of educational initiatives.There is of course a case for ensuring that children do not go hungry and thus lack concentration. This should be considered a duty of care and one that the founders of the welfare state, such as Richard Titmuss, saw as a social duty. The academic evidence of the impact of nutrition on educational attainment is poor.In much the same way skills and knowledge, such as those related to cooking and growing, are not on their own sufficient to address wider social and food inequalities. They are a necessary and important part of any well-rounded curriculum, but acquisition of such skills does not change the circumstances in which people live.Education, healthcare and other public services account for 29% of meals served outside the home, but only for 6% of sales of Pregnancy Miracle pdf with 9 million schoolchildren to whom 3.25m meals are served every day. For too long this chronic underinvestment has been ignored in favour of an approach seeking efficiencies in the system, essentially a lowering of investment and costs.The fudging, on the website, around nutrient standards and regulation is based on an assumption that headteachers need freedom to manage their own schools. The evidence is clear – regulation and setting standards which are enforceable lead to change. By setting standards this provides a clear boundary and targets to achieve.The current nutrient standards are based on science and while they may need some updating they should not be thrown in the dustbin. The fact is that nutrient standards are about the food that students consume and not about some unobtainable standards which headteachers and caterers are expected to achieve.School food can at best be a sticking plaster in the current round of decisions and cuts that families are making with respect to food every day. Lunches, breakfast clubs and free school fruit are all important but only part of a wider picture. It is hoped that the expert panel in its deliberations locates their considerations within this wider environment of change.School mealsSchoolsFood scienceNutritionMartin Caraherguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Sadie Benning’s small show at Callicoon Fine Arts includes paintings, video and a gouache.     Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says American intelligence analysts have determined that Syria used chemical

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/06, 4:13 PM

    President Obama on Friday will propose diverting money from oil and gas leases on federal lands to finance research on replacing hydrocarbons in cars and trucks. Thirteen activists arrested last fall for protesting the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy are scheduled to appear in court Friday to face charges rarely pressed against groups protesting at or near federal property.The “Mad Men” creator and show runner talks about Sunday’s episode and a season that put Don Draper through hell.     The Obama administration announced Friday that it is finalizing sanctions against the regime of Libyan strongman Moammar Gaddafi and has temporarily closed the U.S. Embassy in strife-tornTripoli. Francis’ march to the papacy began with the meetings of cardinals that occurred before the conclave. His remarks struck a chord, but he held on to a low profile. Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire have each played well this season for the Knicks. Just not when they’re on the court together. I am a fitness equipment nut. But my husband has learned not to let me near sporting goods stores, and I know better than to let late-night TV purchases drain my wallet and clutter my closets . . . anymore. Instead, to maintain my habit and my marriage, I've conned Hubby into thinking that we're bonding over building projects when really I'm just using him to get gym equipment on the cheap. Hence, my homemade "crafty" Fibroids Miracle download best N.B.A. games of the week include the Thunder at Knicks, Grizzlies at Cavaliers and Rockets at Warriors. The PIAXP participants brought to their mission a wide variety of backgrounds and perspectives. The entrants included garage entrepreneurs, race enthusiasts, families, university teams, high school teams and startup companies. Individuals of all ages participated, many with undergraduate and some with graduate degrees. And they represented a surprising range of expertise, including mechanical and electrical engineering, as well as finance, computer science and some life sciences. While theoretical analyses do not stress the benefits of focusing diverse perspectives on a problem, that approach provides a clear advantage when the range of possible solutions is hard to predict.Why did the PIAXP attract such a diverse group? While most discussions of innovation focus on monetary rewards, prizes in fact offer multiple incentives that appeal to different kinds of people. In responding to surveys, PIAXP entrants said that they were inspired by the opportunity to get publicity, to develop new markets, to have fun, and more. Indeed, for many respondents, winning wasn’t a significant motivator. So the fact that they spent more than the prize purse is not necessarily an indicator of inefficiency (see chart below). They were getting other benefits from participating. This week, a feast at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden for the Japanese cherry blossom festival, English pork pies and pricey ice cream from tinnitusmiracle Marilyn M. Wolfson SM '83, PhD '90, associate