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  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 6:42 AM

    The renovated Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam honors its past while displaying the modern sculptures of Henry Moore.     During a debate at City University London in November 2010 about the need for libel reform I said that it would never reach the statute book.Not because it wasn't necessary. Not because it wasn't well intentioned. But because I had no trust in politicians to enact real change to a hugely restrictive law. In spite of MPs spouting a belief in freedom of expression, they have ignored calls for decades to reform libel law. They know it has no resonance on the doorstep, so why bother?Lord (Anthony) Lester begged to disagree with my cynical view of political timidity and apathy. Even ahead of drafting the bill, he was convinced that, this time around, parliament would do the right thing.Over the years since, I have been full of admiration for Lester's piloting of the bill through its various stages and also genuinely delighted that he appeared to be about to prove me wrong. His bill, though regarded by some as not radical enough, was a sensible step towards stopping abuses resulting from legislation dating back to the 19th century. And he looked as if he was on the verge of pulling it off until the eleventh-hour Lords ambush early last month engineered by Lord (David) Puttnam and supported by several Tory peers, such as Lord (Norman) Fowler. In order to stimulate the government to honour its commitment to implement the Leveson report the peers added an amendment to the bill that would introduce a low-cost arbitration system for people who believe they have been libelled or had their privacy compromised.This seemed like a terrific anti-Cameron wheeze at the time. Labour's ennobled ranks were delighted to embarrass the prime minister by recording a massive defeat for the government.But party politics is about to scupper the bill because, as Lisa O'Carroll has reported, Cameron will not proceed with the libel reform bill unless the controversial amendment is dropped.She quoted the eminently sensible John Whittingdale, chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee, as referring to the loss of the reform legislation as "a tragedy" caused by "political gamesmanship."Lester believes that if the bill is not returned to the Commons within the next 10 days it is unlikely to survive into the next legislative calendar.Speaking of his frustration and disappointment should the bill fall, he added: "I think that the public should punish whoever is responsible for killing the bill at the next election."I doubt that. After all, they can't punish everyone involved. Every party - in different ways - is responsible for what has happened. Labour promoted the Lords amendment. The coalition, along with Labour, are responsible for not dealing decisively and transparently with Lord Justice Leveson's proposals. But there is time to rescue this unfortunate turn of events. Cameron and Clegg must make an on-the-record pledge in the Commons to introduce a proper system of low-cost arbitration within an overall Leveson settlement. Labour's leader, Ed Miliband, must accept that promise and ensure the amendment is withdrawn.If not, the defamation bill will fall and freedom of expression for authors, academics and journalists will continue to be inhibited. I most definitely do not want my November 2010 prediction to come true.Media lawDavid CameronEd MilibandNick CleggCity University LondonLeveson reportLord Justice LevesonRoy Greensladeguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More FeedsA typical pair of running shoes generates 30 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to keeping a 100-watt light bulb on for one week, according to a new MIT-led lifecycle assessment. But what’s surprising to researchers isn’t the size of a shoe’s carbon footprint, but where the aquaponics 4 you download that footprint comes from. The researchers found that more than two-thirds of a running shoe’s carbon impact can come from manufacturing processes, with a smaller percentage arising from acquiring or extracting raw materials. This breakdown is expected for more complex products such as electronics, where the energy that goes into manufacturing fine, integrated circuits can outweigh the energy expended in processing raw materials. But for “less-advanced” products — particularly those that don’t require electronic components — the opposite is often the case. So why does a pair of sneakers, which may seem like a relatively simple product, emit so much more carbon dioxide in its manufacturing phase? A team led by Randolph Kirchain, principal research scientist in MIT’s Materials Systems Laboratory, and research scientist Elsa Olivetti broke down the various steps involved in both materials extraction and manufacturing of one pair of running shoes to identify hotspots of greenhouse-gas emissions. The group found that much of the carbon impact came from powering manufacturing plants: A significant portion of the world’s shoe manufacturers are located in China, where coal is the dominant source of electricity. Coal is also typically used to generate steam or run other processes in the plant itself. A typical pair of running shoes comprises 65 discrete parts requiring more than 360 processing steps to assemble, from sewing and cutting to injection molding, foaming and heating. Olivetti, Kirchain and their colleagues found that for these small, light components such processes are energy-intensive — and therefore, carbon-intensive — compared with the energy that goes into making shoe materials, such as polyester and polyurethane. The group’s results, Kirchain says, will help shoe designers identify ways to improve designs and reduce shoes’ carbon footprint. He adds that the findings may also help industries assess the carbon impact of similar consumer products more efficiently. “Understanding environmental footprint is resource intensive. The key is, you need to put your analytical effort into the areas that matter,” Kirchain says. “In general, we found that if you have a product that has a relatively high number of parts and process steps, and that is relatively light [weight], then you want to make sure you don’t overlook manufacturing.” Kirchain and his colleagues have published their results in the Journal of Cleaner Production. The sum of a shoe’s partsIn 2010, nearly 25 billion shoes were purchased around the world, the majority of them manufactured in China and other developing countries. As Kirchain and his co-authors write in their paper, “An industry of that scale and geographic footprint has come under great pressure regarding its social and environmental impact.” In response, companies have started to take account of their products’ greenhouse-gas contributions, in part by measuring the amount of carbon dioxide associated with every process throughout a product’s lifecycle. One such company, ASICS, an athletic equipment company based in Japan, approached Kirchain to perform a lifecycle assessment for a running shoe manufactured in China. The team took a “cradle-to-grave” approach, breaking down every possible greenhouse gas-emitting step: from the point at which the shoes’ raw materials are extracted to the shoes’ demise, whether burned, landfilled or recycled. The researchers divided the shoes’ lifecycle into five major stages: materials, manufacturing, usage, transportation and end-of-life. These last three stages, they found, contributed very little to the product’s carbon footprint. For example, running shoes, unlike electronics, require very little energy to use, aside from the energy needed to infrequently wash the shoes. The bulk of emissions, they found, came from manufacturing. While part of the manufacturing footprint is attributable to a facility’s energy source, other emissions came from processes such as foaming and injection molding of parts of a sneaker’s sole, which expend large amounts of energy in the manufacture of small, lightweight parts. As Kirchain explains it, trademiner pdf a lot of effort going into the molding of the material, but you’re only getting a very small part out of that process.”“What stood out was this manufacturing burden being on par with materials, which we hadn’t seen in similar products,” Olivetti adds. “Part of that is because it’s a synthetic product. If we were looking at a leather shoe, it would be much more materials-driven because of the carbon intensity of leather production.” An improved designIn tallying the carbon emissions from every part of a running shoe’s lifecycle, the researchers were also able to spot places where reductions might be made. For example, they observed that manufacturing facilities tend to throw out unused material. Instead, Kirchain and his colleagues suggest recycling these scraps, as well as combining certain parts of the shoe to eliminate cutting and welding steps. Printing certain features onto a shoe, instead of affixing them as separate fabrics, would also streamline the assembly process. Kirchain and Olivetti view their results as a guide for companies looking to evaluate the impact of similar products. “When people are trying for streamlined approaches to [lifecycle assessments], often they put emphasis on the materials impact, which makes a lot of sense,” Olivetti says. “But we tried to identify a set of characteristics that would point you to making sure you were also looking at the manufacturing side — when it matters.” Vikas Khanna, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, says focusing on the carbon impact from a product’s manufacturing is a needed, though difficult, adjustment for the lifecycle business. “We are often restricted to quantifying the environmental impacts of material production only, since the manufacturing data is either not readily available or proprietary,” says Khanna, who did not participate in the research. He adds that knowing the manufacturing contribution may help companies find more effective ways to reduce a product’s carbon footprint. “It is important to keep in mind that material substitution strategies alone may not be sufficient in reducing the environmental impact of products,” Khanna says. “For example, switching to renewable material sources may alone not be sufficient for products that involve high manufacturing energy requirements." Today's Microsoft reorganization marks another huge win for Julie Larson-Green, the 20-year company veteran whose pluck and team spirit helped her rise from rejected applicant to steward of Microsoft's core mission.     A store benefiting the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center will also serve as a pop-up boutique.     Sheila Wood, husband Phillip and 20-year-old daughter Sophie were found dead in flat on Costa del SolThe Irish woman found dead with her daughter and husband in southern Spain had been suffering from a serious illness.Sheila Wood, her British husband, Phillip, and her 20-year-old daughter Sophie were found dead in their rented apartment on the Costa del Sol on Wednesday after an apparent murder-suicide. It is feared they may have lain dead for a number of days before being discovered.It is understood Sheila Wood had been in poor health. The family had been living in Spain for the past decade.The villa in the coastal resort of Cala de Mijas was sealed off with police tape on Wednesday.The Irish department of foreign affairs confirmed that the mother and daughter were Irish passport holders. Officials are attempting to contact their next of kin. The Foreign Office in London said it was liaising closely with the local police and was ready to provide consular assistance.IrelandSpainEuropeHenry McDonaldguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     In a 90-minute visit to the MIT campus today, British Prime Minister David Cameron met with President L. Rafael Reif and Media Lab director Joichi Ito, forex growth bot and students, and a group of young MIT entrepreneurs.During his visit — which was not publicized in advance due to security concerns — Cameron was presented with a framed set of photos commemorating a collaboration between MIT and the British government during World War II. That effort developed microwave radar systems that could be carried aboard airplanes, providing a key advantage to the Allies in winning the war. Service level agreements in the cloud computing market are skewed in the favor of providers, can be difficult for customers to decipher and in some cases are rigid and non-negotiable. Those are some of the findings from the Cloud Standards Customer Council, a user advocacy group that recently reviewed SLAs from some of the industry’s largest providers.     In these intertwined essays, Cynthia Zarin reflects on love, work and the surprises of time’s passing. A social media editor at Thomson Reuters has been charged with helping Anonymous hack into The Los Angeles Times Web site, British talks on a new method to regulate the press have fallen through, and NBCUniversal News Group put a positive face forward at its upfront. José Mourinho and new faces in the Chelsea squad touch down in Thailand to start a pre-season tour of Asia     William A. Tisdale, the Charles and Hilda Roddey Career Development Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, is a recipient of the 2013 Early Career Award of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy.Across the Office of Basic Energy Sciences divisions, 61 awards were made out of about 770 proposals that went out for peer-review. The $750,000 award will support his work over five years to develop a novel ultrafast microscopy technique for visualizing electronic processes at interfaces in next-generation solar cells. The objective of Tisdale’s research is to explore a novel methodology for visualization of ultrafast electronic processes at interfaces. The method, which is based on optical stimulation, builds upon previous success using spontaneous surface nonlinear optical probes to track the temporal evolution of interfacial electric fields resulting from charge separation across an interface. One goal of the work is to speed signal acquisition by up to seven orders of magnitude so that laser scanning ultrafast microscopy becomes feasible. The ultimate aim is to generate movies of interfacial electronic phenomena occurring on femtosecond timescales and submicron length scales, thereby informing our understanding of disorder, heterogeneity and morphology, and how these factors affect ensemble behavior in photovoltaic, electrochemical and optoelectronic systems. Tisdale joined the MIT faculty in January 2012. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering (magna cum laude) from the University of Delaware in 2005. In July 2010, he completed his Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the University of Minnesota under the joint direction of professors Eray Aydil, David Norris, and Xiaoyang Zhu (Department of Chemistry). Before coming to Chemical Engineering, Tisdale was a postdoctoral associate with Professor Vladimir Bulović in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT, where he studied exciton diffusion and energy transfer in nanostructured thin films.Other MIT faculty members to receive a 2013 Early Career Award are Alfredo Alexander-Katz of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and William Detmold, Liang Fu and Michael Williams from Physics. The Food and Drug Administration is planning an unprecedented effort to gradually reduce the salt consumed each day by Americans, saying that less sodium in everything from soup to nuts would prevent thousands of deaths from hypertension and heart disease. The initiative, to be launched this year,... Lenders have become even less willing to part with their money, further crimping budgets and family spending. The mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe performed songs by Cole Porter, Irving Berlin and Ray Henderson in her solo debut at Carnegie Hall. THE REPORT is chilling. Optimistically titled "U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team Makes tinnitus miracle download Securing Cyberspace, but Challenges Remain," it paints a disturbing picture of a national security disaster waiting to happen. The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team, or CERT, established in... TOKYO -- Japan's major automakers are trying to find alternative parts suppliers to replace those knocked out of action by the colossal earthquake last week that has forced most of the country's car production to a halt. Chaos reigns in business class in Pedro Almodóvar's slight yet droll commentary on post-crash SpainPedro Almodóvar, who turns 64 in September, is Spain's most important film-maker since Luis Buñuel and one of the first directors to enter mainstream cinema as openly gay. He made the last great movie of the 20th century, All About My Mother, and the first great movie of the 21st century, Talk to Her. He began his career making courageous, outrageous low-budget comedies, pushing the envelope of taste and acceptability in the immediate aftermath of Franco's dictatorship. Now with I'm So Excited! he characteristically combines subtlety and frivolity in a Wildean manner to comment upon Spain's current moral and economic crisis.His recent films have been seriocomedies, their plots complicated and referential. In All About My Mother, for instance, he brought together A Streetcar Named Desire and All About Eve. I'm So Excited! returns to a looser form, less complex than Feydeau's classic farce, nearer to the Hollywood screwball comedy. It is a branch of the aerial drama that began perhaps when Icarus's wings melted in the sun over the eastern Mediterranean and underlies a century of films about flying and aviators that stretches from the first world war to the present. It's one aspect of the disaster movie that comes to the fore when reflecting various social crises. The cinematic cycle, particularly associated with the Airport series of the early 1970s, was almost irreparably punctured by Airplane! (1980), the satirical anthology of the genre's cliches that introduced two decades of crude comic pastiches made by bright film school graduates.I'm So Excited! is more of an Almodóvar film than a pastiche of anyone else's and begins with a brief prologue on the ground beside the emblematically named Peninsula Airways' airbus. The movie's only major stars, Penélope Cruz and Antonio Banderas, make cameo appearances as a pregnant wife and her uxorious husband, working respectively as a baggage truck driver and chocks inspector. They're involved in a minor accident beside the shiny, pristine plane before cheerfully leaving another ground staff member to clear up.This innocent negligence leaves the undercarriage seriously damaged and Peninsula flight 2549 from Madrid to Mexico City is on the route to disaster. Fifty years ago last month, in my first Observer film column, I reviewed a Hollywood movie about the adventures of three airline hostesses called Come Fly With Me, taking its name from the Sinatra number sung over the opening credits. I'm So Excited! might well be called "Come Die With Me".Shortly after take-off, the discovery of the undercarriage problem is covered up and the passengers in the packed economy class are drugged into a deep sleep. The theatrical red curtain between them and the business class passengers is kept drawn. There are only seven people in business class – a famous dominatrix (the Argentinian Cecilia Roth), a rich lothario, a honeymoon couple, a clairvoyant (Lola Dueñas), a mysterious Mexican and the inevitable decamping financier. They soon get to know of the plane's problems because the chief steward is incapable of telling a lie, having been traumatised some years before by helping conceal the accidental killing of a deranged passenger.Most of the movie is set in the claustrophobic business class and the even more confined cockpit, as the three gay stewards, all as camp as bottled coffee, try to keep the passengers happy. The pilot and vitiligo treatment in contact with air control, but instead of being on their way to Mexico, the plane is constantly circling Toledo (and that's not Toledo, Ohio, as one passenger thinks), because none of the other Spanish airports can make an emergency runway available. And instead of the traditional macho pilots as played by Charlton Heston and Dean Martin, one of them is bisexual but happily married and the lover of the chief steward, while the other is an unhappy heterosexual who once fellated the chief pilot to see whether the experience was enjoyable.The film's original Spanish title is Los amantes pasajeros, which means "The Fleeting Lovers" or "The Passenger Lovers". The English title comes from the Pointer Sisters' 1982 number to which the stewards mime in an extravagantly choreographed fashion. They dance around the business class cabin supposedly calming its occupiers. They also serve a cocktail called Valencian Water, a lethal mixture of champagne, gin, vodka and orange juice laced with mescaline, that was apparently a fashionable drink in Spain's swinging 1980s. This gets the passengers and crew into a revealingly confessional mode and then in the mood for joining the mile-high club.There is also an important catalyst in the psychic passenger who has had premonitions about this flight involving both the presence of death and losing her virginity at 40,000 feet. This character is presumably based on the eerie true story about the RAF officer who foresees disastrous events in a postwar flight between Hong Kong and Japan that inspired Ealing Studios' 1955 supernatural thriller The Night My Number Came Up.I'm So Excited! is a slight, likable movie, beautifully designed and charmingly performed. It's full of amusing and clever touches, such as the portable ecumenical altar one of the stewards sets up and the way the clouds in the film are indistinguishable from the safety foam used to coat an emergency landing strip. Raising chuckles rather than hearty laughter, it invites our affection and collusion. The satire is mild rather than abrasive and as a metaphor for present-day Spain, which Almodóvar intends it to be, it's hardly more than a faint finger wagging.Watching it, I was reminded of a celebrated Peter Arno cartoon where America becomes an aerial catastrophe. It appeared in the New Yorker in 1930, shortly after the Wall Street crash, and depicts an aeroplane, its terrified pilot unable to avoid the mountain ahead of him. Behind him in the passenger compartment, oblivious of their fate, are five drunken socialites, one of them waving a bottle and shouting: "My God, we're out of gin!"Pedro AlmodóvarComedyPhilip Frenchguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds U.S. stocks rose last week, completing the biggest monthly advance in nine years as first-quarter earnings beat analysts' estimates at two-thirds of the companies in the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index that released results. Inside the Sheepshead Bay restaurant that was badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy last October.     The publicist for Puerto Rican reggaeton stars Wisin & Yandel said Sunday that the Grammy-winning duo has no intention of breaking up, dismissing comments made by another performer that the pair were going their separate ways.     Secretary of State John Kerry and Russia’s foreign minister, Sergey V. Lavrov, will meet next week to discuss Syria, after officials from the two countries failed to make headway in Geneva.     MBM report: Juan Mata's late goal moved Chelsea into third place while Rafael was sent off for a tepid Manchester United side Jacob Steinberg     UNITED NATIONS -- Haitian President René Préval will unveil a $3.9 billion plan Wednesday to begin radically reshaping his country's post-earthquake economy and infrastructure, according to a Haitian reconstruction action

  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 6:40 AM

    So, that's it. If you'd like to drop us a line, we would really appreciate it. Feel free to e-mail us at thewirelesswatch@gmail.com, and one of us will respond to you as soon as possible. Steven Spielberg says he plans to develop Stanley Kubrick’s unproduced screenplay about the life of Napoleon as a television miniseries.After two weeks of playing down the prospect of military intervention in Libya, the Obama administration is on the brink of inserting itself into a third war in a Muslim nation. Jeff Nichols, the director of “Mud,” narrates a scene from his film.     Washington has called for the release of Kenneth Bae, who was sentenced to 15 years for committing what North Korea called “hostile acts.” Tim Tebow was "excited" about coming to the New York Jets. So much so, he used the word 44 times in his introductory news conference in March 2012.     The benchmark Dow Jones industrial average reached an all-time high Tuesday, underscoring the contrast between corporate America’s rapid recovery since the financial crisis and the rest of the country’s ongoing struggle to regain its footing. Read full article >> Katy Perry and John Mayer have called it quits for the second time sources tell Us Weekly The pop st[...] Spring breaks that range from budget-oriented to beyond, when siblings are roommates, how to beat some Facebook scammers and other consumer-focused news from The New York Times. The president spoke briefly on Thursday after remaining largely out of sight as Wall Street has become engulfed by a financial crisis. On a trip to Tunisia and Egypt, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton was dogged by questions about looming crises in Libya and other countries where democratic aspirations have been met with brute force. One reason this process interests materials scientists is that most biochemical materials, such as shells or bones, form extremely slowly. But clotting takes place rapidly — so these insights could lead to solid structural materials that can form quickly.The flow-induced clumping, the team writes in its report, is “a completely new aggregation paradigm.” Alexander-Katz says that this process “seems to be a transition [from one chemical state to another] that hasn’t been studied before,” as well as a universal behavior that depends primarily on the shapes of polymers and particles.What’s more, the process is reversible: When the flow rate slows down, the plugs disaggregate anew. By selecting different polymer building blocks, it’s possible to “tune” the material to clump up at any specific flow-rate, he says.“I think we can start making all kinds of different aggregates that depend on flow conditions,” Alexander-Katz says. There may be a number of possible applications for inks, pigments and coatings, he suggests, or for devices such as self-healing tires. “There are so many processes where you have flows,” he says.Evan Sadler, a professor of medicine and of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Washington University in St. Louis, says, “I find it fascinating that a relatively simple model may account for the behavior of aquaponics 4 you download von Willebrand factor in flowing blood.” He adds that all animals have this factor, and all have platelets, but the sizes of platelets and the rates of blood flow vary greatly. This work, he says, “may help us to understand how the binding characteristics of vWF and platelets have been tuned by evolution to maintain normal hemostatic function across such a large range of conditions.”In addition to MIT, the team included researchers from Boston University; the University of Augsburg and Heidelberg Ruprecht-Karls University, in Germany; and Baxter Innovations, of Vienna. It was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the German Research Foundation. A majority of active-duty and reserve service members surveyed by the Defense Department would not object to serving and living alongside openly gay troops, according to multiple people familiar with the findings. Four years ago Jimmy Page inducted his former Yardbirds bandmate Jeff Beck into the Rock and Roll Ha[...] Suntech Power, which rose to become the world’s largest producer of solar panels, has suffered from quick expansion in manufacturing capacity followed by a drop in prices. Programing at Lincoln Center’s international summer festival aims for surprises rather than world premieres.     This week, Andrew Delbanco discusses “Is College Worth It?” and “College (Un)bound.”     Members of the Jukun ethnic group were marching through the town of Wukari, on their way to a funeral, when an argument broke out with local Hausa and Fulani youths.     England was stunned in Ashes action on Thursday as an Australia debutant, Ashton Agar, made the highest score by a No. 11 batsman in a record last-wicket stand.     Mike Green’s power-play goal eight minutes into overtime gave the Capitals a victory over the Rangers. The teams meet for Game 3 on Monday at Madison Square Garden.     