leader of the Weather Sensing Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, has been named a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). She was recognized for “outstanding contributions to the atmospheric or related oceanic or hydrologic sciences, or their applications, during a substantial period of years.”The AMS promotes the development and sharing of information on the atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic sciences. The society also encourages the advancement of professional applications of these sciences. Annually, a maximum of only 0.2 percent of the AMS membership is elevated to the grade of fellow.Wolfson, who joined Lincoln Laboratory in 1983, directs the laboratory’s aviation weather efforts. Currently, her group is focused on increasing the year-round accuracy of the short-term (zero to eight hours) forecast products, and transferring this technology to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for system acquisition. Important research problems also under investigation for the FAA’s Next Generation Air Traffic System include anticipating the impact of storms on air traffic capacity and demand, and coupling this information functionally to traffic flow management.Wolfson holds a BS in atmospheric and oceanic science from the University of Michigan and both SM and PhD degrees from MIT, where she was named an Ida M. Green Fellow. She received the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence award in 2005 for “her work in the application of meteorology to the problem natural vitiligo treatment air traffic control and for her national-level role in the application of advanced convection weather forecasts for use in the aviation community.” She has served on four National Academy of Sciences committees and has written numerous scientific papers and journal articles. Our intrepid blogger is back with her Swedish club team after playing for the U.S. in friendly matches at home and competing in the Algarve Cup in Portugal. Ever since the first satellites were sent to the moon to scout landing sites for Apollo astronauts, scientists have noticed a peculiar phenomenon: As these probes orbited the moon, passing over certain craters and impact basins, they periodically veered off course, plummeting toward the lunar surface before pulling back up. As it turns out, the cause of such bumpy orbits was the moon itself: Over the years, scientists have observed that its gravity is stronger in some regions than others, creating a “lumpy” gravitational field. In particular, a handful of impact basins exhibit unexpectedly strong gravitational pull. Scientists have suspected that the explanation has to do with an excess distribution of mass below the lunar surface, and have dubbed these regions mass concentrations, or “mascons.”  Exactly how these mascons came to be has remained a mystery — until now. Using high-resolution gravity data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, researchers at MIT and Purdue University have mapped the structure trademiner review lunar mascons and found that their gravitational fields resemble a bull’s-eye pattern: a center of strong, or positive, gravity surrounded by alternating rings of negative and positive gravity.To figure out what caused this gravitational pattern, the team created simulations of lunar impacts, along with their geological repercussions in the moon’s crust and mantle, over both the short- and long-term. They found that the simulations reproduced the bull’s-eye pattern under just one scenario. When an asteroid crashes into the moon, it sends material flying out, creating a dense band of debris around the crater’s perimeter. The impact sends a shockwave through the moon’s interior, reverberating within the crust and producing a counterwave that draws dense material from the lunar mantle toward the surface, creating a dense center within the crater. After hundreds of millions of years, the surface cools and relaxes, creating a bull’s-eye that matches today’s gravitational pattern. This tumultuous chain of events likely gave way to today’s lunar mascons, says Maria Zuber, the E.A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences. “For the first time, we have a holistic understanding of the process that forms mascons,” says Zuber, who is also GRAIL’s principal investigator, and MIT’s vice president for research. “There will be more details that emerge for sure, but the quality of the GRAIL data enabled rapid progress on this longstanding question.” Zuber forex growth bot colleagues have published their results this week in Science. Mapping a bumpy rideFrom January to December 2012, GRAIL’s twin probes, Ebb and Flow, orbited in tandem around the moon, mapping its gravitational field by measuring the changing distance between themselves — a real-time indication of the strength of the moon’s gravitational pull. As the probes got closer to the moon’s surface toward the end of the mission, Zuber recalls, engineers had to adjust the probes’ orbits to counteract the tug of lunar mascons. “Because the moon’s gravity field is so bumpy, we would put the two spacecraft in a circular orbit, and the orbits immediately became elliptical because the spacecraft got tugged out of their orbit,” Zuber says. “We were always within a week of crashing.” Despite the impending threat of impact, the probes gathered high-resolution measurements, which Zuber and the GRAIL science team have since translated into detailed gravitational maps. These maps also gave scientists precise measurements of the thickness of lunar crust in any given region of the moon, which Purdue’s Jay Melosh integrated into impact simulations. Melosh simulated the process of lunar impacts in two similarly sized basins on the near side of the moon — one with lava deposits, the other without. Melosh fed the crustal thicknesses from both basins into the model, then ran the simulation to see how the same impact would affect each region. vision without glasses measurements from GRAIL, the basin containing central lava deposits had a thinner crust than the other basin. After running their simulations, the researchers found that an impact had created a gravitational bull’s-eye pattern in the first basin, but not the second — predictions that matched GRAIL’s measurements. Making an impactWhy the difference in gravitational signatures? The answer, the group found, lay in the crust’s thickness at the time of impact: Impacts to regions with thinner crust do more damage, easily sending shockwaves into the denser, underlying mantle — which, in turn, draws more dense material to the surface, creating a mascon. Regions with thicker crust, by contrast, are more resistant to impacts and internal upheaval. “Large impacts happen in seconds to hours,” Zuber says. “The process of how the crust cools off and recovers from such a devastating event, that’s hundreds of millions of years. So we let these models run through time until the surface cools and relaxes. Then what you’re left with is today’s gravity.” The results from the group’s simulations precisely matched GRAIL’s actual gravity measurements, giving scientists confidence that the simulated impact scenario is indeed what formed the lunar mascons. While most scientists agree that the moon’s mascons likely arose from large impacts, Laurent Montesi, an associate professor of geology at the University of Maryland, says the precise processes that led to the formation of the mascons directory of ezines a mystery since their discovery 45 years ago. “This paper finally proposes an answer to this longstanding puzzle by including a start-to-finish model of mascon formation,” says Montesi, who did not contribute to this research. “It is now clear that geological processes occurring over millions of years are needed to turn the structure produced immediately by the impact into a mascon. It is remarkable how well the models in the paper reproduce the observed structures.” Zuber says that knowing what gave rise to lunar mascons may help us understand the evolution of the moon, as well as other planets. The mascons likely formed during a period known as the Late Heavy Bombardment, when the early solar system endured a blitz of interplanetary collisions. The Earth may have undergone even more impacts than the moon, although the resulting craters have since been erased by erosion and plate tectonics. Studying the repercussions of impacts on the moon therefore might offer clues to Earth’s origins. “This was a very inhospitable time to be at the surface of a planet,” Zuber says. “The tail end of this process is when the first single-celled organisms emerged on Earth. So knowing what the effect of the impacts was on the thermal state of a planet that early tells us about the extreme conditions under which life on Earth took hold." Don’t believe what they say. Money can Shapeshifter Yoga review It’s yours for the price of a ticket to “The Book of Mormon.” And if you’re already in possession of one, then you’ve wisely secured a seat in the premier-class cabin of delirium. Read full article >>     A solitary goal by Egemen Korkmaz guided Fenerbahce to a narrow victory in the first leg of their Europa League semi-final against Benfica in Istanbul.Korkmaz's goal 18 minutes from time was scant reward for the Turkish side, who could have taken a more commanding lead to Portugal after Cristian Baroni hit a first-half penalty against a post and Moussa Sow and Dirk Kuyt also rattled the frame of the goal."Normally we are a team that delivers when we find opportunities, but tonight we couldn't do that," Benfica's coach Jorge Jesus said. "But the result is not too bad, we will remain hopeful until the last minute of the second leg. We will be much better in Lisbon."Roared on by a raucous crowd, Fenerbahce played at a high tempo from the start as Benfica struggled to settle. Sow, who will miss the second leg after being shown a yellow card, soon struck the crossbar and Fenerbahce maintained the pressure. When Ola John clipped the trailing leg of Gokhan Gonul just before half-time Fenerbahce were awarded a penalty, but Cristian failed to convert it.When Dirk Kuyt also hit a post in the second half it looked i want my girlfriend back a frustrating night for the home side but Korkmaz raised the roof when he finally broke the deadlock after a poor defensive header.Benfica's best chance came when Nicolás Gaitán curled a shot against the outside of a post but Fenerbahce held on for the victory despite some anxious moments.Fenerbahce will also go into the second leg without the striker Webo, stupidly booked for kicking the ball away, and the midfielder Mehmet Topal, who was cautioned. But their coach, Aykut Kocaman, said his team would fight "until the last drop of their blood".He added: "It will be a very difficult game for us there, but we definitely have acquired the 51% chance of reaching the final."His goalkeeper Volkan Demirel was more convincing. "We will win the cup," he told the NTV channel after the game.Europa LeagueFenerbahçeBenficaguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     U.S. stocks fell last week, halting the longest rally in a year, after allegations of fraud at Goldman Sachs Group heightened concern that the government would crack down on Wall Street. The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, which has been facing financial problems and considering possible mergers, said it would stay independent. NEW YORK -- Interest rate worries sent share prices lower Tuesday on Wall Pregnancy Miracle pdf strong consumer confidence and home sales data signaled that the economy is holding up better than expected and suggested that the Federal Reserve has room for more rate increases. -- The earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan on Friday forced multinational companies to close factories, fight fires and move workers, inflicting at least short-term damage on the Japan's fragile economy. The police arrested three men and sought a fourth on Tuesday on hazing charges related to the death of one Virginia State University freshman and the disappearance of another.     Here's a not-so-savory news flash: There are more bacterial cells living in our bodies than human cells. Researchers are learning how the balance of these bugs affects our health, but reaping the benefits of bacteria is not quite as simple as eating probiotic yogurt. That's the gist of "The Good,... After years of battling historic preservationists, the federal government won approval yesterday to build a massive headquarters for the Department of Homeland Security on a 176-acre hilltop site east of the Anacostia River. Bucks readers discuss their experience with a new rule that requires their brokerage firms to report to the I.R.S. the price they paid for certain taxable investments. MEXICO CITY - A ritual is performed when drug lords are arrested here. They are paraded before the news cameras, often with black eyes and fresh bruises, then stand shackled and grimacing between a pair of masked

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/06, 4:11 PM

    THE QUESTION Might giving infants a sweet-tasting sugar solution before immunizations make the shots more bearable? HOUSTON - Authorities say a woman accused of fleeing the country after a fire at her Texas day care facility killed four children has returned to the U.S. following her capture in Nigeria.The Denver Nuggets are really fast. How far will that take them? What parents mean by “part-time” work, why the future of your Nook books is uncertain, free theater in the park (and parking lot) and other consumer-focused news from The New York Times.     MEXICO CITY - President Felipe Calderon acknowledged Thursday that an increasingly bloody war with powerful drug trafficking organizations continues to pose "the central threat" to Mexico. The BBC this week is Fibroids Miracle download of Daniel Day-Lewis’s 1980s television work, a chance to see an Oscar-winning performer in his days of apprenticeship. Classic American style, upgraded, just in time for the Fourth of July.     My favorite teacher, Patrick Welsh, wrote an intriguing essay for USA Today about what he considers an overabundance of high school students going on to college. The same sentiments were expressed in a well-phrased letter from Eugene Morgan of Wheaton, published on The Post's editorial page June 20. Your choice for wireless service would get smaller should AT&T carry out its plan to buy T-Mobile USA. A romance that began with cymbals — well, one, anyway. Over-by-over report: England have struck early on day three in Wellington. Join John Ashdown for the tinnitusmiracle Ashdown Hearings began at The Hague into an Australian suit charging Japan with unlawful practices and with using so-called research as a front for commercial whaling. It seems clear that baseball hit several of the same sad landmarks as the financial world, though arrived at each juncture a bit earlier. He's known simply by his first name -- Jared -- and his claim to fame is being a loser, in fact a super-loser. As the title character in this revival of Martin McDonagh’s dark comedy “The Cripple of Inishmaan” Daniel Radcliffe does something unusual for a star: he blends into the scenery and the ensemble, delivering his finest stage performance to date.     British business, which has a vital interest in the debate natural vitiligo treatment and European integration, should make clear that it wants the government to stick to the center.     European Tour prankster David Lynn is having a whale of a time sharing banter with the fans in the United States this year as he showed when finishing joint fourth at the Honda Classic in Florida last week. Brandon Jennings scored 24 points and Monta Ellis added 21 to help the Milwaukee Bucks hang on for a 102-95 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Tuesday night. Can you identify the subject of the sentence from the article?     When cells suffer too much DNA damage, they are usually forced to undergo programmed cell death, or apoptosis. However, cancer cells often ignore these signals, flourishing even after trademiner review have ravaged their DNA.A new finding from MIT researchers may offer a way to overcome that resistance: The team has identified a key protein involved in an alternative death pathway known as programmed necrosis. Drugs that mimic the effects of this protein could push cancer cells that are resistant to apoptosis into necrosis instead.While apoptosis is a tightly controlled procedure that breaks down and disposes of the dying cell in a very orderly way, necrosis is a messier process in which the cell’s membrane ruptures and its contents spill out.