Statements by Ecuador’s foreign minister and embassy in Washington suggested that a decision on the asylum request by Edward J. Snowden could take weeks.     The birth of Louise Brown in 1978 was the start of a revolution in fertility treatment – and there's more to comeThere's an old bell jar that sits on top of a cupboard at a Cambridgeshire fertility clinic where history was made; it was in a dish inside this jar that the world's first IVF baby spent the hours after her conception. With the success of in vitro fertilisation (IVF), scientist Robert Edwards and his gynaecologist colleague Patrick Steptoe had changed the future for infertile couples around the world.Louise Brown, that first IVF baby, is 35 this month and what was then a revolutionary scientific advance has become a routine medical treatment. More than five million IVF babies have been born, and it's easy to forget quite how controversial the idea of fertilising human eggs in a laboratory was at the time of Louise's birth. "It was viewed with absolute suspicion," says Professor Peter Braude, head of the Department of Women's Heath at King's College London. "If you talk to people today about human reproductive cloning, the feeling you trademiner pdf it is playing God is just how it was in 1978 with IVF."Steptoe and Edwards started to work together in the 1960s. Scientists had been experimenting with fertilising animal eggs outside the body, but few believed it would ever be possible to create human embryos this way. Steptoe and Edwards thought that they could help couples with fertility problems if they could take eggs directly from the ovaries and return them to the womb once they had been fertilised. Many, even within the scientific community, felt that their research using human eggs and sperm was unethical and immoral. They were refused a grant by the Medical Research Council, but set up base in Oldham, where they had no shortage of infertile women volunteering for the experimental treatment.Grace MacDonald, whose son Alastair was the world's second IVF baby, had read an article in the Lancet about the research Steptoe and Edwards were doing, and her overwhelming desire for a child led her to volunteer. "It was all very new so when we started in Oldham we were sworn to secrecy – I think for our own protection," she explains. "There had been so much controversy. I never looked on going there as being anything to do with courage though, it was just determination."MacDonald discovered she was pregnant after her second attempt at IVF, and gave birth to Alastair, the first IVF boy to be born, in January 1979. Across the world, other scientists were attempting to replicate the British achievement, and Australia's first success came in 1980. A year later, the first IVF baby in the US was born, but the total number of children across the world conceived using the process still only stood at 15.Steptoe and Edwards had originally hoped to carry on their work within the NHS, but it was clear that there was no appetite for this so they eventually set up their own private clinic at Bourn, just outside Cambridge. Treatment was expensive with each cycle of IVF costing £3,000, at a time when the average annual income was around £6,000. Fertility treatment was restricted to those who could pay, and were willing to undergo this radical new technique.The media fascination with IVF was intense, and the literature given to patients included advice about publicity; women were warned not to talk to the media, to "beware of telephone enquiries" and to avoid mentioning the names of any other women they'd met at the clinic. Many people, even within the medical profession, knew little about the treatment, as Ro Facer, who went on to have three children using IVF, discovered. She had been trying to conceive for some years when she heard Steptoe interviewed on the radio. "I'd never heard of IVF, I'd never heard of Louise Brown, and when I went to my doctor, she had never heard of IVF either so I had to do the research myself," she explains. "Eventually I got a referral. We saw Patrick Steptoe and I felt in very forex growth bot caring hands. It didn't ever feel as if you were being taken advantage of or experimented on."With success rates in the early years averaging 12%, most women who went to Steptoe and Edwards did not end up with a baby, but that didn't deter couples from around the world joining the waiting list. Lucy Daniel Raby had eight cycles of treatment in the 1980s before she finally got pregnant with her daughter Izzy. "It was all new and a bit sci-fi," she says. "We were the early pioneers, and part of this exciting experimental process. I didn't have a second thought about it once I knew it was the only way I could get pregnant. We were lucky that it was available."Gynaecologist Dr Thomas Mathews moved down from Scotland to learn about IVF from Steptoe and Edwards and he says patients were often very secretive about the fact that they were trying IVF, not telling their friends or families what they were doing. "The term test-tube baby had a stigma attached to it and it wasn't seen as natural," he explains. "I was passionate about it, but many people didn't understand."The embryos created during IVF are stored in small dishes rather than test tubes, but the term "test-tube baby" has stuck and, as Mathews suggests, does have negative connotations. There were wild rumours about what went on inside the clinic and the hostility and suspicion took a while to die down, as Vivien Collins discovered when she went to work for Steptoe and Edwards as a receptionist in the 1980s. "It was all very new and there were people who were critical. I had somebody who was disgusted that I worked at what she called a test centre where they made babies."IVF was far more demanding for patients than it is today. Women were required to spend two to three weeks as inpatients, staying in Portakabins in the grounds of their clinic. They had to collect all their urine during treatment as this was the only way doctors could monitor their hormone levels. If they weren't at the clinic, this meant carrying large plastic containers around with them at all times, and inpatients had to give samples every three hours, even during the night, as Daniel Raby recalls. "We were in beds in ranks, six of us in each of the Portakabins. They'd come round and wake us up in the middle of the night and we'd all troop off and we had to wee in a bottle so they could monitor our hormones. It did help us all to bond with one another."When these checks showed the hormone surge that indicated ovulation, the eggs had to be collected exactly 26 hours later. This meant that the medical team would often have to get up in the middle of the night to carry out operations to harvest women's eggs. It was felt that gravity might increase the chances of embryos implanting, so women were required to crouch forward with their tinnitus miracle download the air for an hour or two after embryos had been transferred. Despite all this, former patient Ro Facer says that it was a very supportive environment, which made the emotional strain of infertility and treatment more bearable. "The collaborative, team atmosphere helped with the stress and pressure," she explains. "We felt that we were all in it together, the staff and the patients."Today, IVF is a far more streamlined process. Women are treated as day patients, and there are no three-hourly urine collections, no hours of crouching after egg collection. Although moral and ethical questions still surround new advances, for the most part it has become an everyday treatment. Freezing allows spare embryos to be stored for future use and the advent of intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), where sperm are injected directly into the egg, has meant that male fertility problems can be treated too. Donor eggs, sperm and embryos can all be used to help couples with more complex fertility problems, and the multiple birth rate, which has been the biggest health risk from IVF, is coming down.The advances continue. This week it was reported that the first IVF baby to be screened using a procedure that can read every letter of the human genome had been born in the US. The birth of Connor Levy in Philadephia in May suggests next-generation sequencing (NGS), which was developed to read whole genomes quickly and cheaply, is poised to transform the selection of embryos in IVF clinics.In another significant development, it was reported this week that the cost of IVF could be cut dramatically from thousands of pounds to around £170 in what could mark the start of a "new era" in IVF. Fertility doctors from Belgium told a London conference that 12 children had already been born through the technique, which replaces expensive medical equipment with "kitchen cupboard" ingredients, like bicarbonate of soda and citric acid, with a success rate similar to conventional IVF.In the 35 years since Louise Brown's birth, IVF has become a global money-making business producing very healthy profits, and there are hundreds of centres offering treatment around the world. Labour peer Lord Winston, who was head of the IVF unit at Hammersmith, has been highly critical of the charges patients face in many clinics. "The biggest change has been the increasingly commercial market which has driven IVF," he says. "I think that the inequalities in treatment are scandalous, and I do feel very angry that the NHS has used IVF as a moneyspinner."Susan Seenan is deputy chief executive of Infertility Network UK, a charity that supports patients and campaigns for changes to the postcode lottery for NHS treatment. "Infertility is a devastating medical condition, and the emotional impact is exacerbated when people cannot access treatment," she says. "Thirty-five years after IVF started in the UK, we have a situation where your chances of having NHS-funded fertility treatment depend entirely on where you live, leaving many people unable to get the help that vitiligo treatment that, the most recent figures show an annual IVF birth rate of more than 17,000 babies in the UK, and average success rates have risen to around 25%. Professor Braude worries that women may put too much faith in fertility treatment, believing that it can override the biological clock. "There is a huge expectation, and people think that if they stave off motherhood for whatever reason then IVF will be their salvation, but that's not true. If one is realistic, it isn't that successful."So where will we be in another 35 years? Yacoub Khalaf, director of the IVF unit at Guy's and St Thomas's, suggests that ongoing stem cell research is the area to watch. "IVF has evolved significantly, but I think it is almost near the limits of biology now unless we find a way of creating eggs," he explains. "We do see patients who are struggling at 40 to 45, and the only thing which would change the face of treatment would be if we could make gametes from stem cells; if we could make sperm from men's skin cells, or eggs from women's hair cells."If that all sounds rather "brave new world", it is worth remembering that's just what many people thought about IVF itself 35 years ago. Whatever the future holds, it is clear that Steptoe and Edwards, who are now both dead, have left an extraordinary legacy. Mike Macnamee worked with them in the early days and is now chief executive at Bourn Hall. "They inspired incredible loyalty, but what came through most from both of them was that they understood the pain of infertility," he explains. "We forget that until Louise was born there was no hope for many couples."Louise Brown may have grown up in the media spotlight, but is keen to stress that today she leads an ordinary life. She is married and has a son, Cameron, who was conceived naturally. She says she tries not to think too much about being the first IVF baby, which is to her "just a normal thing because I have never known anything else". However, she is clearly proud of what Steptoe and Edwards achieved. "They helped thousands of people, people they hadn't even ever met, to have babies," she says. "Without them, these children wouldn't have been born."Louise's own birth was the landmark that changed the face of reproductive medicine, but it was the tenacity of Steptoe and Edwards, and the courage of their early patients, that so many parents today have to thank for their families.Fertility problemsChildrenMedical researchKate Brianguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     The Defense Department said Monday that it plans to improve oversight of contractors in Afghanistan and Iraq by hiring more contracting specialists and providing additional training to government employees who supervise work performed by outside firms. THE QUESTION Fatigue is a frequent complaint of people getting chemotherapy for cancer. Might exercise change

  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 6:37 AM

    The measure puts an end to most cases of so-called libel tourism, in which powerful foreigners have brought cases against authors, journalists and others.     Andrew Ebbett and Jannik Hansen both had a goal and two assists as the Vancouver Canucks beat the Nashville Predators 7-4 on Thursday night.A building opening this week in Hamburg, Germany, uses algae on the exterior to provide heat and cooling and muffle noise.     A team led by MIT neuroscientists has developed a way to monitor how brain cells coordinate with each other to control specific behaviors, such as initiating movement or detecting an odor.The researchers’ new imaging technique, based on the detection of calcium ions in neurons, could help them map the brain circuits that perform such functions. It could also provide new insights into the origins of autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other psychiatric diseases, says Guoping Feng, senior author of a paper appearing in the Oct. 18 issue of the journal Neuron. “To understand psychiatric disorders we need to study animal models, and to find out what’s happening in the brain when the animal is behaving abnormally,” says Feng, the James W. and Patricia Poitras Professor of Neuroscience and a member of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT. “This is a very powerful tool that will really help us understand animal models of these diseases and study how the brain functions normally and in a diseased state.”Lead author of the Neuron paper is McGovern Institute postdoc Qian Chen. Performing any kind of brain function requires many neurons in different parts of the brain to communicate with each other. They achieve this communication by sending electrical signals, triggering an influx of calcium ions into active cells. Using dyes that bind to calcium, researchers have imaged neural activity in neurons. However, the brain contains thousands of cell types, each with distinct functions, and the dye is taken up nonselectively by all cells, making it impossible to pinpoint calcium in specific cell types with this approach. For many people, the food-induced stupor that often follows a big meal is a good excuse for a nap. But for some, a brief walk shortly after eating is a quick way to burn some calories and aid digestion.     The proprietor of Chateau Montelena, Jim Barrett shocked the wine world by winning the 1976 Judgment of Paris competition. Ikea Hunter aquaponics 4 you download quite what to expect at her job interview Saturday, but she was relatively certain it wouldn't involve dancing with one of her prospective employer's managers. In this lesson plan, we provide five ways you can pair the intrigue of espionage with Times reporting to get students to think critically, ask questions, and see a different side of history and current events. Click to listen to Eve's 'Eve (feat Miss Kitty)' If you were still wondering "Who's that girl?" Eve[...] The State Department wanted to know whether Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner was on medication. American diplomats in Brazil, meanwhile, heard that Bolivia's indigenous president, Evo Morales, had a tumor. For four years, the Virginia General Assembly has scrimped, scrounged and borrowed to pay for schools, highways, police, and public programs that care for the mentally ill, the disabled and the poor. A recent survey finds that although cost is No. 1 in importance among the respondents, it is followed by trust and customer service. British Horseracing Authority chief executive determined to fully investigate worst doping scandal of modern timesMahmood al-Zarooni was condemned as a cheat and a liar by the British Horseracing Authority on Thursday, just a few minutes after he had received the news that he has been banned from horse racing for eight years.Zarooni's defence at a disciplinary panel hearing into a total of 15 cases of doping his horses with anabolic steroids was that he had been unaware that the practice was banned. When asked if they believed him, however, Paul Bittar, the chief executive of the BHA, and Simon Crisford, the racing manager for the Godolphin bloodstock operation which employed him, simply replied: "No."Zarooni also lied to a vet's assistant employed by Godolphin, according to Crisford, who said that the employee had injected substances into the horses because he had been ordered to do so by the trainer, without being told what was in the syringe. Two more Godolphin employees have also been named by Zarooni as parties to the doping, according to Crisford.Zarooni was the prime mover in the conspiracy, however, according to the BHA and Godolphin, and was described by Crisford as "a reckless person who has shown no respect for racing"."It's going to be a lengthy process [to restore faith in Godolphin]," Crisford added, "but all of our winners have been trademiner pdf they have all been tested clean. This is an isolated incident."Events have unfolded at dizzying speed since the BHA announced on Monday evening that 11 of Zarooni's horses had tested positive for one of two banned steroids, ethylestrenol and stanozolol. Zarooni is now a pariah in the sport that gave him a good living until less than a week ago, despite having trained two Classic winners and a winner of the Dubai World Cup in his three seasons with Godolphin.There was a distinct sense of a line being drawn under the affair on Thursday, as Crisford, who recommended Zarooni as a potential employee in March 2010, and three of the most senior executives at the BHA sat side by side. Bittar, though, insisted that the Authority's investigation of the case is not over and that inquiries will continue."All of the evidence suggests that what the trainer has told us is true and correct," Bittar said. "We are clear that there are further steps for us to take in terms of Godolphin's procedures, processes and controls, but as far as charges and liability go, that liability is with the licence holder."I'm certainly not saying it's the end of it – I would term it the end of the beginning in a way. It deals with the issues at hand and the 11 positive tests we had and where the liability sits, and it sits with the trainer. It's not fair to say end of it, far from it."One issue that the Zarooni case has laid bare is the significant differences between the doping rules in major racing jurisdictions, and that Britain's zero-tolerance approach is far from being the global standard.In Australia, for instance, steroids are routinely used to improve a horse's strength and general health, and are illegal only if they are still present in the system when it starts a race. Since the withdrawal time for ethylestrenol, for instance, is a few days at most, that means that horses can be administered with steroids until close to a race, and Zarooni's offence, which has seen him banned until 2021, would not even have merited a disciplinary inquiry in Australia.In Dubai, meanwhile, steroids can also be given to horses before they go into training but Crisford said that it was not felt necessary to stress to Zarooni that the use of forex growth bot was not acceptable in Godolphin's British operation."I didn't tell him not to do it," Crisford said, "because I didn't think for one minute that he would be doing it. It's his duty as a licensed trainer to take care of the horses under his care. You don't have to be a racehorse trainer in this country to know that anabolic steroids are completely outlawed; you don't need a trainers' licence to know that."Crisford added that the unnamed vet's assistant who injected the steroids into Zarooni's horses was also one of the victims in the case, as he was forced to follow the trainer's orders even though he was unaware of what was being administered. The steroids, meanwhile, and in considerable quantity, had been imported from Dubai, which is of itself illegal.Godolphin will now continue the process of testing every horse at Zarooni's former yard, and will extend the testing to the yard in the centre of Newmarket where Saeed bin Suroor trains the other half of its string should the BHA request it. For the world's biggest bloodstock operation, the process of recovering from the worst scandal in its 20-year existence starts now, but the shadow of Mahmood al-Zarooni will be a difficult one to escape.GodolphinDrugs in sportBritish Horseracing AuthorityPaul BittarSheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al MaktoumHorse racingGreg Woodguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Smart Investing The lawns surrounding the Taj Mahal in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, undergo beautification.     Plant infringement.     European champions Chelsea were left contemplating a long trip to Russia's Rubin Kazan in their second leg following the Europa League quarter-final draw on Friday. U.S. consumers should be able to reclaim control of their personal data from data brokers, websites and other companies, a member of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said Wednesday.     A visit to the Congress on Tuesday by Cuba's best-known dissident may have slightly narrowed one of Washington's long-standing political gaps - the angry dispute over the U.S. embargo against the Communist government in Havana. A Russian Soyuz capsule landed in the steppes of Kazakhstan, bringing home an American and two Russian astronauts from the International Space Station. In an effort to bring a more human dimension to the online-education experience, Department of tinnitus miracle download and Computer Science Associate Professor Rob Miller has developed a new computer system that will help provide students with feedback on their homework assignments and create more interaction between students, teachers and alumni.Called Caesar, the system was developed by Miller, a principal investigator at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), and two of his graduate students, Mason Tang and Elena Tatarchenko, to address the challenge of how to facilitate instructor feedback to the hundreds of students taking his introductory computer science course each semester. Many of the students taking the course, “Elements of Software Construction” (MIT course 6.005), are new to the subject matter, and Miller thought they would benefit from more hands-on guidance. In particular, he wanted to find a way to critique the thousands of lines of code that his students write as part of each of their homework assignments.Miller’s own research focuses on human-computer interaction and crowd computing — the process of distributing complex tasks to a group of people over the Internet, allowing them to tackle smaller, more specific portions of the overall task. Miller used this approach in developing Caesar, devising a system that allocates small chunks of code written by his students to a diverse group of computer science students, teaching assistants and 6.005 alumni, who then review the work. Several reviewers are assigned to look at each student’s work, so every student receives feedback from a variety of sources.“What we are trying to do is to learn how to use a crowd of people with mixed expertise in an intelligent way; one that helps students and ‘the crowd’ expand their knowledge and improve on their expertise,” Miller says.The Caesar system has three components: the code selector, the task router and the reviewing interface. Once students have turned in an assignment, the code selector divides their work into chunks and prioritizes the chunks that need review, based on features of the code that suggest it will need attention. The task router then assigns these chunks to a diverse group of reviewers.By distributing the evaluation process across a large pool of reviewers, Miller hopes to provide students with useful feedback that will improve their work. At the same time, he hopes that this type of crowd-sourced code reviewing can serve as a new learning platform for students at MIT and elsewhere.The reviewing vitiligo treatment takes no more than three days, a much shorter timeframe than traditional methods for giving feedback on student assignments. The quick speed with which the evaluation is completed allows students to receive feedback before they tackle their next assignment.The code-reviewing process also teaches students a skill that could serve them well down the road, as software companies need developers who can track down bugs and other glitches in code.Like Facebook and other social networks, Caesar provides opportunities for other kinds of interaction among its users. Reviewers can agree or disagree with fellow reviewers’ comments via an “upvote” or “downvote,” a process similar to the “like” feature on Facebook, and can also leave comments for both students and other reviewers.Miller hopes that by linking students, alumni and TAs with different backgrounds and programming experience, he can increase learning opportunities for all parties. “Every time you interact with a new person, it’s an opportunity to learn, whether it’s a student demonstrating a new technique to a TA, or an alum providing a student with a valuable piece of industry advice,” Miller says.Looking to the future, Miller believes that crowd-sourcing tools such as Caesar will become increasingly important to the success of online education. “Such systems are able to draw on a diverse and multitalented pool of individuals, and could potentially make the online classroom a more vibrant, interactive place,” Miller says.Caesar is already being adopted in other MIT programming courses, and plans are in the works to use it in edX, the online-learning initiative founded by Harvard University and MIT. Miller believes that the system could also be adapted beyond academia to industry and other fields.“Ultimately, I believe that crowdsourcing is going to develop hand-in-hand with automatic mechanisms for making online education work, because there are so many aspects of learning that require a human touch,” Miller says. Not every useful product has to be a big deal. From a replacement charging cable to suction cups that help prop your gadgets, the little stuff can still be important.     Gilbert King, who won a Pulitzer Prize for “Devil in the Grove,” his account about a forgotten chapter of racial injustice, traveled a winding road on his way to the award.     An accident that left the actor Tristan Sturrock with a broken neck is at the center of the play “Mayday Mayday” at St. Ann’s

  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 4:50 AM