“People really used to think of necrosis as cells just falling apart, that it wasn’t programmed and didn’t require gene products to make it happen,” says Leona Samson, a member of MIT’s Center forex growth bot Health Sciences and Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. “In the last few years it has become more clear that this is an active process that requires proteins to take place.”In the May 10 online edition of the journal Genes and Development, Samson and colleagues report that a protein known as ALKBH7 plays a key role in controlling the programmed necrosis pathway. Dragony Fu, a former postdoc in Samson’s lab, is the paper’s lead author, and postdoc Jennifer Jordan is also an author.Unexpected findingsALKBH7 belongs to a family of proteins first discovered in E. coli about a dozen years ago as part of a DNA-repair mechanism. In humans, there are nine different ALKBH proteins, which Samson’s lab has been studying for several vision without glasses the mammalian ALKBH proteins appear to be involved in DNA repair, similar to the original E. coli version. In particular, they respond to DNA damage caused by alkylating agents. These agents can be found in pollutants such as fuel exhaust and tobacco smoke, and are also used to treat cancer.In the new paper, Samson, a professor of biology and biological engineering, and her colleagues found that ALKBH7 has an unexpected effect. When the researchers lowered ALKBH7 levels in human cells grown in the lab, those cells were much more likely to survive DNA damage than cells with normal ALKBH7 levels. This suggests that ALKBH7 actually promotes cell death.“That was a surprising finding, because previously all of these ALKBH proteins were shown to directory of ezines the cell survive when exposed to damage,” says Fu, who is now a visiting research fellow at the University of Zurich.Upon further investigation, the researchers found that when healthy cells suffer massive DNA damage from alkylating agents, they enter the programmed necrosis pathway. Necrosis, which can also be initiated by bacterial or viral infection, is believed to help the body’s immune system detect threats.“When dying cells release their contents during necrosis, it serves as a warning signal for your body that there is a virus there and recruits macrophages and other immune cells to the area,” Fu says.Potential drug targetsThe findings suggest that when DNA is so badly harmed that cells can’t repair it, the programmed necrosis pathway kicks in to prevent Shapeshifter Yoga review major genetic damage from potentially become cancerous. Other researchers have shown that some types of cancer cells have much lower ALKBH7 levels than normal cells. This suggests that the cancer cells have gained the ability to evade programmed necrosis, helping them to survive, Fu says.The necrosis pathway appears to be initiated by an enzyme called PARP, which becomes hyperactive following DNA damage and shuts down the cell’s production of two molecules that carry energy, ATP and NAD. The MIT team found that ALKBH7 prevents ATP and NAD levels from returning to normal by disrupting the function of mitochondria — the cell structures that generate energy for a cell. Without an adequate supply of those critical energy-carrying molecules, the cell cannot survive and i want my girlfriend back In cells that lack ALKBH7, ATP and NAD levels rebound, and the cells survive, carrying a heavy burden of DNA damage.The researchers are now investigating the molecular details of the programmed necrosis pathway in hopes of identifying ways to activate it in cancer cells. “The observations reported in this paper open up the possibility that novel treatments could be developed to treat tumors that are relatively resistant to killing via the apoptotic pathway,” says Ashok Bhagwat, a professor of chemistry at Wayne State University who was not part of the research team.The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Cancer Society. A man in Taiwan has contracted the H7N9 virus, and officials in the region are taking Pregnancy Miracle pdf prevent spread to their countries. From Olympic Park to the Taj Mahal, Warren Elsmore has used the classic Danish bricks to build architectural masterpieces – and written a definitive book about it, says Rowan MooreRowan Moore     I BEAT THE ODDS From Homelessness to the Blind Side and Beyond By Michael Oher with Don Yaeger Gotham. 250 pp. $26 By the time Michael Oher got around to telling it, The Michael Oher Story was already well-known and seemingly devoid of new angles. Oher, an African American who plays offensive ... The arrests come just one day after a referendum on a draft Constitution and follow months of harsh crackdowns on opposition politicians and civic groups ahead of a presidential

  • koszconma
    on 2013/11/06, 4:08 PM

    Jason Zucker scored at 2:15 of overtime to give Minnesota a 3-2 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks on Sunday, pulling the Wild within 2-1 in the Western Conference quarterfinal series.     In an address at Ohio State, the president said government critics “gum up the works,” and said he was optimistic about young people’s opportunities.    Who needs to wait another three years to choose America’s second-in-command? Not HBO, that’s for sure.     Susan Phillips is an energy reporter and multimedia journalist with StateImpact Pennsylvania, a collaboration between NPR, WHYY and WITF. President Obama on Thursday praised a man he has often criticized, hailing former president George W. Bush for working across the aisle and saying Bush will get credit if Congress can pass immigration reform this year. Read full article >>     In a televised speech ahead of planned weekend demonstrations by his opponents, President Mohamed Morsi pledged to introduce “radical and quick” reforms.     Jonathan Sanchez pitched three strong innings and Garrett Jones and Ivan DeJesus Jr. each had two hits in the Pittsburgh Pirates' 3-2 exhibition victory over the Houston Astros on Friday. A tired Knicks team eliminated the Celtics, but they know that the second round will be even tougher against a rugged Pacers front line with younger legs.     To coincide with its 100th anniversary, the manufacturer of luxurious leather furniture has officially inaugurated its museum in central Italy. Disappearing ice causes populations to explode VIENNA - In an underground chamber near the Iranian city of Natanz, a network of surveillance cameras offers the outside Fibroids Miracle download rare glimpse into Iran's largest nuclear facility. The cameras were installed by U.N. inspectors to keep tabs on Iran's nuclear progress, but last year they recorded s... The mayor spoke Wednesday night at a celebration of the newspaper’s 125th anniversary, calling it “my second favorite financial news outlet.”     Nazem Kadri and James Reimer kept Toronto in the game before the rest of the Maple Leafs won it in the third period. One thing is for sure, when there's a disaster in the U.S. or abroad there's an appeal to help victims. • Manager to meet Wolves owner after Brighton defeat• Saunders oversaw only five wins in 20 gamesThe Wolves owner Steve Morgan made no mention of his manager, Dean Saunders, in the apologetic statement he issued several hours after his club's second successive relegation was confirmed on Saturday.Whether this means Saunders still has a future at Molineux the former Aston Villa and Liverpool striker will find out on Monday, when he meets Morgan and the chief executive, Jez Moxey, to discuss the rebuilding process that Saunders insisted began when the final whistle blew at the Amex Stadium.He has yet to convince many of the club's supporters. Losing key players including the striker Sylvan Ebanks-Blake to injury has been a factor in Wolves winning only five of his 20 games in charge, but Saunders's selections and tactics have often been hard to understand.This match was a case in point. Judging by the dismayed comments on social media, Stephen Hunt and Bjorn Sigurdarson have been tinnitusmiracle club's best players in recent weeks, but both were on the bench, while Bakary Sako, who Saunders admitted afterwards was only "half-fit", started a game the outcome of which felt decided from the moment Kazenga LuaLua scored after barely five minutes. The Brighton winger's second shortly before half-time confirmed the inevitable, and the ease with which Gus Poyet's side saw the game out, husbanding their resources for the forthcoming play-off semi-final against Crystal Palace, was another embarrassment in a humiliating season for the old gold.Saunders, unsurprisingly, made the case for managerial stability. "Look, if you had four managers in Boots the chemist and asked the staff how they feel, they wouldn't know whether they were coming or going: this manager liked what I was doing, this manager doesn't, am I doing the right thing, am I in the right place."The worst thing you can have at a club is uncertainty. Someone has to do the job. I'm up for it and I'm going to get on with it," he said.Morgan indicated money would be made available for rebuilding "within the confines of the Football League Financial Fair Play system", but bringing in younger players through the club's academy had to be a large part of the way forward.Wolves are also due to receive another £16m parachute payment, though with a wage bill touching £25m, and falling attendance and commercial revenues, there will surely be a lot more going than coming at Molineux over the summer.Saunders declined to discuss names, though Jamie O'Hara, constantly natural vitiligo treatment the supporters of his reputed £40,000 a week wages and booed every time he touched the ball, has surely played his last game for the club. The former Spurs midfielder gestured in return and, when his team-mates shuffled awkwardly over to applaud the fans at the end of the game, marched down the tunnel without a backward glance.The contrast with what is going on at Brighton could hardly have been more marked, and Saunders cited the Seagulls, not so very long ago groundless and penniless, as an example of how crisis usually contains opportunity."We have been here nearly three seasons and you can see there is a plan, players understand the way we want to play," said Poyet. "When you maintain a group of key players and staff, it's better, everybody knows that. We are in a great moment as a team and as a club. We finished ahead of Palace, and we need to prove we are the better team. Being Palace there is an extra edge to the games, and we need to control that."Man of the match Kazenga LuaLua (Brighton).ChampionshipBrighton & Hove AlbionWolverhampton WanderersRichard Raeguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     • Somerset 358-6 v WarwickshireIt was green below and grey above but Marcus Trescothick, after a bit of