    If you're disappointed that the sequester has the White House canceling tours, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has your back. In a letter to constituents, he says that the Capitol building is still happy to host — and suggests that the White House could have planned better. Read full article >> In most flood affected areas entire village economies were dependent on tourism.    About two years ago, while many Americans were watching President Obama's inauguration and my former colleagues in the Bush administration were cleaning out their offices, I was flying home from The Hague, where the International Court of Justice had just ruled against the United States in a case I... The bride is a resident in pediatrics at Mass General; the groom teaches high school history and English.     U.S. stocks rose last week, snapping four weeks of declines, on speculation that the deteriorating economy will force Congress to reach a compromise on President Obama's economic stimulus package. It's time to answer your garden questions again -- in winter, when time is spent out of the garden, planning what can be done to enhance it in spring. Oh when the saints go marching inOh when the saints go marching inSome play the song like that. But Dylan Sherry plays it like this: Oh when the saintsOh when the saints Go marching inGo marching inHear the difference?“I like a Dixie-New Orleans style, because it’s exciting and a lot of interesting, unexpected things can occur,” says this 21-year-old tenor saxophonist. When Dylan was a baby, his father, a jazz bass player, lulled him to sleep every night with the sounds of Count Basie, Duke Ellington and Dizzy Gillespie. “By the time I was nine, the sounds stopped sounding like a random jumble and began to really cohere,” says Sherry, who for years attended his father’s gigs and continued to listen every night to the music of the jazz greats. Now a grad student in electrical engineering and computer science, Sherry, who graduated in 2012, is a four-year member of the MIT Jazz Ensemble, and six times won MIT music awards for outstanding achievement. Trained forex growth bot classical style, Sherry has performed with the MIT Symphony Orchestra, MIT Wind Ensemble, and during MIT’s 150th celebration, he performed an improvised solo before a crowd of 9,000. He also is a guest artist on Echoes of the Prophet, a commercial CD he made with Sam Sherry, his dad. “I love jazz. It’s spontaneous, always different, can’t be easily defined, and there are endless possibilities,” says Sherry, who at MIT was an Emerson Scholar, a scholarship for private instruction for top students who each year perform before a live audience. If you’ve ever heard of the Beatles –– and if you like to feel good  ––  listen to a song from his recent performance.Work in harmony “I want to work in artificial intelligence but I’ll never give up music. I’m planning my career and my music career to work in harmony,” says Sherry, who currently feels jazzed about working with a group to develop a cloud-backed, massive-scale platform for evolutionary computation. “There are similarities between music and artificial intelligence,” he says. “Music has a deep relationship with the human mind and that could inform the field. In artificial intelligence, there’s a branch of research directed at how people represent ideas and concepts in their minds. For musicians, many of the structures they create are sufficiently complex to require great intellect; being able to grasp and understand such structures is a skill of the human mind and is probably the same one that allows computer scientists to manipulate software objects mentally or allows engineers to shuffle parts of designs around in their heads. I think there’s a great parallel there.” MIT’s music program was a “gigantic factor” in Sherry’s decision to come to MIT and not to go to a music school, he says. “Conservatory programs are transforming musically, but MIT is transforming personally, professionally and also musically.  No other science and engineering school is like it. Real music is happening here.” Thousands of homeowner associations and condominiums across the country just sidestepped a potentially costly problem. Earlier this month, a federal agency backed off a controversial plan to make obtaining aquaponics 4 you download their communities much more difficult and to dry up a key source of revenue th... Former Alaska governor Sarah Palin urged Republicans at a rally in California on Saturday to work 20-hour days over the next two weeks to take back the state - and the country - for the "little guy." And why did the Little Mermaid get hitched at age 15?     Washington State is the latest college to enter the meat market, offering premium beef, alongside its longtime staple, Cougar Gold, cheese in a can. When fists started to fly, the students flipped on their camera phones. Alumnus Roger Lewis has had — and continues to have — a pretty remarkable career, as full of unexpected turns as a novelistic page-turner. The story began in Houston in the 1950s — a place he knew, by the time he was in his mid-teens, that he would eventually leave — and moved to Massachusetts when MIT offered him a full scholarship directly out of high school. He headed for Cambridge with plans to become an engineer, a mathematician or a scientist but by the middle of his sophomore year he was ready to drop out, convinced that he didn’t want to be any of those things but not at all sure what he did want to do.In an attempt to help him find his direction, the dean of students asked him the obvious question — What do you like to do best? — and the answer just fell out of him: ‘Draw’. So the dean suggested he consider looking into architecture. "I didn’t even know how to spell it," he says now. "But I ambled over to Building 7 and had a look around at all the drawings and models and I thought — you mean you can get credit for this?" So he signed on and began his bachelor's in architecture in his junior year.Read the full story By definition, memoirists get to tell their stories the way they remember them. The retellings can be gentle or scorching, illuminating or concealing. KABUL - An Afghan government probe of vitiligo treatment companies has accused 16 firms of violations that include employing too many guards, failing to pay taxes for up to two years, and keeping unregistered weapons and armored vehicles. Simon Shalloe, the kit designer for Olorun Sports, picks the best and worst strips that have been worn by the national team• England's Umbro football kits – in picturesThree best England shirts1963–70 awayThe red round-neck jersey worn in the 1966 World Cup final was produced in knitted pima cotton for comfort and did not carry the Umbro logo. This has to be the most iconic England jersey of all time. At this time 85% of British clubs were wearing Umbro kits, a testament to the strength and popularity of the brand.2001-03 homeThe vertical red stripe on the jersey and shorts suggested the St George's flag. The piped raglan and shaped back panel were the starting point of the modern ergonomic football shirt as we know it. This was the first time since 1960 that the name of England's opponent and the date appeared on the jersey. It was also the first time players' names appeared on the back of the shirt outside the final stages of a tournament.2012 homeThe white and red jersey is styled after the colours of the St George's flag. The England crest and Umbro logo are presented in vermillion red and the details feature a single-button woven collar with a red inner-detailed stripe rib design inspired by Sir Alf Ramsey's iconic 1966 jacket. My personal favourite and fitting that Umbro should produce its finest jersey for England before its curtain call.Three worst England shirts1992 goalkeeper's jerseyWorn by Chris Woods, Tim Flowers, Nigel Martyn and David Seaman, this jersey was extrovert to say the least. When sublimation dye printing was first introduced the design ethic was to get as much content as possible on to a football jersey. The result of this in the 1990s was a horrendous mixture of colour, pinstripes, zigzags and crests.1992 third topThree lions were printed into this light blue jersey and made it cluttered and ugly. The knitted polo-type collar with a striped trademiner did not add anything to the design. This kit was worn for two games without a win and looking back at this era we can really appreciate the way that fit and form has moved on.1996 awayAn odd grey-blue colour and Umbro changed its double diamond for a clumsy, bold text logo. The 50s-style cutaway revere collar is neat and almost similar to the current shirt. The England crest is worn centre front and larger than normal, but this does not look like an England jersey.Simon Shalloe is a kit designer for Olorun SportsEnglandguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The Accordions Around the World festival this summer offers accordionists a chance to shed a stodgy image.     • Manx leader faces challenge from André Greipel• Chris Froome in contention for general classificationMark Cavendish was the early leader of the Tirreno-Adriatico coast-to-coast race as Omega Pharma-Quick Step won the opening stage in Italy.The Belgium-based team navigated rainy conditions to finish the 16.9km team time trial with a time of 19min and 24sec, with Cavendish taking the blue jersey for crossing the finish line first.With a time of 19min 35sec, Movistar were 11 seconds behind the sprinting team of Cavendish, Tony Martin, Michal Kwiatkowski, Zdenek Stybar and Niki Terpstra.Cadel Evans, Thor Hushovd and Taylor Phinney were in the BMC Racing team that placed third with a time of 19min 40sec on a course running from San Vincenzo to Donoratico.After reaching the Tuscan coast, Cavendish said: "Two words, one name – Tony Martin. He did the majority [of the work] today. [It was] the planning they put into it but without putting too much pressure on it … We finished with five but everybody had a part to play."There are no real egos here, except maybe me, but it was all about getting eight guys from point A to point B as quickly as possible."The Manx sprinter will defend his lead against André Greipel of Lotto Belisol and the 2012 tinnitus miracle download France green-jersey winner Peter Sagan over Thursday's 232km trek to Indicatore.Team Sky, meanwhile, were 25 seconds behind the winners but a seventh-placed finish leaves their team leader, Chris Froome, in contention for the general classification.Froome earned an early advantage over two of his biggest rivals as Team Sky gained four seconds on Alberto Contador's Saxo-Tinkoff and 19 seconds on Joaquim Rodriguez's Katusha.Meanwhile, the American cyclist Andrew Talansky held off six riders in a sprint finish to win the third stage of the Paris-Nice race and take the race leader's yellow jersey.The small breakaway group attacked late and the Garmin-Sharp rider finished a bike's length ahead of Davide Malacarne of France, with Gorka Izagirre of Spain in third. All three had the same time of 4hr 6min 15 seconds over the undulating 170.5km course from Châtel-Guyon to Brioude.The three moderate climbs proved too much for the Italian sprinter Elia Viviani as the overnight race leader dropped to 59th place in the standings, nearly three minutes behind Talansky, who leads Andriy Grivko of Ukraine by three seconds.Mark CavendishCyclingguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds In response to Israeli settlers’ complaints, Palestinians who live under Israeli military occupation in the West Bank and commute to work in Israel are being encouraged to use buses that keep the groups apart. Kids with diabetes need to regulate their diets, monitor their blood-sugar levels and take the appropriate amount of insulin. Jeffrey Gettleman reports from Kibera, a part of Nairobi that was a flashpoint of violence during Kenya’s last presidential election. This time, things are tense but there has been no violence so far. Mortgage interest rates were little changed from last week, keeping borrowing costs steady as demand for home loans increases. After Cal Coach Mike Montgomery shoved a star player to make him play better, some sports columnists pushed back and the coach voiced his regrets. A Massachusetts judge sealed the records of the district court overseeing the murder investigation involving Patriots tight end Aaron

  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 4:49 AM

    Do you think people under the age of 18 are mature enough to make life-or-death decisions on their own? Which of these things do you think constitute life-or-death decisions? Why?     At the National Concrete Canoe Competition, engineering students raced aboard vessels they designed to float using a material that is normally the stuff of parking garages.    Solo travelers, long resigned to paying more because they’re traveling alone, are starting to find some relief. That figure puts it among the most costly natural disasters in modern history, and officials say it could take five years to rebuild a devastated Japan. On a rainy night in March, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates traveled to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to witness the military's ritual for welcoming home its war dead. In Renata Adler’s reissued novels, vignette follows vignette. A Pakistani police report says an American Embassy official jailed in the killing of two Pakistani men is "guilty" of murder, citing investigators' findings that the official shot each victim five times, including in their backs, and lied to police about how he arrived at the scene of the incident. Only if you have the core competencies will you be able to action the key deliverables ... Steven Poole drills down into the strangled vocabulary of office jargonAmong the most spirit-sapping indignities of office life is the relentless battering of workers' ears by the strangled vocabulary of management-speak. It might even seem to some innocent souls as though all you need to do to acquire a high-level job is to learn its stultifying jargon. Bureaucratese is a maddeningly viral kind of Unspeak engineered to deflect blame, complicate simple ideas, obscure problems, and perpetuate power relations. Here are some of its most dismaying manifestations.1 Going forwardTop of many people's hate list is this now-venerable way of saying "from now on" or "in future". It has the rhetorical virtue of wiping clean the slate of the past (perhaps because "mistakes were made"), and implying a kind of thrustingly strategic progress, even though none is likely to be made as long as the working day is made up of funereal meetings where people say things like "going forward".2 Drill downFar be it from me to suggest that managers prefer metaphors that evoke huge pieces of phallic machinery, but why else say "drill down" when you just mean "look at in detail"?3 ActionSome people despise verbings (where a noun begins to be used as a verb) on principle, though who knows what they say instead of "texting". In his Dictionary of Weasel Words, the doyen of management-jargon mockery Don Watson defines "to action" simply as "do". This is not quite right, but "action" can probably always be replaced with a more specific verb, such as "reply" or "fulfil", even if they sound less excitingly action-y. The less said of the mouth-full-of-pebbles construction "actionables", the better.4 End of playThe curious strain of kiddy-talk in bureaucratese perhaps stems from a hope that infantilised workers are more docile. A manager who tells you to do something "by end of play" – in other words, today – is trying to hypnotise you into thinking you are having fun. This is not a game of cricket.5 DeliverWhat you do when you've actioned something. "Delivering" (eg "results") borrows the dynamic, space-traversing connotations of a postal service — perhaps a post-apocalyptic one such as that started by Kevin Costner in The Postman. Inevitably, as with "actionables", we also have "deliverables" ("key deliverables," Don Watson notes thoughtfully, "are the most important ones"), though by this point more sensitive subordinates might be wishing instead for deliverance.6 IssuesCalling something a "problem" is bound to scare the horses and focus responsibility on the bosses, so let's deploy the counselling-speak of "issues". The critic (and managing editor of the TLS) Robert Potts translates "there are some issues around X" as "there is a problem so big that we are scared to even talk about it directly". Though it sounds therapeutically nonjudgmental, "issues" can also be a subtly vicious way to imply personal deficiency. If you have "issues" with a certain proposal, maybe you just need to go away and work on your issues.7 LeverageAnother verbing, as in the parodic-sounding but deathly real example reported by Robert Potts: "We need to leverage our synergies." Means nothing more than "use" or "exploit", forex growth bot be attractive because of the imported glamour from high finance, though that may now be somewhat tarnished. Give me a place to stand and I will move the world, said Archimedes. He didn't say he would leverage the deliverables matrix.8 StakeholdersPeople in the company who are affected by a certain project; also, sometimes, business partners and customers. This term, plump with cheaply bought respect, seems to have infected corporate-speak from New Labour politics, where "stakeholders" were not wooden-spike-wielding vampire hunters but people with an interest (usually financial) in some issue. Business analyst Emma Sheldrick offers some useful translations. "Manage our stakeholders," she explains, means "placate the people who are asking the intelligent questions about why something is being done"; while "Update our stakeholder matrix" really signifies "we need to take off the people who disagree with the task at hand and find some new ones who agree."9 CompetenciesOnly if you have the core competencies will you be able to action the key deliverables for your relevant stakeholders going forward. Perhaps "competencies" has displaced "abilities" because of a perceived slight to people with disabilities, and "skills" because that just sounds too elitist. Whatever the reason, its usage graph on Google's Ngram Viewer shoots up from 1990, alarmingly like the graph of global temperature. There is no evading the stylistic devastation it represents.10 SunsetAn imagistic verbing – "We're going to sunset that project" – that sounds more humane and poetic than "cancel" or "kill". When faced with the choice between calling a spade a spade and cloying euphemism, you know which the bosses will choose.LanguageCareersSteven Pooleguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     An unknown number of people remained trapped after a structure that housed garment factories crashed down near Dhaka.     Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel’s “Leviathan,” set on a groundfish trawler out of New Bedford, Mass., emphasizes the brutality of fishing. On their daily cable car rides to and from home in Venezuela's capital, Maria Gonzalez and Jose Rafael Suarez soar in a bubble of safety far above the deadly, trash-strewn streets below. As large numbers of Protestants plan to march this weekend, the Northern Ireland police chief has taken the unusual step of calling in hundreds of reinforcements from Scotland, Wales and England.     From 3-D to hip-hop, Baz Luhrmann pursues his vision.     The California nonprofit organization that operates the Internet's levers has always been a target for such global heavies as Russia and China that prefer the United Nations to be in charge of the Web. But these days, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers is fending off attacks ... Bipartisan letter asks Government Accountability Office to look into costs of ITER Our panel of science and innovation policy experts digest the details of George Osborne's spending reviewVince Cable's determination to hold his ground against George Osborne fuelled a lot of speculation about science and innovation spending ahead of today's spending review. Would the Medical Research Council's budget be shifted to the Department of Health? Would there be any fresh capital investment in science? Would the UK's embryonic innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board, get a further boost as part of a more active industrial policy? Now the verdict is in. In his speech on Wednesday, Osborne emphasised three principles – reform, growth and fairness – and talked up the role of science and innovation in driving growth. The science budget – that is, funding for research allocated mainly through the research councils and block grants to universities for research – was "ring-fenced" at £4.6bn per annum in the previous 2010 spending review, to the relief of the research community, which had been braced for significant cuts. However, the capital spend on science was cut drastically – cuts that have been partially but not entirely reversed since then. On Wednesday the chancellor confirmed that the ring-fenced science budget would be maintained, and capital spending on science boosted. Of course, a frozen science budget is, in reality, a declining one. And just the prospect of greater competition for funding pushes actors in the science base to make short-term decisions that can have long-term impacts. And at the end of the day, this is a aquaponics 4 you download round. With a general election expected in May 2015, attention will now shift to the prominence given to research and innovation in the manifestos and spending plans of the three main parties. Long before then, we will know the outcomes of the ongoing Triennial Reviews of the Research Councils and the Technology Strategy Board. Could major structural changes be on the cards? We'll have to wait and see. In the meantime, we have invited a range of commentators on science and innovation policy to offer their first reactions to today's spending round statement and look ahead to what it might mean.Sir Paul NurseBack in 2010 the science community breathed a huge sigh of relief when the spectre of cuts in the spending review largely passed us by. It wasn't great news, as a flat cash settlement meant real terms cuts, but in comparison with many other sectors it was good news. There was also the blow of significant cuts to the capital budget.In the past few years the government has spoken in increasingly positive terms about science and innovation as the key to long-term, sustainable economic growth. It has also taken pretty much every opportunity to put right the damage done to the capital budget. The mood music at Westminster has also been positive with the parties competing with each other to show their science credentials – a welcome show of cross-party agreement. So today's announcement of a flat cash settlement for the operational science budget with a further long-term boost to the capital budget is hopefully less a cause of relief and more a cause for confidence for the future. We still have quite a long way to go as both government and business investment in research falls below the level of our competitor economies, but there is reason to believe that we are on the right road.We must give credit where credit is due. The chancellor, Vince Cable and David Willetts have protected science. The next step must be to nurture our already world-leading capacity with greater investment – and there are signs of that in the capital budget changes announced today. That is how we will make research the engine room for economic growth. Sir Paul Nurse is the president of the Royal Society and a Nobel laureateMariana MazzucatoThere are key problems with the spending review and the logic behind it. Firstly, the continued insistence that more cuts are necessary – £11.5bn over the next spending period – is just wrong. There is no need for more cuts in a country that is not facing serious pressure from the financial markets on its deficit (especially one with a central bank that can intervene at any time, making the probability of default almost nil), has its own currency, and is in fact facing increasing pressure, from non-obvious sources like the IMF, for its lack of growth. And since growth is the denominator of debt/GDP, even though the government is trying to cut its debt, the ratio rises due to the low denominator. And what is causing the low growth of the denominator? Most macro and micro economists will agree that spending in key areas like education, human capital formation, skills, research and development (public and private), as well as health care, are key to future growth in the long run. It is simply not true that these areas are being ring-fenced. The Campaign for Science and Engineering has revealed the "real" fall in the science budget to be about 12% (with initial cuts being now filled back in but not enough to control for inflation) at a time when our key competitors are increasing it by at least that same amount. And anyone like myself who has kids in state schools knows full well how cuts in locally funded after-school programmes and libraries affect the most vulnerable in society – making it harder, not easier, for people to find work and stay in work. All this is continued bad news for the denominator of debt/GDP, making the numerator almost meaningless. Mariana Mazzucato is R M Phillips Professor of Science and Technology Policy at the University of Sussex, and author of The Entrepreneurial State (@mazzucatom)Luke GeorghiouThe settlement is close to the upper limits of expectations of research-intensive universities and we should gracefully acknowledge the vitiligo treatment by Cable and Willetts and accepted by the Treasury. The upfront linkage of support for science with growth is central to that case. It means that the "impact agenda" will be with us for the foreseeable future. Maintaining resource funding in cash terms continues the real-terms decline but the restoration of capital funding is genuinely good news. The drastic initial reduction followed by intermittent short-term announcements of availability of new funds did perversely have some benefits, including stimulation of arrangements for sharing equipment and the ability to make swift and bold decisions. Both look set to survive, with the Research Partnership Investment Fund continuing to leverage private funding, but the real hope here is that the low-to-mid-range infrastructure on which the majority of research depends can be put back into balance and that a planned approach can replace hasty responses. Universities will also welcome the positive treatment of ecosystem partners, notably the Technology Strategy Board. It is positive to see that postgraduate funding is on the radar and linked to students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Other parts of the Review await interpretation. Reprioritisation of teaching grant spend could be a reference to cuts for Widening Participation. Reduced spending on administration is also significant. Research funders will have less ability to process grant applications and will be driven still further towards devolving that workload to universities, both by demand management and by giving fewer, larger and longer grants. Luke Georghiou is Vice-President for Research and Innovation at the University of Manchester and Professor of Science and Technology Policy and Management at the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research (@lukegeorghiou)Sarah MainThe Chancellor has claimed that he is 'up for the challenge of making the UK the best place in the world to do science'. Today's announcements alone will not achieve that goal. We now urge government to set an upward trajectory for long-term investment in UK science and engineering for the next Spending Review. In the long term, 'flat cash' will not be sufficient. We applaud the Chancellor's ambition for science and engineering, and are heartened by the efforts made to protect science in the face of deep departmental cuts across the board. But the commitments made today pale in comparison to those made by leaders of our partner nations who are investing heavily in science and research for economic growth. The risk of sliding down the global 'premier league' of scientific nations is not simply one of pride, but of real economic cost in losing the 'spillover' benefits of competing with the big guns. The Chancellor's announcement of additional capital is welcome. However, anyone who has been frustrated by working in a lab where new equipment falls into disuse due to lack of maintenance or upgrades will know the pitfalls of capital investment without investment in staff and running costs. With a flat-cash science budget, research organisations will find it increasingly hard to find the money to maintain their new equipment. To make the most efficient use of additional capital, the government must ensure that it is supported by parallel investment streams for recurrent costs. And government investment in UK science and research is far broader and greater than the ring-fenced science budget. Today a number of research-intensive departments saw deep cuts to their departmental budgets. We wait to see how departmental spend on R&D is affected by the settlements for areas like transport, defence, environment and energy. Sarah Main is Director of the Campaign for Science and Engineering (@sciencecampaign)Rebecca WillisToday's Spending Review is unfortunate timing for any government wanting to be seen to be green. It comes just a day after Obama's impassioned plea to America to "convince those in power to reduce our carbon pollution. Push your own communities to adopt smarter practices. Invest. Divest." And the stock market reaction – renewables up, coal down – said it all. It's a long time since we've seen any leading UK government figures being so unequivocal about the need for action. Not surprising, then, that the government's own advisers, the Committee on Climate Change, are saying – in a report launched today – that the UK is in danger of missing its statutory carbon targets within the next few years. Equivocation and watered-down policy has damaged confidence in low-carbon investment.There are some crumbs of comfort in trademiner today. At the risk of generalising, investment in the science base and in innovation – especially the applied innovation of the TSB and Catapault Centres – will be good news for new low-carbon technologies and systems. And we do now have a Green Investment Bank – even if it can't yet borrow.But set this against the woes of Defra and DECC – both Whitehall minnows ill-prepared for further budget cuts – and, crucially, the lack of any Tory consensus on the environment, and the picture doesn't look rosy. Conservatives are split about the merits of low-carbon investment – indeed, for truly unfathomable reasons, they are split about the science of climate change. Against this backdrop, there is unlikely to be a huge amount of investment in the good stuff – or divestment from the bad. Both the economy and the environment will suffer as a result.Rebecca Willis is an independent researcher, adviser to the Lake District National Park Authority and a council member of the Natural Environment Research Council (@bankfieldbecky)Stian WestlakeToday's Spending Round marks another step in the Government's gradual conversion to activist innovation policy. Back in 2010, innovation policy followed robustly Thatcherite lines. Science funding was protected (in cash terms at least) and tax breaks doled out to entrepreneurs. The implication was that the invisible hand would take care of the rest. The Technology Strategy Board, the public body that co-funds technology development by businesses, had to put up with a certain froideur from some at the centre of government. It wasn't seen as close enough to the cool kids of Shoreditch's Internet start-ups, at a time when Tech City was all the rage in Downing Street. And of course, it was a quango, a New Labour creation no less, at a time when that elicited suspicion. This was a mistake. Like it or not, if Government wants to help turn research into winning business ideas at scale, the TSB is the only game in town. To their credit, thanks in no small part to the judgment of David Willetts and Vince Cable, the Government has now realised this. As a result, the TSB is seeing a £185m budget increase (superficially this looks like a 19% boost to its 2014-15 settlement, although some portion of this may represent the continuation of programmes that would otherwise have been cancelled, like the Biomedical Catalyst), on top of another increase last year, and a sizeable increase to innovation procurement budgets (which the TSB helps run). It was interesting to see this money classified as "infrastructure" in the Spending Round report, perhaps a recognition of its importance to economic growth. All this is great news. But before we break out the champagne, it's worth remembering how our spending in this area stacks up internationally. TEKES, the TSB's equivalent in Finland, long considered a poster-child for innovation and technology, invests around €600 million each year, in an economy a tenth the size of ours. Today's announcement was welcome, but there's still a way to go. Stian Westlake is executive director of policy and research at NESTA, the UK's foundation for innovation (@stianwestlake) Philip MoriartyWith local government facing the deepest cuts since the Second World War, sweeping pay cuts for millions of public sector workers, and tweets like "Seems Wonga is gonna be the major beneficiary" circulating on the interwebs, I am intensely aware that it would appear to be rather churlish of scientists to complain about the outcome of the spending review on the science budget. But although we can indeed breathe a small sigh of relief – one need only look at the sharp downward adjustments of the budgets of other areas of government to realise how bad it could have been – it's certainly not all good news. The capital spend is one thing and, of course, welcome (although quite whether the boost in funding is as large as Osborne would have us believe is moot). The Chancellor's announcement of a continued flat cash settlement for science resource is immensely worrying – we've already suffered a substantial loss in the amount of science funding due to the freeze put in place in 2010. Despite Osborne's warm words about the cultural and economic value of scientific research, the spending review is certainly not going to enhance our ability tinnitus miracle download on the world stage. And, of course, the big question of just how the science budget will be divvied up between the research councils and the other funding bodies which fall under the BIS 'umbrella' is yet to be addressed and looms large. Even if the axe didn't fall on the so-called 'quality-related' component of the funding for higher education institutions, there remains scope for potentially seismic changes in just how the BIS budget is distributed amongst HEFCE and the research councils.Philip Moriarty is a Professor of Physics and an Engineering & Physical Sciences Research Council Fellow in the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of NottinghamDave O'BrienThe electioneering aspects of the spending review apart, there are three points that stand out: the public sector pay freeze, the talk of transferring research activities to fully ring-fenced departments such as Health and the role of arts and social science in growth. First, the public pay freeze: whilst most researchers fall outside the public sector pay envelope, both research funding agencies and research activities within government (and, in decreasing numbers, local government) need to attract talented staff who have the capabilities to commission and consume research. The danger is that rates of pay will become uncompetitive compared with research roles in the private sector, stripping skills from the infrastructure on which research in the UK depends. The rumoured shift of medical research and/or education spending to the Department of Health may have failed to materialise, but it will be interesting to see how both AHRC and ESRC priorities maybe effected by the need to find alternative basis for funding beyond BIS.And the commitment to the budget for the Technology Strategy Board, along with a less severe than expected cut to the Culture, Media and Sport budget, suggests the government is tentatively supporting the creative economy, although this is not one of BIS's industrial policy priority areas. It is clear that the UK needs a new economic settlement and investment in the creative economy will be an important part of that.Overall the spending review still leaves open the question of the future of arts and social science researchers. Whilst the spending review document commits to improving support for postgraduates from disadvantaged backgrounds by offering a modest fund to HEFCE, this is still woefully short of the comprehensive policy on postgraduate education funding which all three of the main political parties have failed to provide. Dave O'Brien is a lecturer in cultural and creative industries at City University London. He specialises in cultural value and urban cultural policy issues (@DrDaveOBrien) Science policyCSR 2013George OsborneBudget 2013BudgetKieron FlanaganJames Wilsdonguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     If you’re a high school junior, this is the part of your college search that does not have a lot of specific deadlines. It does, however, have a lot of things you need to do to stay on track and set yourself up for the best experience. Do the old rules of investing still apply? "Buy and hold" has proved a good method for cutting your wealth in half. Regularly rebalancing a portfolio has sent money straight to sectors, such as financial-company stocks, that plunged steeply. And, though it's said that no one can successfully time... Baz Luhrmann’s “Gatsby,” J. J. Abrams’s “Star Trek,” breakthrough performances, movie listings and more.     Meeting in Beijing, the presidents of the two countries agreed to work together to resume six-nation talks, stalled since 2008, aimed at ending the North’s nuclear programs.     Yani Tseng is not worried about losing her top ranking on the LPGA Tour, believing it may even turn her disappointing results around. Twenty-seven years ago, Fotini Kessissoglou, a Greek immigrant, had trouble finding yogurt like the kind she had back home. So she started making her own, opening Kesso Foods in 1986.     PARIS - Top diplomats from some of the world's biggest powers deferred Tuesday to the U.N. Security Council to take action against Libya, as France and Britain failed to win support for a no-fly zone to halt the advance of Moammar Gadhafi's forces. Screenvision, the nation’s second largest seller of commercials in movie theaters, plans to hold its first upfront sales presentation to

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    T-Mobile USA's "radical" service plans promising no annual contracts aren't quite as radical as consumers might think, and the mobile operator will change its advertising and offer refunds in a settlement with the state of Washington. As the National Hockey League's (NHL) lockout-shortened regular season nears its final month, the Los Angeles Kings are finding a familiar rhythm that resembles their stunning playoff run of last year.The Obama administration reiterated its support Monday for repealing the military's "don't ask, don't tell" law and policy as Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) worked to strip language repealing the ban from the annual defense authorization bill. Lermusiaux leads MIT’s Multidisciplinary Simulation, Estimation, and Assimilation Systems (MSEAS) group, which develops models and assimilation schemes to better predict ocean behavior for a wide range of applications — from planning the most efficient paths for underwater robots to anticipating how bioluminescent organisms will affect sonar propagation. The group focuses, in part, on modeling coastal areas, which Lermusiaux describes as a veritable sea of complexity.  “In coastal areas, things can get more mixed up than in the open ocean,” says Lermusiaux, an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. “You have fronts and eddies, currents and jets, and the effects of winds, the seabed and the Earth’s rotation. There is a lot of coastal ocean in the world, and it’s very dynamic.” Working hard for funThe concept of fluid dynamics was of early interest to Lermusiaux, who remembers learning of the Coriolis effect — the inertial force created by the Earth’s rotation — in a high school geography class. “The teacher started explaining with an apple, and I still vividly remember that part, and thought it was fascinating how these forces would appear,” he recalls. Lermusiaux grew up in Liège, Belgium, in a family of scientists. His father is a nuclear engineer, his mother a geography professor, and his sister an architect. The family often went along on his mother’s field trips, and took countless vacation detours to visit natural sites and manmade systems, including old ruins and architectural relics, following the family mantra: “It needs to be seen.” His father comes from a long line of farmers, dating back five generations — a lineage that may have rubbed off on Lermusiaux, who spent many of his weekends and holidays working at a local farm with a friend. “We’d get up very early in the morning, and they’d do a very good breakfast of eggs and bacon, and you were almost like a son of the family,” Lermusiaux says. “We’d show up, work very hard, and we’d stink by the end of the day. But it didn’t seem like work to us — it was fun.” When it came time to decide on a path after graduating with an undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from Liège University, Lermusiaux recalls broaching the subject of graduate studies abroad over the dinner table. Not long after, he headed across the Atlantic to Harvard University to pursue a PhD in engineering science. Going coastalFor his thesis, Lermusiaux worked to whittle down the uncertainty in ocean modeling. At the time, ocean data were relatively limited, and samples came with some uncertainty. As a result, approximate models initialized using that fuzzy data could lead to widely varying predictions. Lermusiaux looked for ways to characterize and predict uncertainty, and for ways to combine models forex growth bot data sets to reduce this uncertainty. He developed a data-assimilation method and computational schemes that produced better estimates of, and furthered understanding of, ocean dynamics. His work came at a pivotal time in ocean engineering. “It was the end of the Cold War, and people were looking less at the deep ocean, and moving toward the coast,” Lermusiaux says. “It was the beginning of trying to resolve the multiple scales and the motions in the ocean that matter, as realistically as possible.”During his time at Harvard, Lermusiaux’s work occasionally took him out to sea. On one sampling expedition, he spent three weeks aboard a NATO ship near the Faroe Islands, halfway between Norway and Iceland. The region sits along the Iceland-Faroe Ridge, where warm currents from the Atlantic meet frigid waters from the Nordic seas. The interplay between the two water masses creates extremely powerful fronts that can deflect sonar signals. (The region, in fact, is a setting for the novel “Red October,” in which a Russian submarine evades detection by hiding in the turbulent waters.) Onboard the ship, Lermusiaux analyzed data collected during the cruise and found large-scale wave modes. Today, he says, much of this computational engineering work can be done remotely, thanks to the Internet. Researchers can download data directly from cruise servers, and perform analyses on more powerful computers in the lab. Eliminating the impossibleLermusiaux set up his own lab at the end of 2006 when, after receiving his PhD from Harvard, he accepted a faculty position at MIT. Based in the ocean science and engineering section of MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, his group carries out research in mechanics, computations and control. Specifically, his group has developed and applied new methods for multiscale modeling, uncertainty quantification, Bayesian data assimilation and the guidance of autonomous vehicles. A specific focus has been to answer questions involving nonlinearities and multiple scales. For example, the team is modeling the dynamic marine environment in Stellwagen Bank, at the mouth of Massachusetts Bay — a rich ecological web of life forms from plankton to whales. Lermusiaux’s group uses mathematical computations to model the relationship between physical and biological processes, aiming to understand how eddies, waves and currents enhance the region’s nutrient delivery and retention. The group has also been looking further out to sea to study multiscale dynamics at continental shelf breaks — boundaries at which the shallow ocean floor suddenly drops off, plunging thousands of feet and giving way to much deeper waters. “You have fronts between the shelf water and deeper water, and that’s an important region for exchanges,” Lermusiaux explains. “However, the multiscale interactions at shelf breaks are not well understood.” Recently, his group has characterized the multiscale variability of internal tides in the Middle Atlantic Bight shelf break. They showed how this internal tide variability can be caused by strong wind and by direct Gulf Stream interactions.To allow such multiscale studies, Lermusiaux’s team has adapted new ideas in computational fluid dynamics. They are developing numerical models with variable resolutions in time and space, and have also created equations that predict uncertainty in large-scale ocean systems. They then developed nonlinear Bayesian data-assimilation methods that employ these uncertainty predictions. These methods can predict the likelihood of different scenarios and combine these scenarios with actual field observations in a rigorous Bayesian fashion.  The researchers are also applying their aquaponics 4 you download the dynamic control and planning of swarms of autonomous underwater vehicles, or AUVs. Increasingly, these robots are used to sample and monitor the ocean for pollution, marine populations, energy applications, and security and naval operations. With his students, Lermusiaux is developing mathematical models to determine the most efficient paths for robots to take, maintaining coordination among robots along the way. For instance, if a current is likely to flow in a certain direction, a robot may want to simply ride the wave toward its destination.  Lermusiaux’s group is also working on schemes that guide such sensing robots toward locations that provide the most useful undersea data. Similarly, the researchers have recently integrated their work into powerful new systems that can objectively rank competing ocean models, accounting for all uncertainties. The key to this kind of modeling, as with much of Lermusiaux’s work, is eliminating unlikely, or impossible, scenarios. For example, determining whether a vehicle should go left or right is a numerical process of elimination, depending on certain parameters like current speed and direction — an oversimplification, compared with the incredibly complex environment which he models. “We have made advances in numerical schemes, uncertainty prediction, data assimilation and inference, which all have applications in many engineering and scientific fields,” Lermusiaux says. “The smarter you are in combining information with model simulations, the better you can be.” The bride is a senior director of an executive search firm; the groom is a professor of computer science at Princeton.     Following our chat with Ian Sample on Monday, we're opening up the discussion once again for readers. Join us at 1pm ETUS doctors have effectively cured a child born with HIV. Dr Hannah Gay cared for the child at the University of Mississippi medical centre and told the Guardian's Ian Sample the case amounted to the first "functional cure" of an HIV-infected child."Now, after at least one year of taking no medicine, this child's blood remains free of virus, even on the most sensitive tests available," Gay said.According to the Center for Disease Control, in 2011 the estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States was 49,273, and there were were an estimated 192 diagnoses of HIV infection among children aged less than 13 years at diagnosis. Unicef data show that around 330,000 children around the world were newly infected with HIV in 2011. The global total of children under 15 living with HIV is 3.3 million, with more than 90% of these children living in sub-Saharan Africa.Following Ian's reader Q&A from Monday, we're opening up the discussion once again for readers. Joining us is Dr Sandra Burchett, Clinical Director and Director of Children's Hospital's AIDS Program at Boston Children's Hospital.The goal of Burchett's research is to prevent transmission of viruses from mothers to babies. She is a former chair of a committee in the Pediatric Aids Clinical Trials group that develops studies to understand the safety and usefulness of drugs used to treat HIV and to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV. She is also a former chair of a national protocol for the study of how best to treat children with advanced HIV infection, which focuses on the central nervous system reservoir. A few questions from yesterday to start us off:• What does this discovery mean for medicine? – asked by ronaldo4madrid• What are the lines of vitiligo treatment cures that are being pursued at present? – asked by Steven Wilson• Could this child ever have children of its own some day? – asked by capocannonJoin us here at 1pm ETYou can also join the chat on Twitter by using #openchat. Aids and HIVMedical researchKatie Rogersguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Playmaker Andres Iniesta has dismissed the idea Barcelona are at the end of an era following their 4-0 Champions League mauling by Bayern Munich.     Inertia was the last thing I expected during a recent Montana cross-country ski trip. The latest deaths bring the total number of Tibetans who have killed themselves by fire since February 2009 to 118, said Radio Free Asia. No doubt. They're high school students. The plaintiff of the Defense of Marriage Act case gives her theories on keeping love alive and pushing the envelope.     22-year-old missing since March was wrongly identified by online sleuths as a suspected Boston Marathon bomberA body pulled from waters off a Providence park was that of a 22-year-old Brown University student missing since last month, the Rhode Island medical examiner's office said Thursday.Sunil Tripathi was identified through a forensic dental exam, but a cause of death has not been determined, said Dara Chadwick, a spokeswoman for the state health department.The announcement put an end to the mystery of Tripathi's disappearance, which became doubly painful for his family when amateur online sleuths wrongly identified him as a possible suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.Tripathi's family, of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, said they were overcome with grief but grateful for the outpouring of support relatives got over the last month."As we carry indescribable grief, we also feel incredible gratitude," the Tripathi family said in a statement on a Facebook page set up to help find Tripathi, who went by Sunny. "To each one of you – from our hometown to many distant lands – we extend our thanks for the words of encouragement, for your thoughts, for your hands, for your prayers, and for the love you have so generously shared."Tripathi's body was found Tuesday by members of the Brown crew team off of India Point Park and was brought to shore by its coach, Providence police Cmdr Thomas Oates said. He said the body had been in the water for "some time".Tripathi's family had been searching for him since mid-March with help from the FBI and fellow Brown students. His sister, Sangeeta, said he left his phone, wallet and other belongings in his apartment near campus and simply disappeared. He was on leave from the Ivy League school, where he was studying philosophy, and had been going through a difficult time, she said.Last week, speculation swirled on Twitter and the website Reddit that Tripathi was the second of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings because some thought he resembled one of the people in photos released by the FBI. That person turned out to be 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, authorities said.Reddit later apologized to Tripathi's family for fueling "online witch hunts and dangerous speculation which spiraled into very negative consequences for innocent parties."Tripathi's family responded to the speculation in a Facebook post that read: "A tremendous and painful amount of attention has been cast on trademiner Sunil Tripathi in the past 12 hours. We have known unequivocally all along that neither individual suspected as responsible for the Boston Marathon bombings was Sunil."The family said in its statement Thursday that the last month "has changed our lives forever, and we hope it will change yours too".The family went on: "Take care of one another. Be gentle, be compassionate. Be open to letting someone in when it is you who is faltering. Lend your hand. We need it. The world needs it."Brown president Christina H Paxson sent a message to the campus community Thursday, saying Tripathi – the brother of two Brown graduates – would be remembered for his "gentle demeanor and generous spirit." She described him as an accomplished saxophonist and a "serious, thoughtful, intellectually curious student and a brilliant writer".Rhode IslandBoston Marathon bombingUnited StatesRedditguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     As Myanmar embarks on improving its higher education system, the possibility of assistance from foreign universities and scholars has become a central focus.     The acting commerce secretary, Rebecca Blank, will leave her post in July to become chancellor at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. The top job at commerce has been snakebit for President Obama, dating to the days before his first term. Obama’s first two choices for the position, former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson (D) and former New Hampshire governor Judd Gregg (R), both pulled out before the Senate could vote on them. Read full article >> Memphis forward Tarik Black is transferring to Kansas and will be eligible to play immediately.     U.S. stocks posted the biggest weekly retreat since November after companies cut profit forecasts and rising unemployment spurred concern the recession is deepening. An excerpt from the book “Roger Ailes: Off Camera” by Zev Chafets published on Vanity Fair’s Web site reveals little about the Fox News Channel, but includes a number of pointed one-liners uttered by Mr. Ailes, whose conservative politics appeal to many Fox viewers but infuriate his critics. Filed under: WiMax, Cellular, BusinessThe prevalence of 3G wireless handsets combined with the global positioning of WiMax technology is making Motorola and Texas Instruments gleefully happy -- as both companies are trying to seize on those markets ahead of rivals.Motorola has plenty of rivals in the 3G marketplace, although TI has a decent portion of the WiMax market with the clout it wields (alongside Nortel and Alcatel, among others).Read | Permalink | Emai l this | Linking Blogs | Com ments The bonds of the European Union are tested as wealthier nations come to the aid of smaller, struggling states. Recently I noticed more fieldset + legend weirdness, this time involving the border-radius and box-shadow CSS properties. If you use either property on a fieldset element that has a child legend element (which all fieldset elements should), you will get unexpected results in some browsers. Luckily I also found a fix after a bit of experimentation.Read full postPosted in CSS.Copyright © Roger Johansson The best bets and latest news in our daily horse racing blogWhile most horses with a comparable degree of talent have been at Cheltenham this week, Carruthers (3.50) has been having a quiet time of it in Letcombe Bassett, being prepared for Saturday's Midlands Grand National at Uttoxeter. It is the first tinnitus miracle download 2007 that he has not taken part in the Festival, where he led the Gold Cup field for a long way in Imperial Commander's year.Now 10, Carruthers is not quite up to such feats any more but he is an excellent handicap chaser, as he has shown by winning his last two races in that sphere, at Ffos Las on Boxing Day and again there last month. Part of the reason for his return to form may be the presence in the saddle of the talented amateur Nico de Boinville, who has ridden him only on those two occasions and gets the leg-up again for this race.Raised 5lb since his latest success, Carruthers must surely go well if in the same frame of mind. There are a couple of other potential front-runners in the field but he has not minded having company in front when successful recently.2.05 Uttoxeter: The use of a tongue tie appears to have turned things round for Rocky Elsom, the winner of his last two races. He has been raised 10lb for this but faces a mostly unpromising collection of rivals.2.20 Lingfield: On a run of five consecutive wins Tarooq seems to have benefited from gradually being stepped down in trip. Five furlongs is shorter again than anything he has tried but he has plenty of zip.2.40 Uttoxeter: Savant Bleu ran into a well-handicapped rival when second to Twirling Magnet at Newbury last time, the pair eight lengths clear of their dozen rivals. He can defy a 6lb rise for that and appears the most progressive in this small field.2.55 Lingfield: Marco Botti has started the year well, with 17 winners already at a 27% strike-rate, and Teophilip can sustain the good work. On a steep upward curve, he has also benefited from a tongue tie and is value for more than the 6lb by which he has been raised for his latest win.3.15 Uttoxeter: At a decent price Hold Court is worth consideration, especially if the going has not worsened significantly by the "off" time. A dual hurdles winner at Ludlow in the autumn, he could not live with The New One at Warwick in January and was held up off a steady pace on his handicap debut last time. This race may pan out better for him and he is not harshly treated.3.30 Lingfield: Roger Varian is just starting his season but can be relied upon to have Farraaj ready for the Winter Derby. He clocked a good time when landing a Listed race over this course and distance in November, his first run for seven months, during which time he was gelded. He had been third in the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Turf the previous year.Horse racing tipsHorse racingChris Cookguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Even with obesity rising, and despite its toll on medical costs, access to bucket-size sodas was widely seen as a personal choice. MANAMA, Bahrain - A Saudi-led military force crossed into Bahrain on Monday to prop up the monarchy against widening demonstrations, launching the first cross-border military operation to quell unrest since the Arab world's rebellions began in December. Jeremy Hefner showed that he can punch out hitters if he gets riled up