agonising, chose to bat and at the end of the day he was happy with his decision. Somerset trademiner review placed and Alviro Petersen had hit his second century in three innings – in the other knock he hit a paltry 91.At Essex in 2012 Petersen averaged 21; it looks as if he may surpass that this time. For some reason overseas batsmen like Taunton. When he was superbly caught at second slip by Rikki Clarke for 136, his tally for the season had reached 394.Somerset were faltering at 143 for four but for the second time this term Petersen found an accomplished ally in Jos Buttler. He contributed a calm, cultured and unbeaten 90 in front of Ashley Giles, England's one-day coach, who was perched on top of the old pavilion for much of the day alongside his successor at Warwickshire, Dougie Brown.Buttler caressed the ball around Taunton. There were no reverse hits or scoops, only orthodox cricket strokes as he cruised along in Petersen's wake. Giles was delighted by Buttler's innings.Despite the verdant pitch and threatening clouds shrouding the Quantocks early on, Trescothick and Nick Compton compiled a century partnership. They needed some luck and a lot of skill. Chris Woakes bowled some fine deliveries; Clarke felled Trescothick with a bouncer. However, it was Jeetan Patel, the off-spinner, who broke the partnership just before lunch.Trescothick is rightly revered as a player of spin bowling, but at The Oval last week and at Taunton on Thursday he was lbw to the first off-break he received. This is a mystery that he will solve, but even he will have a few jitters when forex growth bot up to his next off-break.Compton batted with assurance and departed with dignity in the over after Trescothick's dismissal. This match is televised and it was soon evident that Compton had nicked the ball from Clarke, to which he was given lbw. He headed off without too much fuss.Neither James Hildreth, caught at square-leg off a surprise bouncer from Woakes, nor Craig Kieswetter, vainly seeking a first run from his 17th ball, could bed in. But Buttler could alongside Petersen in a 193-run partnership. The Warwickshire attack was hampered by the fact that the radar of their newcomer, Oliver Hannon-Dalby, was faulty. He kept bowling at Petersen's leg-stump, which, as county bowlers are discovering, is a bad idea.County Championship 2013 Division OneCounty Championship Division OneSomersetWarwickshireCricketVic Marksguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Six months of hanging out in smoky, grungy "genbas," or Japanese hip-hop clubs, gave cultural anthropologist Ian Condry insight into how American rap music and attitudes were being transformed by the youth in Japan. But he couldn't figure out the mirror balls. Every club, from large to small, had a mirror ball that sent glittering light into the sweaty haze above the Japanese hip-hop fans, artists, music executives and first-timers. So "I had to develop my own philosophy of the mirror ball," Condry, associate professor of Japanese cultural studies, told an audience on March 1 during a discussion of vision without glasses book, "Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization" (2006, Duke University Press). That philosophy highlights the relationships within the hip-hop community, he explained. The mirror ball illuminated "no single star on stage but rather spotlighting and then passing over all of the participants," Condry said, reading from his book. "The dynamic interaction among all these actors is what brings a club scene to life. Mirror balls evoke this multiplicity, splashing attention on each individual for a moment and then moving on--not unlike the furtive glances of desire between clubbers in a zone of intimate anonymity." Such details were crucial to Condry's insight into how affluent Japanese youth had transformed the music that came straight out of Compton into something distinctly Japanese. "The evolution of the Japanese hip-hop scene reveals a path of globalization that differs markedly from the spread of cultural styles driven by major corporations such as Disney, McDonald's and Wal-Mart,'' Condry said. "Indeed hip-hop in Japan is illuminating precisely because it was initially dismissed as a transient fad by major corporations and yet took root as a popular style, nevertheless." Condry's talk was part of "Cool Japan: Media, Culture, Technology," a Feb. 28-March 3 conference at MIT and Harvard that explored the power and significance of Japanese popular culture.To illustrate his points, Condry played the video of the song "911" by King Giddra, a Japanese hip-hop group named after a three-headed monster in the Godzilla movie series. The video movingly juxtaposed images of Hiroshima with the destruction of the directory of ezines Center on Sept. 11, 2001, as the group rapped about the elusive nature of world peace.Japanese hip-hop--which Condry sees as having the four basic elements of rapping, deejaying, break dancing and graffiti art--quickly jettisoned the use of English, which had lingered in rock music. Japanese rapping has almost no talk of guns and very little mention of drugs but incorporates images of samurai or uses Kabuki performance style and often focuses on global political issues. Yet bravado remains crucial: One female rapper uses the eighth-century poetry style of waka; "yet she does it to say, 'I'm the number one rapper and I can beat the boys,'" Condry said. Japanese rappers say they're not into American culture, Condry explained in an interview. "They say