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    Sergei Bobrovksy shook off a slap shot to his mask and withstood two late goals, and Mark Letestu had a goal and an assist as the Columbus Blue Jackets beat the struggling Nashville Predators 4-3 on Tuesday night to extend their franchise-record point streak to 11 games. More details on how the Supreme Court decision that invalidated the Defense of Marriage Act will affect same-sex couples when it comes to income taxes, Medicaid and Medicare.    Elite universities are joining in, but the massive online open courses, known as MOOCs, threaten to poach paying students from other institutions. As a child, Paul Lazarescu dreamed of becoming an inventor. “I always loved building things,” he says. “For my birthday presents, I’d get remote-control cars and kits, and I once tried to make myself a hovering magnetic car — it didn’t work,” he chuckles.Lazarescu was born in South Africa, where his father had emigrated, by way of Israel, after fleeing Romania’s Communist regime in the 1960s. When he was four years old, his family moved to southern California, where Lazarescu and his two siblings grew up. Now a mechanical engineering major in his senior year at MIT, Lazarescu is on the way to achieving his childhood dream: He’s designed a hand exerciser for stroke rehabilitation, a wheelchair attachment for off-road travel, and a structure for mounting NASA sensors on airplanes. Draft bill would establish new agency to oversee highly radioactive material Lawmakers have passed a landmark shark conservation bill, closing loopholes that had allowed the lucrative shark fin trade to continue thriving off the West Coast. The composer of “Wicked” and “Pippin” is writing the score for “Schikaneder,” which will have its premiere in Vienna.     Facing the challenge of going eight to 12 weeks without their most physical defender in center Andrew Bynum, the Lakers are again trying to discover if Pau Gasol and Lamar Odom can form a fearsome front line. Is she a poet? No one quite knows for sure. It's addictive and toxic, like a drug, and we need to wean ourselves off it, says US doctorSugar – given to children by adults, lacing our breakfast cereals and a major part of our fizzy drinks – is the real villain in the obesity epidemic, and not fat as people used to think, according to a leading US doctor who is taking on governments and the food industry.Dr Robert Lustig, who was this month in London and Oxford for a series of talks about his research, likens sugar to controlled drugs. Cocaine and heroin are deadly because they are addictive and toxic – and so is sugar, he says. "We need to wean ourselves off. We need to de-sweeten our lives. We need to make sugar a treat, not a diet staple," he said."The food industry has made it into a diet staple because they know when they do you buy more. This is their hook. If some unscrupulous cereal manufacturer went out and laced your breakfast cereal with morphine to get you to buy more, what would you think of that? They do it with sugar instead."Lustig's book, Fat Chance: The Bitter Truth About Sugar has made waves in America and has now been published in the UK by 4th Estate. As a paediatrician who specialises in treating overweight children in San Francisco, he has spent 16 years studying the effects of sugar on the central nervous system, metabolism and disease. His conclusion is that the rivers of Coca-Cola and Pepsi consumed by young people today have as much to do with obesity as the mountains of burgers.That does not mean burgers are OK. "The play I'm making is not sugar per se, the play I'm making is insulin," he says. Foodstuffs that raise insulin levels in the body too high are the problem. He blames insulin for 75% to 80% of all obesity. Insulin is the hormone, he says, which causes energy to be stored in fat cells. Sugar energy is the most egregious of those, but there are three other categories: trans fats (which are on the way out), alcohol (which children do not drink) and dietary amino acids.These amino acids are found in corn-fed American beef. "In grass-fed beef, like in Argentina, there are no problems," he said. "And that's why the Argentinians are doing fine. The Argentinians have a meat-based diet … I love their meat. It is red, it's not marbled, it's a little tougher to cut but it's very tasty. forex growth bot grass-fed. That's what cows are supposed to eat – grass."We [in the US] feed them corn and the reason is twofold – one, we don't have enough land and, two, when you feed them corn they fatten up. It usually takes 18 months to get a cow from birth to slaughter. Today it takes six weeks and you get all that marbling in the meat. That's muscle insulin resistance. That animal has the same disease we do, it's just that we slaughter them before they get sick."But his bigger message is that cheap sugar is endangering lives. It has been added to your diet, "kids have access" to it, and it is there in all sorts of foods that don't need it, he says. When high-fat foods were blamed for making us overweight, manufacturers tumbled over each other to produce low-fat products. But to make them palatable, they added sugar, causing much greater problems.Cutting calories is not the answer because "a calorie is not a calorie". The effect of a calorie in sugar is different from the effect of a calorie in lean grass-fed beef. And added sugar is often disguised in food labelling under carbohydrates and myriad different names, from glucose to diastatic malt and dextrose. Fructose – contained in many different types of sugar – is the biggest problem, and high-fructose corn syrup, used extensively by food manufacturers in the US, is the main source of it.Lustig says he has been under attack from the food industry, but claims they have not managed to fault the science. "The food industry wants to misinterpret because they want to discredit me. They want to paint me as this zealot. They want to paint me as somebody who doesn't have the science. But we do," he says.Evidence of dietary effects on the body is very hard to collect. People habitually lie in food diaries or forget what they ate. Randomised controlled trials are impossible because everyone reverts to a more normal eating pattern after a couple of months. But his sugar argument is more than hypothesis, he says, citing a recent study in the open journal Plos One, of which he was one of the authors. It found that in countries where people had greater access to sugar, there were higher levels of diabetes. Rates of diabetes went up by about 1.1% for every 150 kcal of sugar available for each person each day – about the amount in a can of Coke. Critics argued sugar availability was not the same as sugar consumed, but Lustig and his colleagues say it is the closest approximation they could get.That study was aimed at the World Health Organisation although he believes it is a conflicted organisation.But so is the US government, he says. "Government has tied its wagon to the food industry because, at least in America, 6% of our exports are food. That includes the legislative and executive branches. So the White House is in bed with the food industry and Congress apologises for the food industry."Michelle Obama appeared to be onside when she launched her Let's Move initiative in February 2010 with a speech to the Grocery Manufacturers Association of America. "She took it straight to them and said, 'You're the problem. You're the solution.' She hasn't said it since. Now it's all about exercise."Far be it from me to bad-mouth somebody who wants to do the right thing. But I'm telling you right now she's been muzzled. No question of it." In his book he tells of a private conversation with the White House chef, who he claims told him the administration agreed with him but did not want a fight with the food industry.Some areas of the food industry have appeared to be willing to change. PepsiCo's chief executive officer, Indra Nooyi, who is from India which has a serious diabetes epidemic, has been trying to steer the company towards healthier products. But it has lost money and she is said to be having problems with the board. "So here's a woman who is trying to do the right thing and can't," he says.Court action may be the way to go, he says, suggesting challenging the safety of fructose added to food, and food labelling that fails to tell you what has been added and what has been taken out. Fruit juice is not so healthy, he says, because all the fibre that allows the natural sugars to be processed without being aquaponics 4 you download fat has been removed. Eat the fruit, he says, don't drink the juice. Lustig is taking a master's at the University of California Hastings college of law, in order to be a better expert witness and strategist.It is not a case of eradicating sugar from the diet, just getting it down to levels that are not toxic, he says. The American Heart Association in 2009 published a statement, of which Lustig was a co-author, saying Americans consumed 22 teaspoons of it a day. That needs to come down to six for women and nine for men."That's a reduction by two thirds to three quarters. Is that zero? No. But that's a big reduction. That gets us below our toxic threshold. Our livers have a capacity to metabolise some fructose, they just can't metabolise the glut that we've been exposed to by the food industry. And so the goal is to get sugar out of foods that don't need it, like salad dressing, like bread, like barbecue sauce." There is a simple way to do it. "Eat real food."Does he keep off the sweet stuff himself? "As much as I can. I don't go out of my way. It finds me but I don't find it. Caffeine on the other hand …"Lustig's food advice • Oranges. Eat the fruit, don't drink the juice. Fruit juice in cartons has had all the fibre squeezed out of it, making its sugars more dangerous.• Beef. Beef from grass-fed cattle as in Argentina is fine, but not from corn-fed cattle as in the US.• Coca-Cola, Pepsi and other sweetened beverages. These deliver sugar but with no nutritional added value. Water and milk are the best drinks, especially for children.• Bread. Watch out for added sugar in foods where you would not expect it.• Alcohol. Just like sugar, it pushes up the body's insulin levels, which tells the liver to store energy in fat cells. Alcohol is a recognised cause of fatty liver disease.• Home-baked cookies and cakes. If you must eat them, bake them yourself with one third less sugar than the recipe says. Lustig says they even taste better that way.ObesityDiabetesFood safetyHealth & wellbeingFood & drinkFood scienceFood & drink industryHealthSarah Boseleyguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds "It's 99.9 percent air," says artist Tomás Saraceno of his latest work, "On Space Time Foam." On Space Time Foam is a multi-layered habitat of diaphanous membranes suspended 24 meters above the ground, its form continuously shaping and shaped by the actions of those who dare be enfolded within the billows and wrinkles of its inflated topography. What steel was to the cities of the 20th century, perhaps air will be to those of the new millennium. Water, air and gas — the most mercurial of substances — are the materials of the artist, whose visit is sponsored by the Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) and the Department of Architecture. With these materials, he constructs feedback loops activated by the presence of visitors within them. Like a biosphere, where water cycles around through the processes of evaporation and condensation, "On Space Time Foam" is an ecosystem. It makes tangible the complex systems of interaction, both physical and social, between humans and their environment. Trained as an architect and inspired by the utopian ambitions of such visionaries as Buckminster Fuller, Saraceno creates installations that express an aerial vision of a more interconnected existence. "It's like Airship Earth," Saraceno says, alluding to Fuller's Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth. The dream of his ongoing series, "Cloud City," is not only to live among the clouds but also to create cities more like clouds — changeable, mobile and responsive to atmospheric shifts, on both the natural and cultural scale. Saraceno's works "refuse to be subordinated to tectonics," remarked Nader Tehrani, professor and head of the Department of Architecture, who moderated Saraceno's public lecture on Nov. 15, "Moving Beyond Materiality," along with fellow Professor of Architecture Antón García-Abril. The forms of Saraceno's pneumatic structures often mimic the latticework of molecules, the crystalline designs of spider webs, soap bubbles and neural circuits. In these forms, constituting the most basic patterns of existence, Saraceno searches for a universal language, the cosmic shape that unites life on earth. He searches for the forms — from the tiniest spider web to the structure of vitiligo treatment — that configure life on earth. Most of his works are variations on a theme: transparent envelopes of air suspended high above the ground. These envelopes may contain plant life, water, air or bodies; they are blueprints for incubating a world in the sky. Feats of engineering, the installations possess a delicate yet nimble strength — and they are getting more elaborate. With the help of scientists and engineers — including those at MIT — Saraceno is moving closer toward realizing this vision. If earlier iterations were more symbolic statements — poetic suggestions for all that could be — his more recent projects edge nearer to this airy utopia. In 2010, Saraceno collaborated with arachnologists to model in 3-D the intricacies of a Black Widow spider web, a form thought to mirror the structure of the universe. This kind of complex digital visualization had never before been achieved, and led to a plethora of new insights, both scientific and artistic. A collaboration between different disciplines and institutions, the work resulted in a hand-knotted model 30 times the web's original size. While attending NASA's International Space University, Saraceno subsequently proposed to send the spiders up to the near weightlessness of NASA's space labs in order to study, with a team of scientists, the effects of microgravity on their webs. At MIT, Saraceno had the opportunity to draw upon a vast array of expertise in departments across the Institute: aeronautics and astronautics; biology; physics; chemistry; electrical engineering and computer science; mechanical engineering; civil and environmental engineering; earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences; architecture; science, technology, and society; and media arts and sciences. Swinging between the practical and the speculative, Saraceno discussed everything from nanoengineered materials to solar energy to weather patterns to the origins of the universe. He asked scholars in diverse disciplines to imagine with him what a different reality might look like. To defy gravity, after all, is part of Saraceno's ultimate goal in conceptualizing a more sustainable future. In his vision, inflatable pods would take off in flight, rising skyward to colonize the cloudscape. Propelled by currents of wind, these self-sustaining modules would always be drifting and reshaping into endlessly malleable new formations, loosened from the constraints of geopolitical borders. "It's a public space made up of very small spheres," he says, imagining a community defined by greater freedom and mobility, both physical and intellectual. What the cloud city offers is a new paradigm for thinking about humanity's relationship to the natural world and to one another. While conventional logic invests human beings with all the power to change the environment, Saraceno's installations model the dynamic interplay between human and non-human agents in a complex network of organisms, materials, and natural forces. They reflect an increasingly interconnected world — environmentally, politically and socially — in which the smallest of fluctuations (say, a dip in the market) has far-reaching global consequences. This butterfly effect is physically manifested in "On Space Time Foam," which is currently on display at Milan's HangarBicocca and will later form the basis of a floating biosphere in the Maldives Islands made habitable with solar panels and desalinated water. As visitors slide through these pressurized sacs of air, each layer with its own climate, their movement produces a reaction throughout the entire installation. When visitors cluster too close to one another, the force of their combined weight can lead to what Saraceno calls a "black hole of social interaction," referencing the cosmological theories of that informed the piece. In his work, everything is connected. "I am trying to make people engage and tune with each other," Saraceno notes. To be sure, the artist is more of a composer than an urban planner. He calibrates densities — whether that of a bead of moisture in the air or the weight of a passing footstep — and, in doing so, reminds audiences of the world's overwhelming sensitivity and intricacy. In a March 2009 meeting between John Brennan, President Obama's principal counterterrorism adviser, and King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, Brennan carried a letter from the president expressing concern about the 99 Yemenis remaining at the military prison at Guantanamo Bay. The White House had hoped ... When she and her husband, Stuart, finally found out they were having a baby, she knew she couldn't breast-feed. So she began doing research on the Internet. In the last month, Oberlin College has been jolted by slurs, swastikas and a late-night sighting of someone in a robe trademiner The author of this week’s cover article answers questions about the power struggle at NBC’s morning show — and why it matters.     As the last U.S. combat troops prepare to leave Iraq this month, the State Department is struggling to implement an expanded mission that it has belatedly realized it might not be able to afford. Whatever might be said of Yahoo’s workplace, it’s a long way from Google’s, whose various offices reflect the company’s overarching philosophy to create a happy and productive environment. More details on how to make sourdough. The United States is conducting a diplomatic full-court press to try to block Edward J. Snowden from finding refuge in Latin America.     Citrix has added instant messaging to its Podio enterprise collaboration product so that employees can engage in one-to-one and group text chats while they work on tasks and projects. This summer, Citrix will extend Podio Chat with audio communications and video conferencing, expanding the real-time communications features of the product. [ Discover what's new in business applications with InfoWorld's Technology: Applications newsletter. ] Red Bull driver Mark Webber says he will leave Formula One at the end of the season after 12 years in the sport     Scented candles and other aromatics can round out an interior. A pair of designers sniff out their favorites.     This article first appeared in the Autumn 2012 issue of Energy Futures, the magazine of the MIT Energy Initiative. Subscribe today.Prizes have long been used to induce solutions to national challenges. Between the 16th and 19th centuries, prizes yielded the vaccine inoculation, the lifeboat, a method of calculating longitude at sea, new food-preservation techniques, and more. But by the late 19th century, prizes had largely been replaced by two other mechanisms: patents and grants. However, those tools have limitations. Patents lead to innovation only in areas where inventions have commercial potential; and given the structure of government funding, grants are awarded to a narrow range of eligible recipients.As a result, prizes have been making a comeback. “Prizes are an incentive mechanism that is particularly interesting when you want to specify the kinds of innovations you’re looking for and when you want to diversify the base of potential innovators,” says Fiona Murray, the David Sarnoff Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management in the MIT Sloan School of Management. Accordingly, in early 2011, the Obama administration established regulations explicitly designed to accelerate the adoption of “ambitious prizes in areas of national priority.”For Murray, the growing emphasis on prizes as a policy tool raises questions: What sorts of prizes work and for what; and how should prizes be structured to elicit innovation relating to the particular problems we care about? Current literature on the topic includes extensive anecdotal evidence and a “fairly significant body of economic theory that creates models of how prizes should work,” Murray says. But there is little formal analysis of empirical evidence from actual prizes — especially big prizes — and how they function “on the ground.”To fill that gap, she set out to perform a systematic study of an ongoing “Grand Innovation Prize.” Her goals were to gather insight into how a prize works in practice, and then compare that empirical evidence to the ideas of the economists who study prizes and the advocates and policymakers who design them. Seeing how those perceptions differ could help lead to the more effective use of prizes to stimulate innovation in areas where patents and grants may fail.The energy focusOne area of national concern where prizes are particularly relevant is energy. “Energy is an area where we’ve got lots of core underlying skills and expertise. But are they being focused on the right kinds of problems and on technology that fulfills the right sorts of technical criteria?” Murray asks. It’s also an area where patents and grants have limited effectiveness. In energy, she says, “it’s especially hard because the kinds of things that you might want — like a super-efficient vehicle — aren’t really valued by customers and because lots of externalities — like carbon dioxide emissions — aren’t really being priced.” With technological advances being under valued, profit-seeking inventors have little interest. In that situation, a prize is a good mechanism to focus attention and elicit new ideas and solutions.Among the many energy-related prizes offered recently, one of the biggest and most publicized is the Progressive Insurance Automotive X-Prize (PIAXP). In late 2009, the PIAXP offered a $10 million cash prize to teams that tinnitus miracle download vehicles that exceeded 100 miles per gallon equivalent and could be manufactured on a commercial scale. In addition to being a model Grand Innovation Prize, the PIAXP was supported by the X-Prize Foundation, which has had a presence on the MIT campus since 2007 through the X-Prize Lab@MIT. Murray decided that the PIAXP would make an ideal case study.Her first task was to develop a formal analytical methodology that was comprehensive, generalizable and could capture the essence of any prize being evaluated. Her approach uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate three dimensions of a prize: its objectives; its design, including initial specifications and incentives, qualification rules and award governance; and its performance, that is, its success in engendering innovation.With permission from the X-Prize Foundation, Murray, graduate student Georgina Amy Campbell SM ’11 of the Engineering Systems Division, and their collaborators began gathering information. They interviewed participating teams, as well as the PIAXP organizers and sponsors; they observed key events; and they performed periodic surveys to understand the incentives, organizational efforts and technical outcomes involved. They then compared specific aspects of the PIAXP with findings from theoretical analyses and with views put forth by policymakers and other prize advocates.Some surprising observationsOne striking feature of the PIAXP is the sheer number of participants. At the start of the competition, 111 teams entered 136 vehicles. The teams were largely supported by private money, generally provided by team members and their friends and family. Collectively, the teams spent far more on the task than the winners would get in the prize purse. Indeed, three individual teams spent more than they could have won in prize money.Those observations demonstrate a central feature of today’s prizes: They are intended to maximize effort, not efficiency. Theory assumes that prizes should be designed to elicit an efficient level of effort, that is, the maximum amount of innovation in the most productive and efficient way. “If you tell an economist that a hundred people showed up with new ideas, they’re horrified because they say that’s incredibly inefficient. All that duplication of effort!” Murray says. “But if you’re not quite sure what the solution should look like and you want to focus attention on something, then you actually don’t mind the fact that lots of people are turning up and coming with novel ideas.” A Ph.D. candidate in the Hyperinstruments Group of the MIT Media Lab has developed a new electronic sensing system to measure minute changes in the position, acceleration and strain of a violin bow.The system can be used to evaluate different bowing techniques and may expand the expressive possibilities of the violin by electronic means, according to Diana Young, who built the gesture sensing system for the Hyperbow.Young recently spoke about her work at the 151st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) in Providence, R.I., and at the sixth International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression in Paris. The Hyperbow is an enhanced bow, used in conjunction with a Hyperviolin. The latter, another product of the MIT Media Lab, is an instrument that makes no sound but creates an electronic output when played. The Hyperviolin can readily be played by anyone used to an acoustic violin. "Electronic music is a way of combining my interests in music and engineering," Young said.Young, who has a B.A. in music from Johns Hopkins University and a certificate in violin performance from the Peabody Conservatory, built the gesture-sensing system for her master's degree, which she received from MIT in 2001. Designed as a performance interface for professional violinists, the Hyperbow includes a set of accelerometers, gyroscopes and force sensors all installed on a carbon fiber bow.Because the system is wireless, it interferes only minimally with the violinist's bowing.Both the Hyperbow and the Hyperviolin have been played in concert, by the renowned violinist Joshua Bell among others; several composers, including MIT's Tod Machover, have created new compositions for them. The Hyperbow premiered at the 2002 Conference on New Instruments for Musical Expression in Dublin. (You can hear samples of Hyperviolin music on the Toy Symphony web site, www.toysymphony.net, then follow links for Sound and Images/Dublin - National Symphony Orchestra/AUDIO Samples.) The Hyperbow is just the latest in a series of Media Lab inventions on the vanguard of musical expression. Hypercello and Hyperinstruments were developed at the Media Lab by Joe Paradiso, Neil Gershenfeld and composer Tod Machover in the 1990s. An abstract of Young's paper is available via the ASA web

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    President Obama announced today that he will fulfill his pledge to address climate change by regulating carbon emissionsIn his state of the union speech this February, President Obama vowed,If Congress won't act soon to protect future generations, I will. I will direct my cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take, now and in the future, to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy.President Obama followed through on that promise today, unveiling a climate action plan that includes measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, accelerate renewable energy permitting on public lands, and prepare American infrastructure for the impacts of climate change. The centerpiece of the plan is the announcement that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, in addition to the rules already in draft form that are set to regulate emissions from new power plants. The White House released a video to explain the importance of these steps in addressing climate change by decarbonizing the economy.Republican House speaker John Boehner reacted to this news by calling the EPA regulations "absolutely crazy." However, in reality they're required by law.Under the Bush Administration, the EPA refused to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. The state of Massachusetts sued the EPA, and the case went all the way up to the US supreme court. In 2007, in a 5-4 decision with Justice Anthony Kennedy casting the deciding vote along with the four more liberal justices, the court ruled that if greenhouse gases were determined to endanger public health or welfare, the EPA would be required to regulate their emissions in accordance with the Clean Air Act.The Bush EPA delayed the decision about the threat of greenhouse gas emissions until after he left office. After President Obama took office, the EPA issued its endangerment finding in 2009. Based on an evaluation of the best available scientific evidence like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and US national climate assessments, the EPA determined that greenhouse gas emissions clearly endanger public health and welfare via their impacts on climate change.This finding meant that under the Clean Air Act, greenhouse gases meet the definition of "air pollutants," and the EPA would have to regulate their emissions from mobile and stationary sources (vehicles and power natural vitiligo treatment download emissions were regulated via new fuel efficiency standards requiring cars and light trucks to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The newly announced power plant emissions are the EPA's enforcement of the Clean Air Act requirements for stationary sources.On the one hand, with Congress refusing to implement any sort of climate legislation, regulating emissions from vehicles and power plants is the biggest single step President Obama can take to reduce American greenhouse gas emissions. He could have followed the Bush administration's strategy and tried to delay these regulations, forcing environmental groups to sue to make the courts require that the EPA enforce the law. On the other hand, that is really all the Obama administration is doing – enforcing the law. Any opposition complaints that this decision is "crazy" or bypassing Congress are factually and legally wrong.In fact, if Republicans want to eliminate these regulations, all they need to do is pass climate legislation to supersede them. A growing number of conservatives support implementation of a carbon fee and dividend system, for example. At the moment the majority of Republicans in Congress seem to deny that climate change is human-caused and/or a problem, and oppose taking any steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are now only two options available to them – let the government regulate greenhouse gas emissions, or pass climate legislation. Philosophically, Republicans generally oppose government regulations and support free-market solutions like carbon pricing; however, it appears that congressional Republicans would rather force the Obama administration to regulate emissions and then accuse them of "killing jobs", as Speaker Boehner already has. On the contrary, studies have shown that EPA regulations generally have a modestly positive impact on the economy and jobs. A national study by the University of Massachusetts at Amherst also found that every dollar invested in clean energy creates two to three times as many jobs as putting that same dollar into coal, oil, and natural gas.Ultimately the Obama administration deserves credit for implementing these greenhouse gas regulations in a timely manner rather than delaying as the previous administration did. His emphasis on the importance of decarbonizing the economy to address the threat of climate change in a comprehensive climate action plan is a major step towards addressing the threat of climate change. It's also important to remember that these regulations are required trademiner download and if congressional Republicans don't like them, they should propose a better solution of their own.Climate changeCarbon emissionsClimate change scepticismClimate changeBarack ObamaObama administrationJohn BoehnerDana Nuccitelliguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Swedish House Mafia — the disc jockeys and producers Axwell, Sebastian Ingrosso and Steve Angello, of Stockholm — came to the Barclays Center on their “One Last Tour.”Provisional figure, which includes 'opportunity costs' for police, well below £10m suggested by some in mediaLady Thatcher's ceremonial funeral with full military honours cost the taxpayer an estimated £3.6m, Downing Street has said.About £500,000 was spent on the service at St Paul's Cathedral, a reception for guests at Mansion House, and the printing and circulation of invitations to the congregation of 2,300 guests.The provisional figure includes £2m "opportunity costs" for police who would have been on other duties on the day. A further estimated £1.1m was spent on providing additional security and policing for the ceremony and funeral procession from the Palace of Westminster to St Clement Danes, the RAF chapel in the Strand, where Thatcher's coffin was transferred from a hearse to a gun carriage and then given a military escort to the cathedral.The scale of the funeral for Britain's first and only female prime minister was for a politician second only to Sir Winston Churchill's state funeral in 1965. It was attended by the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, leading politicians and guests drawn from about 170 countries.Her family are understood to have paid for the funeral flowers and the undertaking costs. No figure has been released for those.The Cabinet Office said that the ceremonial costs of £500,000 also included costs incurred by the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign Office. The department is collating the final total of all public money spent and the confirmed figures are to be published before the summer recess, but are not expected to be vastly different to the estimated costs released on Thursday. The amount is considerably less than the £10m figure which had been suggested by some in the media.More than 4,000 police officers were deployed in a huge security operation on the day of the funeral, on 17 April, two days after the Boston marathon bombings. Fears of tinnitus miracle download and disruption were not realised and there were no arrests.Six police forces from outside London sent specialist officers to help with escorting foreign dignitaries.Following the funeral service, Thatcher's close family and friends, led by her daughter Carol, son Mark and his two children, attended a private cremation at Mortlake crematorium in south-west London.Thatcher died on 8 April, aged 87, following a stroke while sitting in bed reading in the Ritz hotel suite she had been staying in while recuperating from a bladder operation.Margaret ThatcherLondonCaroline Daviesguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Daniel Nava hit a two-out single in the top of the 10th inning to score pinch-runner Jackie Bradley Jr., and the Boston Red Sox rallied from a four-run deficit for the second time in a four-game series to beat the Seattle Mariners 8-7 in 10 innings on Thursday.     Readers solve the mystery of a 23-year-old woman with a terrible headache who kept getting worse.     Move over, male models. The face of men’s fragrance is now a leading man from the big or small screen.     In Milan, many designers reworked the suit while Miuccia Prada pondered the notion of paradise.     Residents at Alwyn Court were told that they would have to leave their homes once again next weekend while the crane atop the tower One57 was repaired.     The bride is the executive assistant to the artistic director of the Public Theater in New York; the groom is a vice president at Credit Suisse.     The Times launches a new column on global warming and energy. U.S. stocks fell last week, sending the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index to a three-month low, on growing uncertainty over European leaders' plans to halt the debt crisis and economic data that raised doubts about the strength of the economic recovery. Talks with the musicians, who went on strike on Wednesday, mainly over wage issues, broke down on Sunday evening. Ben Hope and Laura Dreyfuss will succeed Steve Kazee and Cristin Milioti in the musical’s lead roles. Statement posted on jihadist website says attacks were 'first phase' as Iraqi wing of al-Qaida regains strengthAl-Qaida has claimed responsibility for a wave of bombings and suicide attacks that killed about 60 people on the 10th aquaponics 4 you review the US-led invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein.Islamic State of Iraq, the country's al-Qaida wing, is regaining strength and has carried out dozens of high-profile attacks since the start of the year.On Tuesday car bombs, roadside explosions and suicide attacks hit mainly Shia districts and security forces in Baghdad and other cities."What has reached you on Tuesday is just the first drop of rain, and a first phase, for by God's will, after this we will have our revenge," said an al-Qaida statement posted on a jihadist website late on Tuesday.Sunni Islamists see Iraq's Shia-led government as oppressors of the country's Sunni minority and target Shias to try to provoke a sectarian confrontation like the inter-communal slaughter that killed thousands in 2006-7.Since January suicide bombers have struck at a rate of nearly twice a week, the worst for several years.Iraq's sectarian and political rivalries are still raw and its power-sharing government – split among Shia, Sunni and Kurdish factions – has been all but paralysed by disputes for more than a year.The conflict in nearby Syria is stirring up Iraq's volatile mix, exposing the country to the rivalry between Turkey, which backs Sunni rebels fighting President Bashar al-Assad, and Iran, which sponsors him.Iraqal-QaidaMiddle East and North Africaguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The North American porcupine Photo: Mike Cuccarese Memorable black commanders in chief have been harder to come by on the big screen, and as with their real-life counterparts, they get their way only some of the time.     The Missoni company announced on Thursday that the wreckage of the small aircraft carrying Vittorio Missoni had been discovered in the waters north of the resort of Los Roques.     The people tapped by Hugo Chavez to carry on his socialist revolution seem to be improvising the rules of governing as they march toward what most Venezuelans consider certain victory in a mid-April vote to replace the late president. Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering research scientist Michael Short '05, SM '10, PhD '10 is an exemplar of interdisciplinary knowledge, with Institute degrees in both nuclear science and engineering and materials science and engineering. “Interdisciplinary work is where the fun stuff is; it’s where you forex growth bot work on challenges that many people consider too difficult, or that require a broader perspective,” he says.But there’s another dimension to Short’s interdisciplinary skill set — extensive hands-on metalworking experience, which amplifies the value of his academic learning and his ability to address challenging problems in fission reactor development.“In my freshman year, I started Course 22 and took a blacksmithing class. I’ve stayed with both ever since,” says Short, who is also a staff member at the Institute’s cross-departmental Uhlig Corrosion Laboratory. “The combination has led me to many advances in the research realm. You can theorize about a part or a model, but if you’ve held a piece of hot steel in your hands, you’ll have better insight into how it will behave. You pick up intuitive knowledge; the combination of that and book knowledge is worth more than the sum of the parts.”For this reason, Short takes his students in class 22.033, Nuclear Systems Design, beyond books and paper. “The students heat-treat metal using the forge in Building 4, and see how an improperly treated piece becomes brittle and breaks apart, while a well-treated one stays tough and strong,” he explains. Short has also abandoned laser pointers in class, instead using a different reactor part each week as a visual aid. This gives students a tangible sense of what they’re studying and working on — a challenge with nuclear reactors.Read full article Bundesliga minnows Freiburg are in contention for a Champions League spot but coach Christian Streich is already planning next season's relegation battle as his players are lured away by bigger clubs.     Edward J. Snowden was scheduled to depart Moscow on a flight bound for Cuba, but several reporters said they did not see him on the plane.     A thriving black market in sea cucumbers — sluglike marine animals considered a delicacy in China — has set off a maritime gold rush up and down the Yucatán Peninsula. MARYLAND'S BID to impose a nickel fee on paper and plastic bags fell victim last year to election-year jitters. Lawmakers didn't want to go near anything that had a whiff of a tax increase. But sponsors of a bag tax, buoyed by the success of the District's effort and by important support from Gov.... MOGADISHU, Somalia - A medical official says 13 people died in mortar attacks in Somalia's

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    “Lucky Guy,” starring Tom Hanks, has recouped its capitalization costs after eight weeks of performances.     News of the former South African leader’s downturn used the strongest language yet after three weeks of hospitalization.     To further collaboration, build ongoing relationships, facilitate discussions and share information of value to other departments. MEXICO CITY - Mexican President Felipe Calderon will protest to U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington next week about Arizona's crackdown on illegal immigrants, Calderon told Reuters Thursday. March 17-20 — Annual league meeting, Phoenix There are more than a dozen restaurants, cafes, sandwich bars and formal dining rooms on the Hill — almost all good for people watching, when you can get in. Prometheus, the mythological figure who stole fire from the gods, was punished for this theft by being bound to a rock. Each day, an eagle swept down and fed on his liver, which then grew back to be eaten again the next day. Modern scientists know there is a grain of truth to the tale, says MIT engineer Sangeeta Bhatia: The liver can indeed regenerate itself if part of it is removed. However, researchers trying to exploit that ability in hopes of producing artificial liver tissue for transplantation have repeatedly been stymied: Mature liver cells, known as hepatocytes, quickly lose their normal function when removed from the body. “It’s a paradox because we know liver cells are capable of growing, but somehow we can’t get them to grow” outside the body, says Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, a senior associate member of the Broad Institute and a member of MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science.Now, Bhatia and colleagues have taken a step toward that goal. In a paper appearing in the June 2 issue of Nature Chemical Biology, they have identified a dozen chemical compounds that can help liver cells not only maintain their normal function while grown in a lab dish, but also multiply to produce new tissue. Today, the results of an early study on a controversial treatment for M.S. will be released. After a lot of testing I found the culprit, and it was a quite unexpected one to me.Read full postPosted in Browsers, CSS.Copyright © Roger Johansson Winding up the Guardian Northerner's debate on entering journalism, Clare Speak argues for optimism and ploughing your own furrowI can understand Glen Keogh's frustration, in his post which began this Guardian Northerner debate, at still not having found a job despite following all the advice. As we're increasingly finding that this advice no longer works, more and more would-be journalists now have to make their own opportunities in order to get ahead.Technological advances and budget cuts mean that the publishing industry has seen big changes in the last few years, and the traditional route of university followed by an unpaid internship or two, firing off applications and then hopefully getting a staff reporter job simply no longer applies. Staff positions are disappearing, and for most of us, doing an unpaid internship in London is about as practical and affordable as two weeks on the moon. There are other ways in though, and you don't have to work in a call centre whilst waiting for your big break either.Like Mischa Wilmers in his contribution to the debate, I looked abroad in lieu of any decent work opportunities at home, though I didn't have quite such a well laid-out plan. Unemployed and with no better ideas, I decided to natural vitiligo treatment download (teaching English as a foreign language) as it would allow me to travel and do something with my love of the subject. I moved to Prague in 2009 to start teaching, with a vague hope that by the time my little adventure abroad was over, the job market at home might have picked up.As it turns out, I never came back. After a few years of doing freelance work on the side of teaching or admin jobs, I've decided to stay in the Czech Republic and freelance full time from here. I'm in no rush to join the hordes chasing a few staff jobs in London, or to go back to my home town of Rochdale to brush up on my waitressing skills. Although I earn less here than I would at home, my standard of living is higher: taxes are lower, the sun shines more often, trains come on time and the beer is £1 a half-litre. Need I go on?Obviously not everyone can just swan off to a foreign country – or to London – but there's nothing stopping you from getting some experience wherever you are. I'm not a big fan of internships, but writing the occasional unpaid piece from home isn't quite on a par with six months' free labour.Freelancing can get you anything from a bit of work experience to a full-time occupation. Forget filling out application forms, and bypass the HR department. If you've got a dazzling story idea, approach the editor directly. What have you got to lose? If you can't chase down an editor to ask for a few assignments, what hope have you got of chasing down the information needed to write a great story?With more and more companies looking to cut costs and outsource work to freelancers, it's really not a bad time to start. Increasingly fewer publications have the financial security to hire people on permanent contracts, meaning that freelancers are becoming ever more important. Not to mention that as the industry continues to contract, working for a company no longer offers more security than being self-employed.And being far from London (or Salford) is no disadvantage. In fact, I'm convinced that the further you are from the editors you work for, the more valuable you can be to them. As budgets decrease, fewer publications can afford to send staff out to wherever the story is.Freelancing is often seen as the domain of seasoned pros who've spent 20 years working in staff positions, but there's no reason why it should be. As long as your ideas are good, you can do the work. In reality, I've found that no editor will be interested in your life story or which school you went to, as long as you can write something interesting which doesn't take a full afternoon to edit.New freelancers and those looking for a staff position alike often trip themselves up by focusing only on working for 'glamorous' and well-known titles. Go for the nationals if you like, though a much better bet would be the local paper (as Grace Newton argues in her contribution to the Guardian Northerner debate), niche magazines or trade publications. Carving out your own path is never easy, but if you're not prepared to do something difficult to get where you want to be, maybe you should reconsider your decision to work in such an intensely competitive profession. Clare Speak is a freelance writer based in Prague, specialising in business, technology and travel. She is on clare.speak@seznam.cz and Tweets here.This concludes our debate. You can read previous contributions - and join the wonderful world of the trademiner download - via our home page here. Many thanks to all who have taken part both by sending posts and contributing to threads, and warm wishes and good luck to you all.Young peopleEmployabilityJournalism educationCzech Republicguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds This month, Whole Foods became the first retailer in the country to announce that it would require its more than 300 stores to label all food containing genetically modified ingredients. The move, to be phased in over five years, marked the latest salvo in a decades-long, global fight over the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) such as corn, cotton and soybeans in food. As the use of GMOs in a wide range of products has proliferated, so has the argument over whether they are safe for humans and the environment, whether they deserve more scrutiny from regulators and how they should be labeled. Read full article >> About two years ago, while many Americans were watching President Obama's inauguration and my former colleagues in the Bush administration were cleaning out their offices, I was flying home from The Hague, where the International Court of Justice had just ruled against the United States in a case I... Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw and Henry Barnes review The Paperboy, Beyond the Hills, The Spirit of '45 and The Incredible Burt WonderstoneXan BrooksPeter BradshawHenry BarnesAndrew PulverPhil Maynard "It felt good, it went in and I fell to the ground," Douglas Davis said after his buzzer-beater beat Harvard to send Princeton to the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2004. A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on September 13, 2006 (download PDF). The Planetarium at the Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum in Centerport is reopening after a renovation, including a new projection system. Andrew Scott and Eran Ben-Joseph. ReNew Town: Adaptive Urbanism and the Low Carbon Community (Routledge). Chia-Chiao Lin, an Institute Professor Emeritus at MIT who played a pivotal role in the development of applied mathematics both in the United States and in China, died Sunday in Beijing. He was 96. The cause of death was heart failure, Lin’s family said. Lin’s broad and seminal research, together with his service to the community, were instrumental in the growth of applied mathematics at MIT and elsewhere in the United States. More recently, he had helped build the field in China as a Distinguished Professor at Tsinghua University since 2002.  Lin joined MIT as an associate professor of applied mathematics in 1947, becoming a full professor in 1953. In 1966, he was named an Institute Professor — MIT’s most prestigious faculty appointment. He retired from MIT in 1987.  Real-world applicationsLin was an applied mathematician whose research initially concentrated on fluid mechanics, focusing on hydrodynamics stability and turbulence, and addressing the aerodynamics of gas turbines, oscillating airfoils and shock waves. His doctoral dissertation solved an outstanding problem, stemming from Werner Heisenberg’s work, concerning the stability of parallel flows. He also resolved a long-standing problem concerning the theory of asymptotic solutions of ordinary differential equations (of higher order than 2), which are uniformly valid around turning points.  With Theodore von Kármán, his thesis advisor, Lin proposed a spectral theory for homogeneous turbulence, further developing von Kármán’s similarity theory and the statistical theory of turbulence. These investigations in hydrodynamic stability and turbulence greatly impacted engineering and science fields dealing with fluid flow, including geophysical fluid dynamics. In 1955, Lin published a monograph titled “The Theory of Hydrodynamic Stability,” the tinnitus miracle download publication in this developing field. Lin’s research interests then turned to problems in the hydrodynamics of superfluid helium and astrophysics. In 1964, in collaboration with Frank Shu of the University of California at Berkeley, Lin advanced the density-wave theory of galaxy formation (based on the earlier work of Bertil Lindblad) to account for sustained spiral structures. He also contributed to related problems in gravitational collapse and star formation. In 1974 Lin co-authored, with his former student L. A. Segel, the now-classic treatise, “Mathematics Applied to Deterministic Problems in the Natural Sciences.” More recently, in 1996, with Giuseppe Bertin, he published another monograph, “Spiral Structure in Galaxies: A Density Wave Theory.”Contributions in ChinaFor many years, Lin was interested in the development of science and education in China. In 1972, as the deputy leader of a delegation of Chinese-born American scientists, Lin returned to his homeland, receiving a warm welcome from Premier Zhou Enlai and other leaders. He visited China regularly in the ensuing years, inviting many well-known experts to give lectures there. He also facilitated study and research by Chinese scholars at MIT — many of whom have since become leaders in various fields in China. In 2002, Lin returned to his alma mater, Tsinghua University, as Distinguished Professor. He founded the Zhou Pei-Yuan Center for Applied Mathematics — now an active hub of research in quantitative biology, applied partial differential equations, scientific computation, and other interdisciplinary subjects linking mathematics, natural sciences and engineering — and served as its honorary director, undertaking research on protein folding. He worked tirelessly at Tsinghua University to set an example for young researchers, overseeing the research of more than 10 PhD students. Lin was also a visiting professor of mathematics at Florida State University from 1994 to 2011.A celebrated scholarLin was born July 7, 1916, in Beijing. He received a BSc in physics from Tsinghua University in 1937 and an MSc in applied mathematics from the University of Toronto in 1941. He then earned his PhD, in aeronautics, from the California Institute of Technology in 1944; Caltech honored Lin with its Distinguished Alumni Award in 1992.Lin did postdoctoral work at the Jet Propulsion Lab before joining the faculty of Brown University in 1945 as an assistant professor of applied mathematics, becoming an associate professor in 1946. He joined MIT’s mathematics faculty the following year.Twice named a Guggenheim Fellow, in 1954 and 1960, Lin received major recognitions from a variety of professional societies, including the Otto Laporte Award of the American Physical Society. In 1975, he received the Timoshenko Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering “for outstanding contributions to fluid mechanics, especially to hydrodynamic stability and turbulence, superfluid helium, aerodynamics and galactic structures.” He received the Award in Applied Mathematics and Numerical Analysis from the National Academy of Sciences in 1977 and the first Fluid Dynamic Prize of the American Physical Society in 1979. In 1981, the MIT faculty selected Lin for the James R. Killian Jr. Faculty Achievement Award; he delivered the Killian Lecture to the MIT community in the spring of 1982. Lin’s Killian Award citation noted that he was highly influential in “developing a more comprehensive approach to applied mathematics.” Within MIT’s Department of Mathematics, Lin served as the first faculty chair of the applied mathematics group, from 1961 to 1966. He was president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics from 1973 to 1974, and a member of its board of trustees from 1978 to 1980. Lin held honorary doctorates from the Chinese University of Hong Kong (1973), Tsinghua University (1987) and Taiwan’s National Tsing Hua University (2005). aquaponics 4 you review also, his family said, an honorary professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and at Nankai University. His professional honors included selection as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1951), as academician of Academia Sinica (1958), as a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1962), and as a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (1994).Lin was twice a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, in 1959 to 1960 and 1965 to 1966. He was also a member or fellow of the American Astronomical Society, the American Mathematical Society, the American Physical Society, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, and the Institute of Aerospace Sciences.Lin is survived by his wife of 66 years, Shouying Liang Lin, of Beijing and Cambridge, Mass.; daughter Lillian Shengjung Lin and her husband, Alan Stephen Crawford, of Decatur, Ga.; sister Xiaoyuan Lin and her husband, Shukai Li; sister Xiaoying Lin and her husband, Junjie Gu; and brother-in-law Hongmo Dong. He is also survived by stepgrandson Scott Crawford and his wife, Shay, and their children; stepgrandson Joshua Taylor and his wife, Sarah, and their children; stepgranddaughter Yolanda Jones and her husband, Darius, and their children; and numerous cousins, nephews, nieces, great-nephews, and great-nieces.Lin was preceded in death by his son Edward; brother Jiaxin Lin and his wife, Shunzu Huang; brother Jiatian Lin; brother Jiakeng Lin and his wife, Kanghuai Cheng; sister Xiaohua Lin; brother-in-law Shoupan Liang and his wife, He Fu; brother-in-law Shouchu Liang; and sister-in-law Shoubin Liang and her husband, Xiaoshen Chen. With the economy rapidly weakening, some senior Democrats are having second thoughts about raising taxes on the nation's wealthiest families and are pressing party leaders to consider extending the full array of Bush administration tax cuts, at least through next year. On their daily cable car rides to and from home in Venezuela's capital, Maria Gonzalez and Jose Rafael Suarez soar in a bubble of safety far above the deadly, trash-strewn streets below. The Department of Homeland Security yesterday named a former Maryland official and ex-Marine to coordinate disaster and anti-terrorism preparations for the D.C. area. The MIT introductory biology course now being offered online through edX is simultaneously something old and something new: a version of a beloved MIT course that for decades has been taught by senior faculty to packed lecture halls, and the latest offering of the interactive learning platform launched less than a year ago by MIT and Harvard University.MIT’s 7.00x (Introduction to Biology: “The Secret of Life”), which began March 5 and runs for 12 weeks, is one of three new courses offered this semester through edX. There are now six MIT edX courses in total. The online course is taught by senior members of the MIT Department of Biology: Eric Lander and Graham Walker. “It gives us a chance to rethink the course and to think about new ways to use electronic media at MIT, and that’s pretty exciting,” says Lander, a professor of biology who is also director of the Broad Institute. This semester, there are 15 new courses on edX — including the first offerings in the humanities and social sciences — from MITx, HarvardX and BerkeleyX, in addition to reprises of 10 existing courses from these three universities. Courses on edX have attracted more than 700,000 registrants from around the world and are attracting about 100,000 more each month.Even though the biology course was retooled for the Web, it aspires to capture the feel of the course that is taught on campus.