they're into black culture. They say, 'I don't care abut America per se. But I love Spike Lee movies and I read the autobiography of Malcolm X … and I appreciate what black Americans have struggled to achieve.'''In the late 1990s, Japanese rap became more commercialized but a wide underground hip-hop movement also emerged, which spread throughout the country among a wide range of social and economic backgrounds. Only in the last four or five years, have "poor Japanese found a voice in hip-hop," he said.Condry admitted, with a laugh, that there were moments when hanging out in the genbas when he wondered if this was appropriate field work for a cultural anthropologist. Of course, he loves surveys as much as the next academic, but "You become part of the Shapeshifter Yoga review see what's important to them," he said. "To get into that world, you need to learn a lot." He also admitted that the Japanese hip-hop fans began to imitate him, although politeness prevented them from showing him how he was copied. The "Cool Japan" conference was sponsored by the MIT Japan Program, Harvard's Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, the Harvard Asia Center, MIT Foreign Languages and Literatures and MIT Comparative Media Studies. This word has appeared in six New York Times articles in the past year. Even if health care reform in Massachusetts has had a limited effect on employment, the impact of the Affordable Care Act on the national labor market is likely to be large. At least 37 gold miners died and many others were injured in the Central African Republic when a pit in which they were working collapsed after heavy rains.     U.S. stocks inched up last week, overcoming concern that credit losses will rise, as data on jobless claims and retail sales signaled the economic recovery is strengthening. Wishful thinking on improving school food is full of cliches and hyperbole that fails to recognise 60 years of researchThe proposal for the independent school food plan recognises the importance of food in children's health and welfare. It says it aims to increase the number of children eating good food and to support cooking and vegetable-growing initiatives in schools. All admirable aims that I, and others, have been working on for nearly 20 years. So why have I got reservations?The proposals i want my girlfriend back reform of school food are fraught with difficulty, claims and counterclaims. They seem to be based on wishful thinking rather than evidence, and designed to avoid constructive feedback. The website is a series of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland claims and assertions full of cliches and hyperbole, but it is not clear who is the Mad Hatter or the Queen of Hearts.There seems to be a lack of recognition of 60 years of research evidence in this area, and a number of questions remain to be addressed.The claims for school food and educational attainment are vastly overinflated and based on anecdotal or single case studies. The reality is that schools that introduce improved school food rarely do so in the absence of educational initiatives.There is of course a case for ensuring that children do not go hungry and thus lack concentration. This should be considered a duty of care and one that the founders of the welfare state, such as Richard Titmuss, saw as a social duty. The academic evidence of the impact of nutrition on educational attainment is poor.In much the same way skills and knowledge, such as those related to cooking and growing, are not on their own sufficient to address wider social and food inequalities. They are a necessary and important part of any well-rounded curriculum, but acquisition of such skills does not change the circumstances in which people live.Education, healthcare and other public services account for 29% of meals served outside the home, but only for 6% of sales of Pregnancy Miracle pdf with 9 million schoolchildren to whom 3.25m meals are served every day. For too long this chronic underinvestment has been ignored in favour of an approach seeking efficiencies in the system, essentially a lowering of investment and costs.The fudging, on the website, around nutrient standards and regulation is based on an assumption that headteachers need freedom to manage their own schools. The evidence is clear – regulation and setting standards which are enforceable lead to change. By setting standards this provides a clear boundary and targets to achieve.The current nutrient standards are based on science and while they may need some updating they should not be thrown in the dustbin. The fact is that nutrient standards are about the food that students consume and not about some unobtainable standards which headteachers and caterers are expected to achieve.School food can at best be a sticking plaster in the current round of decisions and cuts that families are making with respect to food every day. Lunches, breakfast clubs and free school fruit are all important but only part of a wider picture. It is hoped that the expert panel in its deliberations locates their considerations within this wider environment of change.School mealsSchoolsFood scienceNutritionMartin Caraherguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Sadie Benning’s small show at Callicoon Fine Arts includes paintings, video and a gouache.     Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says American intelligence analysts have determined that Syria used chemical

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