“It’s the whole MIT culture,” Lander says. “In many places, people talk about not forex growth bot teach, while at MIT it’s the reverse. The most active faculty here want to be in the classroom.”Lander, who’ll host the online course, has taught 7.00 to MIT students in the classroom for close to 20 years. He led the Human Genome Project that in the 1990s sequenced human genes, recently won a $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Life Science, and is co-chair of President Barack Obama’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology.The introductory biology course has been required at MIT since the early 1990s; for close to 15 years, Lander co-taught it alongside colleague Robert Weinberg, who also recently won a $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Life Science for his research on human cancer genes. “At many universities, senior faculty are excused from heavy teaching. But their knowledge makes them more effective in the classroom,” Weinberg says. “It’s a feather in MIT’s cap.” It’s not just Lander and Weinberg teaching 7.00: Sallie “Penny” Chisholm, who received the National Medal of Science in December, also teaches it to MIT freshmen in the classroom. Having such faculty teach an introductory course in the classroom and online inspires students to learn in a way textbooks cannot, Walker says. “It brings a perspective of someone who’s on the cutting edge. That person teaches in a completely different way,” he says. “What’s in the textbook is old. Eric, for example, mentions things that are happening last week or month. It’s very dynamic and challenging, and students pick up on the excitement.”The other two courses launching this spring from MIT are 8.02x (Electricity and Magnetism), led by Walter Lewin, a professor emeritus of physics, and 14.73x (The Challenges of Global Poverty), taught by Esther Duflo, the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics.Lander says he wanted to teach the online course because it created an opportunity for him and MIT. “It was a chance to rethink this class I loved and taught for 20 years with new technology,” he says. To make the course work on the Web, Lander, Walker and their biology department colleagues began to meet weekly last September. “We had to think about many, many things,” Lander says, “like how to make people feel like they were in a classroom.”To do that, an Interrotron — the signature device used by Cambridge documentary filmmaker Errol Morris for getting unsettling close-ups — was set up in the middle of the classroom to record lectures, Lander says. Biographical films were also made of the biology faculty.The course is designed for students without any background in biology. The faculty team had to rework the curriculum for edX, devise problems for class, make videos of lab work, and make supplemental videos to show how experiments work. MIT also purchased computer-based protein and gene viewers so online students could view genes and proteins that were previously exhibited in the classroom as models or illustrations. The teachers started using that technology in the classroom, as well.“Instead of giving them a little toy problem about a human gene, now our students can scan a whole gene using computer-based viewers,” Lander says.  “The new technology in our own classrooms is a great thing.”Walker said the edX course is spurring MIT to adapt technology that will improve the way instructors teach students in the classroom.“The software and tools will have a revolutionary effect on how we teach on campus,” Walker says. Pope Francis described the spiritual bond between Catholics and Jews as “very special” and expressed gratitude to Muslim leaders. Each team is allowed three assistant coaches, but when support staffers are added in, there seem to be more. Way

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    President Obama announced today that he will fulfill his pledge to address climate change by regulating carbon emissionsIn his state of the union speech this February, President Obama vowed,If Congress won't act soon to protect future generations, I will. I will direct my cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take, now and in the future, to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy.President Obama followed through on that promise today, unveiling a climate action plan that includes measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, accelerate renewable energy permitting on public lands, and prepare American infrastructure for the impacts of climate change. The centerpiece of the plan is the announcement that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, in addition to the rules already in draft form that are set to regulate emissions from new power plants. The White House released a video to explain the importance of these steps in addressing climate change by decarbonizing the economy.Republican House speaker John Boehner reacted to this news by calling the EPA regulations "absolutely crazy." However, in reality they're required by law.Under the Bush Administration, the EPA refused to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. The state of Massachusetts sued the EPA, and the case went all the way up to the US supreme court. In 2007, in a 5-4 decision with Justice Anthony Kennedy casting the deciding vote along with the four more liberal justices, the court ruled that if greenhouse gases were determined to endanger public health or welfare, the EPA would be required to regulate their emissions in accordance with the Clean Air Act.The Bush EPA delayed the decision about the threat of greenhouse gas emissions until after he left office. After President Obama took office, the EPA issued its endangerment finding in 2009. Based on an evaluation of the best available scientific evidence like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and US national climate assessments, the EPA determined that greenhouse gas emissions clearly endanger public health and welfare via their impacts on climate change.This finding meant that under the Clean Air Act, greenhouse gases meet the definition of "air pollutants," and the EPA would have to regulate their emissions from mobile and stationary sources (vehicles and power natural vitiligo treatment download emissions were regulated via new fuel efficiency standards requiring cars and light trucks to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The newly announced power plant emissions are the EPA's enforcement of the Clean Air Act requirements for stationary sources.On the one hand, with Congress refusing to implement any sort of climate legislation, regulating emissions from vehicles and power plants is the biggest single step President Obama can take to reduce American greenhouse gas emissions. He could have followed the Bush administration's strategy and tried to delay these regulations, forcing environmental groups to sue to make the courts require that the EPA enforce the law. On the other hand, that is really all the Obama administration is doing – enforcing the law. Any opposition complaints that this decision is "crazy" or bypassing Congress are factually and legally wrong.In fact, if Republicans want to eliminate these regulations, all they need to do is pass climate legislation to supersede them. A growing number of conservatives support implementation of a carbon fee and dividend system, for example. At the moment the majority of Republicans in Congress seem to deny that climate change is human-caused and/or a problem, and oppose taking any steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are now only two options available to them – let the government regulate greenhouse gas emissions, or pass climate legislation. Philosophically, Republicans generally oppose government regulations and support free-market solutions like carbon pricing; however, it appears that congressional Republicans would rather force the Obama administration to regulate emissions and then accuse them of "killing jobs", as Speaker Boehner already has. On the contrary, studies have shown that EPA regulations generally have a modestly positive impact on the economy and jobs. A national study by the University of Massachusetts at Amherst also found that every dollar invested in clean energy creates two to three times as many jobs as putting that same dollar into coal, oil, and natural gas.Ultimately the Obama administration deserves credit for implementing these greenhouse gas regulations in a timely manner rather than delaying as the previous administration did. His emphasis on the importance of decarbonizing the economy to address the threat of climate change in a comprehensive climate action plan is a major step towards addressing the threat of climate change. It's also important to remember that these regulations are required trademiner download and if congressional Republicans don't like them, they should propose a better solution of their own.Climate changeCarbon emissionsClimate change scepticismClimate changeBarack ObamaObama administrationJohn BoehnerDana Nuccitelliguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Swedish House Mafia — the disc jockeys and producers Axwell, Sebastian Ingrosso and Steve Angello, of Stockholm — came to the Barclays Center on their “One Last Tour.”Provisional figure, which includes 'opportunity costs' for police, well below £10m suggested by some in mediaLady Thatcher's ceremonial funeral with full military honours cost the taxpayer an estimated £3.6m, Downing Street has said.About £500,000 was spent on the service at St Paul's Cathedral, a reception for guests at Mansion House, and the printing and circulation of invitations to the congregation of 2,300 guests.The provisional figure includes £2m "opportunity costs" for police who would have been on other duties on the day. A further estimated £1.1m was spent on providing additional security and policing for the ceremony and funeral procession from the Palace of Westminster to St Clement Danes, the RAF chapel in the Strand, where Thatcher's coffin was transferred from a hearse to a gun carriage and then given a military escort to the cathedral.The scale of the funeral for Britain's first and only female prime minister was for a politician second only to Sir Winston Churchill's state funeral in 1965. It was attended by the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, leading politicians and guests drawn from about 170 countries.Her family are understood to have paid for the funeral flowers and the undertaking costs. No figure has been released for those.The Cabinet Office said that the ceremonial costs of £500,000 also included costs incurred by the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign Office. The department is collating the final total of all public money spent and the confirmed figures are to be published before the summer recess, but are not expected to be vastly different to the estimated costs released on Thursday. The amount is considerably less than the £10m figure which had been suggested by some in the media.More than 4,000 police officers were deployed in a huge security operation on the day of the funeral, on 17 April, two days after the Boston marathon bombings. Fears of tinnitus miracle download and disruption were not realised and there were no arrests.Six police forces from outside London sent specialist officers to help with escorting foreign dignitaries.Following the funeral service, Thatcher's close family and friends, led by her daughter Carol, son Mark and his two children, attended a private cremation at Mortlake crematorium in south-west London.Thatcher died on 8 April, aged 87, following a stroke while sitting in bed reading in the Ritz hotel suite she had been staying in while recuperating from a bladder operation.Margaret ThatcherLondonCaroline Daviesguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Daniel Nava hit a two-out single in the top of the 10th inning to score pinch-runner Jackie Bradley Jr., and the Boston Red Sox rallied from a four-run deficit for the second time in a four-game series to beat the Seattle Mariners 8-7 in 10 innings on Thursday.     Readers solve the mystery of a 23-year-old woman with a terrible headache who kept getting worse.     Move over, male models. The face of men’s fragrance is now a leading man from the big or small screen.     In Milan, many designers reworked the suit while Miuccia Prada pondered the notion of paradise.     Residents at Alwyn Court were told that they would have to leave their homes once again next weekend while the crane atop the tower One57 was repaired.     The bride is the executive assistant to the artistic director of the Public Theater in New York; the groom is a vice president at Credit Suisse.     The Times launches a new column on global warming and energy. U.S. stocks fell last week, sending the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index to a three-month low, on growing uncertainty over European leaders' plans to halt the debt crisis and economic data that raised doubts about the strength of the economic recovery. Talks with the musicians, who went on strike on Wednesday, mainly over wage issues, broke down on Sunday evening. Ben Hope and Laura Dreyfuss will succeed Steve Kazee and Cristin Milioti in the musical’s lead roles. Statement posted on jihadist website says attacks were 'first phase' as Iraqi wing of al-Qaida regains strengthAl-Qaida has claimed responsibility for a wave of bombings and suicide attacks that killed about 60 people on the 10th aquaponics 4 you review the US-led invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein.Islamic State of Iraq, the country's al-Qaida wing, is regaining strength and has carried out dozens of high-profile attacks since the start of the year.On Tuesday car bombs, roadside explosions and suicide attacks hit mainly Shia districts and security forces in Baghdad and other cities."What has reached you on Tuesday is just the first drop of rain, and a first phase, for by God's will, after this we will have our revenge," said an al-Qaida statement posted on a jihadist website late on Tuesday.Sunni Islamists see Iraq's Shia-led government as oppressors of the country's Sunni minority and target Shias to try to provoke a sectarian confrontation like the inter-communal slaughter that killed thousands in 2006-7.Since January suicide bombers have struck at a rate of nearly twice a week, the worst for several years.Iraq's sectarian and political rivalries are still raw and its power-sharing government – split among Shia, Sunni and Kurdish factions – has been all but paralysed by disputes for more than a year.The conflict in nearby Syria is stirring up Iraq's volatile mix, exposing the country to the rivalry between Turkey, which backs Sunni rebels fighting President Bashar al-Assad, and Iran, which sponsors him.Iraqal-QaidaMiddle East and North Africaguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The North American porcupine Photo: Mike Cuccarese Memorable black commanders in chief have been harder to come by on the big screen, and as with their real-life counterparts, they get their way only some of the time.     The Missoni company announced on Thursday that the wreckage of the small aircraft carrying Vittorio Missoni had been discovered in the waters north of the resort of Los Roques.     The people tapped by Hugo Chavez to carry on his socialist revolution seem to be improvising the rules of governing as they march toward what most Venezuelans consider certain victory in a mid-April vote to replace the late president. Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering research scientist Michael Short '05, SM '10, PhD '10 is an exemplar of interdisciplinary knowledge, with Institute degrees in both nuclear science and engineering and materials science and engineering. “Interdisciplinary work is where the fun stuff is; it’s where you forex growth bot work on challenges that many people consider too difficult, or that require a broader perspective,” he says.But there’s another dimension to Short’s interdisciplinary skill set — extensive hands-on metalworking experience, which amplifies the value of his academic learning and his ability to address challenging problems in fission reactor development.“In my freshman year, I started Course 22 and took a blacksmithing class. I’ve stayed with both ever since,” says Short, who is also a staff member at the Institute’s cross-departmental Uhlig Corrosion Laboratory. “The combination has led me to many advances in the research realm. You can theorize about a part or a model, but if you’ve held a piece of hot steel in your hands, you’ll have better insight into how it will behave. You pick up intuitive knowledge; the combination of that and book knowledge is worth more than the sum of the parts.”For this reason, Short takes his students in class 22.033, Nuclear Systems Design, beyond books and paper. “The students heat-treat metal using the forge in Building 4, and see how an improperly treated piece becomes brittle and breaks apart, while a well-treated one stays tough and strong,” he explains. Short has also abandoned laser pointers in class, instead using a different reactor part each week as a visual aid. This gives students a tangible sense of what they’re studying and working on — a challenge with nuclear reactors.Read full article Bundesliga minnows Freiburg are in contention for a Champions League spot but coach Christian Streich is already planning next season's relegation battle as his players are lured away by bigger clubs.     Edward J. Snowden was scheduled to depart Moscow on a flight bound for Cuba, but several reporters said they did not see him on the plane.     A thriving black market in sea cucumbers — sluglike marine animals considered a delicacy in China — has set off a maritime gold rush up and down the Yucatán Peninsula. MARYLAND'S BID to impose a nickel fee on paper and plastic bags fell victim last year to election-year jitters. Lawmakers didn't want to go near anything that had a whiff of a tax increase. But sponsors of a bag tax, buoyed by the success of the District's effort and by important support from Gov.... 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    Dominant teams of the 1980s produce flashes of highest quality which suggest gap to Manchester and London leaders can closeBright spring sunshine bathed England's third football city in a warm, distinctly flattering light on Sunday. It was the sort of afternoon when the hurt involved in Liverpool falling behind Manchester and London in the domestic game's pecking order could be, albeit temporarily, forgotten.As a string of 1980s pop hits boomed out of the Anfield sound system before kick-off, the clock seemed to rewind to a time when Liverpool and Everton were the pre-eminent football forces in the land.Once the game actually kicked off that notion was swiftly dismissed – and yet amid much typical derby scrapping there were some moments of class that belonged at the Premier League's top table.Regardless of the little detail that Everton are poised to finish above their neighbours from across Stanley Park for a second successive season, most such flashes came from Liverpool and Philippe Coutinho in particular.If the 20-year-old Brazilian midfielder's marker-deceiving turns, inventive passes and incisive movement explained why Southampton's Mauricio Pochettino – Coutinho's coach at Espanyol – described Rodgers's January import from Internazionale as a hybrid of Lionel Messi and Ronaldinho, he also served as a reminder of two things.First, although Jamie Carragher's final derby before retirement may have marked the end of a sporadically glorious Anfield era, sufficient talent remains to ensure that Manchester and London are unlikely to regard Merseyside with pity more than fear indefinitely. Secondly, Brendan Rodgers owes a considerable debt to Rafael Benítez.Liverpool's manager seems a little wary of the Spaniard who once occupied his office with distinction, yet Benítez – whose arrival for a brief stint at Inter coincided with Coutinho's from South America – recommended Liverpool sign a midfield creator who should be challenging Gareth Bale and Luis Suárez for all sorts of awards next term.Moreover Rodgers, widely regarded as inheriting a poisoned chalice when he swapped Swansea for Anfield last summer, also appears to have been done some transfer market favours by his immediate predecessor, Kenny Dalglish, after all.Admittedly Dalglish paid top dollar for Andy Carroll, Stewart Downing and Jordan Henderson, and Carroll is on loan at West Ham, future uncertain, but, after the most underwhelming of beginnings, the last two of that trio are finally emerging from hibernation.Those who initially believed Henderson to be a midfield dud dumped on Dalglish via some smart hype from his old club Sunderland and their former manager Steve Bruce especially, are – almost imperceptibly – changing their minds.Early on he unleashed a 70-yard defence-splitting, Gerrard-esque, perhaps even Hoddle-esque, pass in Daniel Sturridge's direction. With a little luck it might have produced a goal and Henderson – who came off to generous applause when he was replaced midway through the second half – continued to suggest he may yet win a regular England place.The blameless victim of a tactical tweak, Downing, too, found himself withdrawn – but not until, courtesy of an odd fabulous cross and pass, he had revived memories of his early pomp at Middlesbrough, when he was regarded as one of England's finest young talents.Rodgers is big on the importance of coaching and Henderson's and Downing's double renaissance represents an impressive endorsement of his skill in this department. Significantly, their revivals also indicate a new-found willingness to compromise on the part of a manager who, at Swansea, was so slavishly addicted to a carefully choreographed, short-passing possession game that you initially wondered whether Gerrard would have a place in his Merseyside blueprint.The way Liverpool now punctuate an already varied passing range with some accurate long deliveries of the sort that would warm Sam Allardyce's heart suggests Rodgers has learnt to value pragmatism. This flexibility suits Henderson and Downing while offering Coutinho and – when not suspended – Luis Suárez a suitable framework on which to construct their personal challenges to Manchester's and London's finest.David Moyes – who may or may not be at Everton next season – has long been a tactical pragmatist but, whereas his extremely low budget, heavily set piece reliant side are surely operating at their maximum level, Liverpool possess much more in reserve.The heady 19th-century days when this city – one of the British Empire's foremost international trading ports – exceeded London in wealth and had a US consulate established may never return. But Rodgers's team are not necessarily in terminal decline.EvertonLiverpoolLouise Taylorguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     The author of this week’s cover article answers questions about how her son’s illness informed her reporting, and where the field of food allergy research is heading.In nominating Gina McCarthy to head the E.P.A. and Ernest J. Moniz for the Energy Department, President Obama showed his intent to use all the tools at his disposal to tackle climate change. The latest document dump from WikiLeaks reveals the diplomatic high wire the United States is often walking in its relationship with countries that are considered crucial allies in fighting terrorism, such as Pakistan. An internal Obama administration assessment concludes that the U.S. government has provided $4 billion in aid to Haiti since 1990 but "struggled to demonstrate lasting impact," according to a summary of the review, which has not been publicly released. You’re invited to a live cooking conversation with Julia Moskin of The New York Times and the cookbook author Nigella Lawson. Morrissey was stricken with pneumonia this week forcing him to postpone a gig in San Francisco and c[...] Attempts to fail a baseline test to make postconcussion tests look better have reached youth sports, medical professionals say.     Do you think people under the age of 18 are mature enough to make life-or-death decisions on their own? Which of these things do you think constitute life-or-death decisions? Why?     Bacchus Capital Management, co-founded by Sam Bronfman II, is providing financing and expertise to small winemakers.     U.S. stocks posted the first back-to-back weekly rally of the year after the Federal Reserve said it would buy $1 trillion in bonds and after a report showed home construction snapped the longest streak of declines in 18 years. Alumnus Roger Lewis has had — and continues to have — a pretty remarkable career, as full of unexpected turns as a novelistic page-turner. The story began in Houston in the 1950s — a place he knew, by the time he was in his mid-teens, that he would eventually leave — natural vitiligo treatment download to Massachusetts when MIT offered him a full scholarship directly out of high school. He headed for Cambridge with plans to become an engineer, a mathematician or a scientist but by the middle of his sophomore year he was ready to drop out, convinced that he didn’t want to be any of those things but not at all sure what he did want to do.In an attempt to help him find his direction, the dean of students asked him the obvious question — What do you like to do best? — and the answer just fell out of him: ‘Draw’. So the dean suggested he consider looking into architecture. "I didn’t even know how to spell it," he says now. "But I ambled over to Building 7 and had a look around at all the drawings and models and I thought — you mean you can get credit for this?" So he signed on and began his bachelor's in architecture in his junior year.Read the full story Miroslaw Balka’s sculpture at Gladstone resembles a giant industrial device and makes an allusion to Michel Foucault. President Obama pressed for Libya’s help in finding the attackers whose assault led to the previous envoy’s death. Borrowing from microfabrication techniques used in the semiconductor industry, MIT and Harvard Medical School (HMS) engineers have developed a simple and inexpensive way to create three-dimensional brain tissues in a lab dish. The new technique yields tissue constructs that closely mimic the cellular composition of those in the living brain, allowing scientists to study how neurons form connections and to predict how cells from individual patients might respond to different drugs. The work also paves the way for developing bioengineered implants to replace damaged tissue for organ systems, according to the researchers. “We think that by bringing this kind of control and manipulation into neurobiology, we can investigate many different directions,” says Utkan Demirci, an assistant professor in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST).Demirci and Ed Boyden, associate professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at MIT’s Media Lab and McGovern Institute, are senior authors of a paper describing the new technique, which appears in the Nov. 27 online edition of the journal Advanced Materials. The paper’s lead author is Umut Gurkan, a postdoc at HST, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.‘Unique challenges’Although researchers have had some success growing artificial tissues such as liver or kidney, “the brain presents some unique challenges,” Boyden says. “One of the challenges is the incredible spatial heterogeneity. There are so many kinds of cells, and they have such intricate wiring.”Brain tissue includes many types of neurons, including inhibitory and excitatory neurons, as well as supportive cells such as glial cells. All of these cells occur at specific ratios and in specific locations. To mimic this architectural complexity in their engineered tissues, the researchers embedded a mixture of brain cells taken from the primary cortex of rats into sheets of hydrogel. They also included components of the extracellular matrix, which provides structural support and helps regulate cell behavior.Those sheets were then stacked in layers, which can be sealed together using light to crosslink hydrogels. By covering layers of gels with plastic photomasks of varying shapes, the researchers could control how much of the gel was exposed to light, thus controlling the 3-D shape of the multilayer tissue construct. This type of photolithography is also used to build integrated circuits onto semiconductors — a process that requires a photomask aligner machine, which costs tens of thousands of dollars. However, the team developed a much less expensive way to assemble tissues using masks made from sheets of plastic, similar to overhead transparencies, held in place with alignment pins.The tissue cubes can be made with a precision of 10 microns, comparable to the size of a single cell body. At the other end of the spectrum, the researchers are aiming to create a cubic millimeter of brain tissue with 100,000 cells and 900 million connections. The new system is the first that includes all of the necessary features for building useful 3-D tissues: It is inexpensive, precise, and allows complex patterns to be generated, says Metin Sitti, a professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. “Many people could easily use this method for creating heterogeneous, complex gel structures,” says Sitti, who was not part of the research team.Answering fundamental questionsBecause the tissues include a diverse repertoire of brain cells, occurring in the same ratios as they do in natural brain tissue, they could be used to study how neurons form the connections that allow them to communicate with each other.“In the short term, there's a lot of fundamental questions you can answer about how cells interact with each other and respond to environmental cues,” Boyden says.As a first step, the researchers used these tissue constructs to study how a neuron’s environment might constrain its growth. To do this, they placed single neurons in gel cubes of different sizes, then measured the cells’ neurites, long extensions that neurons use to communicate with other cells. It turns out that under these conditions, neurons get “claustrophobic,” Demirci says. “In small gels, they don't necessarily send out as long neurites as they would in a five-times-larger gel.”In the long term, the researchers hope to gain a better understanding of how to design tissue implants that could be used to replace damaged tissue in patients. Much research has been done in this area, but it has been difficult to figure out whether the new tissues are correctly wiring up with existing tissue and exchanging the right kinds of information.Another long-term goal is using the tissues for personalized medicine. One day, doctors may be able to take cells from a patient with a neurological disorder and transform them into induced pluripotent stem cells, then induce these constructs to grow into neurons in a lab dish. By exposing these tissues to many possible drugs, “you might be able to figure out if a drug would benefit that person without having to spend years giving them lots of different drugs,” Boyden says. Other authors of the paper are Yantao Fan, a visiting graduate student at HMS and HST; Feng Xu and Emel Sokullu Urkac, postdocs at HMS and HST; Gunes Parlakgul, a visiting medical student at HMS and HST; MIT graduate students Jacob Bernstein and Burcu Erkmen; and Wangli Xing, a professor at Tsinghua University.The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Paul Allen Family Foundation, the New trademiner download Cell Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Institute of Engineering and Technology A.F. Harvey Prize, and MIT Lincoln Laboratory. For many of us, the food-mood link feels very real – but some say it's just in the mind. Still, surely it can't hurt to ditch the trans fat-laden junk food and sugar from our dietsFeeling tetchy? Itching for a scrap? Maybe it's something you ate? I have long believed in "food swings"– ply me with sweets and jam puddings and I'm a different person to my salad-eating alter ego. It's not so much a sugar rush, like the ones that some parents of small children testify to (and which the jury is still out on), but more of a sugar slump.A growing body of research indicates that what we eat may affect how angry we feel. Yet, for many, the food-mood link still has an aura of quackery. One recent University of California study showed that "greater trans fatty acids were significantly associated with greater aggression," says lead author and professor Beatrice Golomb. "Trans fats interfere with omega three metabolism" – and apparently, the brain's neurons need these essential fatty acids to keep us bright and snappy. Lack of omega three has already been linked with depression and antisocial behaviour, and according to some experts, it seems many of us post-industrialists have woefully omega-three-deficient diets.It's not exactly "eat a sausage roll; punch someone", but down to "patterns of eating". Another study indicated that when levels of the brain chemical serotonin dip, from stress or not eating, it affects the brain regions regulating anger, potentially resulting in "a whirlwind of uncontrollable emotions".So why is the food-mood link not more widely accepted? Sketchy evidence, say some scientists. Correlation does not prove causation, for one thing: there's a good argument that someone feeling cheesed off may be more likely to pig out on trans-fat-loaded junk food in the first place. Then there's the contradictory flow of nutritional research, which, thanks to, ahem, "simplistic media coverage" pull us in confusing directions. Take one study that claimed to show that people who plumped for an apple instead of chocolate were more likely to be drawn to violent films. Apparently, exerting self-control led to feeling, well, a bit wound up.This, of course, puts you in a tricky position. Succumb and eat the sugary snack laced with bad fats and you're hopping mad; resist the urge, eat a carrot instead and you still feel angry. It's an impossible call, and probably accounts for my rather over-complicated personal life. Interestingly, the researchers advise companies to capitalise on this rage by: "advertising anger-themed movies and video games next to healthy food aisles". Talk about spreading the love.All of this, of course, proves that life is bigger than randomised controlled studies. And that, according to Oxford University's Dr Alex Richardson, who runs the charity Food and Behaviour Research, is precisely why the food-mood case isn't more embraced. "We know the UK diet that is wrecking our bodies is also bad for our brains. We have quite enough evidence, but the scientific community insist on 'randomised controlled double-blind placebo trials' – hard to do, particularly for long periods. Instead, we should look at the totality of evidence."Artificial trans fats, she says, are particularly pernicious – "research suggests they react with drugs such as repeated amphetamines, increasing the psychotic effects." If you think that won't be a problem for your family, she adds that: "We give very low doses of amphetamines to children with ADHD, in the form of Ritalin." Banned in Denmark, Austria and New York restaurants – with speculations they led to drop in NY crime (the so-called "Twinkie effect") – trans fats are, somewhat bafflingly, still legal in this country, despite being linked to cardiovascular disease and having their use questioned by Nice.The government however insists on a voluntary approach, pointing to the fact that many major retailers no longer use these fats. "Businesses have already voluntarily reduced trans fats in foods by a third," says a Department of Health spokesman, which sentiment is echoed by the Food and Drink Federation: "Trans fatty acid consumption has fallen from 2.1% of total energy in 1985 to an estimated 0.7-0.8% in 2011 … well below the maximum WHO recommendations. At current levels, they do not pose a health risk.""This totally misses the point," says Richardson. "There are many people who are still eating loads of trans fats – anyone with a junk diet, including our most vulnerable. Walk down any deprived high street and there will be countless fast-food outlets still using trans fats."Richardson also points to sugar – fast becoming public enemy number one. "Prison studies suggest that many inmates have poor blood sugar control, compounded by a high-sugar diet. We all know how it feels when blood sugar drops – we feel moody, foggy. Apply that to someone from a disturbed background."So far, so depressing. So what should we be eating instead – for optimum perkiness? Oily fish, naturally. Oxford criminologist Bernard Gesch found that giving prison inmates a multivitamin and fatty acid supplement led to violent offences dropping 37% compared to 10% for those who were given a placebo – findings that were confirmed by a later Dutch study. Richardson advises a Mediterranean-style diet, while people eating more fruit and veg report feeling calmer, happier and more energetic.So oily fish, a Mediterranean diet and ample portions of fruit and veg – exactly the diet that is medicine for our bodies is medicine for our brains too. Weird, that. Or not.NutritionNutritionHealth & wellbeingFood & drinkRebecca Hardyguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     After weeks of negotiations and intrigue, Doc Rivers has officially left the Boston Celtics for the Los Angeles Clippers.     The measure puts an end to most cases of so-called libel tourism, in which powerful foreigners have brought cases against authors, journalists and others.     The line of thunderstorms stretching from Albany to Washington over the weekend showed once again how broken the nation's air system is, according to travelers and activists. Before Haiti and international donors can rebuild this devastated city, they must first destroy it. All the news and gossip from Tuesday night's event, as Dishonored wins best game7.00pm: Kingsley Amis said that awards are just fine if you happen to win one. If that's the case then, by the end of this unseasonably warm London evening, tinnitus miracle download and shakers in the video game industry will be drunk on the BAFTA judging panel's anonymous validation, while a great many more losers will be necking warm champagne and cursing the absurdity of it all. For those of us without an Epona in the race, it's an opportunity to relax and observe the clash of artistry, ego and criticism that this sort of award event entails – the vigorous handshakes of the victors, the rictus smiles of the trounced, the woozy inebriation of just about everybody else. Held almost a month to the day after its elder and more well-to-do brother, the film BAFTAs, it's also an opportunity for the video game industry to feel as if it's earned its place as the fourth pillar of modern entertainment alongside literature, music and cinema. Sure, a 'V' is yet to swipe its way into the academy's acronym (BAFTVA? BAVTFA?) and tonight's event is held at the London Hilton hotel, while last month's jamboree occupied the rather more opulent Royal Opera House, but every attempt has been made to ensure the video game industry doesn't feel as though it sits at the children's table of awards ceremonies. Irish comedian and hobbyist game player Dara O'Briain will host the awards for the fifth year running while the walking-wounded retailer GAME has provided "support" (canapés? Offcuts of red carpet?) in the capacity of Official Supporter. The nominations for this year's Awards include no fewer than 53 games, from Blockbuster behemoths (or should that be dinosaurs?) such as Activision's Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 and Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed III through to independent creations such as Thomas Was Alone and Sony's The Unfinished Swan. 2013 also marks the introduction of a new award category: Best British Game in a bid to convince ourselves that the UK is definitely still a viable place to make video games - despite the existence of Canada and its endless tax breaks for game makers (and the syrup perks). In some ways this Best British Game award exemplifies the current tussle at the creative and commercial heart of the industry. Three of the six titles nominated for this inaugural award are independent creations, self-funded by their creators (Dear Esther, The Room and Super Hexagon) while the others are hefty, multiplatform blockbusters (Forza Horizon, LEGO: The Lord of the Rings, Need for Speed Most Wanted). It's an impossible award to judge, of course. How to set Dear Esther's bleak Scottish vistas against Forza Horizon's high contrast take on Colorado's deserts? What better exemplifies British-ness: LEGO: Lord of the Ring's curious mash-up of Danish plastic and Oxbridge fantasy fiction, or the twitch cruelty of Terry Cavanagh's Super Hexagon? One thing is certain: the essence of what makes a game British is not easily defined. Potentially the biggest winner of the night will be California-based Thatgamecompany, whose PlayStation 3 title Journey – a gentle parable on religion and death - is nominated in eight categories, including that of Best Game, where it must fend off the likes of Mass Effect 3, FIFA 13, Far Cry 3 and Dishonored using only a cloak and scarf. In truth awards ceremonies – regardless of whether you win or lose - are neither 'fine' nor nonsense. The reality sits somewhere in between: here is a night to celebrate an industry that is steadily diversifying, maturing and finding new voice and range. The 53 nominees represent different points and corners of a creative space that widens each year. Taken as a whole, tonight's BAFTAs offer a splendid celebration of the achievements of a great many creative minds. Bravo. But now our attention must turn to the bickering and spittle of specifics – the playground squabbling over whose game could beat the other' guys game up in a fight. The BAFTAs are also great for that. So ready the popcorn and adjust your sights for sniping. Let the games commence.7.53pm: The guests are gathered, the red carpet worn and the video game Baftas will commence in just over an hour. Luminaries already spotted include Valve co-founder, Gabe Newell (Half-Life, Portal, Team Fortress, Steam) who will be accepted into the academy fellowship later this evening. Randy Pitchford, co-founder of Gearbox is also in attendance, although we've been told he won't be answering any questions about his latest game (which stifles any questing reporter hoping to ask which bits of Aliens: Colonial Marines Pitchford and his staff actually developed). The guests are currently quaffing and banqueting. Meanwhile, the press room is awash with Mountain Dew and Doritos in the contemporary hospitality style.7.59pm: Predictions? The main award 'Best Game' is a close-run affair with Dishonored, Far Cry 3, FIFA 13, Journey, Mass Effect 3 and The Walking Dead in the running. Let us know which title you hope will win in the comments (in the contemporary style). If you'd like to Tweet about the awards then Bafta is pretty eager that you use the hash tag #BAFTAGames.We'll be back in just an hour to talk you through the names and titles written on the inside of the envelopes.9.07pm: And we're off! Dara O' Briain takes to the stage and opens by expressing his dismay at continually being asked to defend video games in the role of 'token' game playing celebrity. But he's happy as tonight he had a proper 'gamer' chat on Sky News about how annoying it is to be shot by German teenagers over the internet in Call of Duty.9.09pm: O' Briain warning developers against the origin story. It's overdone in Hollywood, he says and, while Tomb raider look wonderful, he doesn't need to see Mario's "gritty" beginnings as an out-of-work plumber.O' Briain happy to see a slew of new awards in this year's game Bafta, but is sad that there's no category for the poor person tasked with writing the collectible letters and diary pages scattered throughout endless blockbuster game levels.9.15pm: Fittingly, the first award of the night is for Best Debut Game. It's a strong category, from the bleak highland inscrutability of Dear Esther through to the engines-roaring-in-a-Texan-accent ebullience of Forza Horizon to the lazily cleansing wonder of Ed Key, David Kanaga's Proteus.The nominations for this first award are: · Deadlight· Dear Esther· Forza Horizon· Proteus· The Room· The Unfinished Swan9.16pm:And the winner is Sony's The Unfinished Swan, a game in which you throw black paint into a white world in order to reveal the objects therein. A worthy winner.9.19pm: The second award of the night is for Original Music. Of course, aquaponics 4 you review score for Thatgamecompany's Journey made history in December as the first video game work to win a Grammy - will the Bafta Journey agree with the Americans?The nominations are:· Assassin's Creed III· Diablo III· Journey· Thomas Was Alone· The Unfinished Swan· The Walking Dead9.19pm: Yes. Yes they will. Journey takes the award and a tearful representative from Sony Music picks up the award on Wintory's behalf.9.24pm: Next award is for Story, presented by Rhianna Pratchett, lead writer on the latest Tomb Raider, released today. A diverse set of nominations here, from the blocky love story simplicity of Mike Bithell's Thomas Was Alone through to the grand, universe-saving spectacle of Mass Effect 3 (complete with its fan-baiting conclusion).Nominations are:· Dishonored· Far Cry 3· Journey· Thomas Was Alone· Mass Effect 3· The Walking Dead9.24pm: And the award goes to The Walking Dead, Telltale's six part, episodic universe expansion of the Robert Kirkman graphic novel.9.29pm: Boris Becker takes to the stage to introduce the award for 'Sports/ Fitness'. Does motorsport count as a sport? What about if it's motorsport in a desert and you're in a race to escape Skrillex who's possessed your car stereo? Hmm. Whether or not (the admittedly excellent) Forza Horizon quite qualifies for the 'Sports' category is a question for an earlier time.Wonderful to see New Star Soccer, the independently-created iOS by Simon Reed nominated. That we currently live in a world where a bedroom coder can go up against the financial might of EA and its annual FIFA franchise is a good thing.· FIFA 13· F1 2012· Forza Horizon· New Star Soccer· Nike+ Kinect Training· Trials Evolution9.31pm: And that we live in a world in which an indie sports game created on a shoe-string budget like New Star Soccer can beat the multimillion dollar behemoth of FIFA is (despite the latter game's considerable achievements) even greater.9.35pm: Next up: the award for game innovation. From the PlayStation Move-controlled Wonderbook: Book of Spells (the Harry Potter game that turns your Move controller into a 'wand' with which to spunk magic over the pages of an old tome peripheral) through to, er, Black Ops 2 this is the award to celebrate invention (a far better word than innovation, wouldn't you agree?).· Call of Duty: Black Ops II· Fez· Journey· Kinect Sesame Street TV· The Unfinished Swan· Wonderbook: Book of Spells9.36pm: And the award goes to The Unfinished Swan, the second of the night for Giant Sparrow's visually-arresting debut.9.38pm: If the award for 'Artistic Achievement' was given to the game that allowed users to best express their artistry then surely it should go to Zynga's flash-in-the-pan phenomenon Draw Something? Many a majestic cock passed through their servers during the fortnight that we all played that game. But the Academy appears more interested in games that reflect the artistic achievement of their creators. Cowards! Anyway! The nominees for 'Artistic Achievement' are:· Borderlands 2· Dear Esther· Far Cry 3· Halo 4· Journey· The Room9.40pm: The Bafta goes to Journey! Pro-tip for aspiring developers out there: principally spend your budget on modelling sand. Excellent New Yorker Robin Hunicke is here to collect the award! She's not wearing an elongating scarf, sadly, but her dress is terribly sparkly. Probably too sparkly for the PlayStation 3 to accurately render, what with it's attention being spent primarily on sand and stuff, which explains the cloaks in that game probably.9.45pm: Next up it's the online browser category, which was labelled the 'Social' category in 2012, I believe. Nominees for this award are:· Amateur Surgeon Hospital· Dick and Dom's HOOPLA!· Merlin: The Game· Runescape· The Settlers Online· SongPop9.47pm: SongPop takes this one, a Facebook game in which you challenge friends and strangers to be the first to identify the songs playing at any given time.9.47pm: Ian Livingstone takes to the stage to introduce the BAFTA Ones to Watch Award in association with Dare to Be Digital"You're so lucky to be in the games industry right now," he says. Is that supposed to be encouraging or threatening? TURN TO PAGE 93 TO FIND OUT ETC.Nominees are:· Pixel Story· Project Thanatos· StarcrossedAnd Starcrossed take this one. Good work, chaps.9.55pm: Now the award for 'Game Design'. A strong category (and probably the one that the right sort of game developers hoped they'd be nominated for). Also, the first appearance for the wonderful XCOM (Advance Wars through a 1980s sci-fi glass).· Dishonored· Borderlands 2· Far Cry 3· Journey· The Walking Dead· XCOM: Enemy Unknown9.55pm: This award goes to Journey. I guess the panel was super into JUMPING and WIND. I would have gone for XCOM which is about SHOOTING and PERIL but hey-ho.9.57pm: Now to the strategy award and it's XCOM's second chance to prove itself. But, what's this? DARK SOULS? Oh goodness. Our collective hearts are torn.· Dark Souls: Prepare To Die· Diablo III· Football Manager 2013· Great Big War Game· Total War Shogun 2: Fall of the Samurai· XCOM: Enemy Unknown9.59pm: And the award goes to XCOM! Such a deserving winner. It's a game full of strategy and aliens in suits and, even though there's a bunch of guns involved (and guns are definitely not a core value of The Guardian and its readership) it's also a game about redemption and tactics and chess in space armour so we are very much happy about getting fully behind this one.10.03pm: Ah! The family award. This should probably go to Monopoly every year till the end of all time but as Monopoly didn't first come out in 2012 (wait, did Monopoly: Prepare to Die edition come out in 2012?) we'll have to make do with one of the following:· Clay Jam· Just Dance 4· LEGO Batman 2: DC Super Heroes· LEGO the Lord of the Rings· Minecraft: XBOX 360 Edition· Skylanders Giants10.06pm: Admittedly Traveller's Tales had an unfair advantage there what with having two games nominated and also LEGO involved in their titles, but even so, LEGO: Batman 2 is a deserving winner regardless.10.09pm: Randy Pitchford takes to the stage to introduce the award for audio achievement. Did you know that Randy is a magician? Hey Sega, you should totally ask to see his best trick. OH WAIT YOU ALREADY DID.Ahem!Nominees are:· Assassin's Creed III· Beat Sneak Bandit· Dear Esther· Far Cry 3· Journey· Halo 410.13pm: And the winner is Journey! Woah. Thatgamecompany just keeps winning. Did you know that Journey took three years to develop? Kudos to Sony for catching the vision and funding the developer through to fully realising its ambitions.10.13pm: A lady from forex growth bot here to present the nominees for best Mobile game. LittleBigPlanet Vita would be a worthy winner here as that game is wonderfully suited to the hardware. The nominees are:· Incoboto· LittleBigPlanet (Vita)· New Star Soccer· The Room· Super Monsters Ate My Condo· The Walking Dead10.17pm: But the award goes to The Walking Dead, a game I would recommend you play from the comfort of a sofa rather than the crimped window of the iPad on the lap.10.18pm: Now we turn to the award for 'Performer'. I *think* this refers to 'voice actor' but 'performer' has a wonderfully Shakespearean frisson about it, so let's go with Bafta's definition.The nominees are (although I wouldn't be surprised if Nolan North actually voiced all of them):· Adrian Hough (Haytham) - Assassin's Creed III· Danny Wallace (The Narrator) - Thomas Was Alone· Dave Fennoy (Lee Everett) - The Walking Dead· Melissa Hutchinson (Clementine) - The Walking Dead· Nigel Carrington (The Narrator) - Dear Esther· Nolan North (Nathan Drake) - Uncharted: Golden Abyss10.24pm: Danny Wallace wins! Fun fact: the writer of Yes Man! once wrote for a Sega magazine back in the 1990s. In some ways Wallace is the anti-Charlie Brooker (who worked on a PC games magazine back in the 1990s).10.24pm: Now we turn to the award for best multiplayer. All of the games in this category are deserving, but this is the category that I think Journey should take.· Assassin's Creed III· Borderlands 2· Call of Duty: Black Ops II· Halo 4· Journey· Need For Speed Most Wanted10.25pm: The award goes to Journey. This is the category in which Thatgamecompany's game provides true invention. One of its creators, Jenova Chen, said last year: "None of us was born to be an asshole. I believe that very often it's not really the player that's an asshole. It's the game designer that made them an asshole. If you spend every day killing one another how are you going to be a nice guy? All console games are about killing each other, or killing one another together... Don't you see? It's our games that make us assholes." "The reason we wanted to create Journey besides reaching that cathartic moment in the end was to create a real connection between two people. The reason I do that is because most people are saying right now: social gaming is hot. But no other game is really socialising, as in the emotional exchange between two humans. In almost all games the only exchange between two players is bullets or numbers."Journey is a game in which the online component is intended to encourage co-operation and anonymous connection and in this regard, it breaks good and true ground.10.31pm: Now it's time to turn to the award for British game. Not the game that best embodies Britishness (croquet? cricket? cluedo?) but the best game made by a Brit. A difficult award to judge this. The nominees are: · Dear Esther· Forza Horizon· LEGO: The Lord of the Rings· Need for Speed Most Wanted· The Room· Super Hexagon10.34pm: And the winner is: The Room, an iOS puzzle game that's heavy on atmosphere and light on scarves.10.35pm: Next up is the award for Action game, a category so broad it's impossible to feel out its boundaries. Action is the primary verb of the entire medium. An un-actioned game is a game unplayed, right? Semantics! Still, sifting through the nominees, it appears as though 'Action' is being used to describe games with guns and explosions. Like, fortissimo guns and explosions. Nominations for the award are (presented by a man from The Only Way Is Essex who, I believe, provided motion-capture data for Master Chief in Halo 4): · Borderlands 2· Call of Duty: Black Ops 2· Far Cry 3· Halo 4· Hitman: Absolution· Mass Effect 310.38pm: Far Cry 3! This is a game full of exploding barrels and sharks so it makes a lot of sense that it won the award for Action.10.42pm: And finally. The award for 'Best Game' (spoiler: it's Tetris). Danny Wallace takes to the stage to announce the nominees:· Dishonored· Mass Effect 3· FIFA 13· Far Cry 3· Journey· The Walking Dead10.46pm: And the award for Best Game goes to: Dishonored.The team from Arkane Studios bound onto the stage. The game's set designer Viktor Antonov (architect of Half-Life 2's City 17) thanks his wife and apologizes to the British for the game's Americanized spelling. Whoops and glory.10.48pm:The evening is almost entirely uncoiled. Jonathan Ross flicks an over-conditioned fringe as he welcomes Valve's Gabe Newell to stage in order to accept the award for the Academy Fellowship as a result of his lifetime's work in video games.Gabe is self-effacing ('apologies I am not eloquent, apologies I am not wearing a tuxedo') but entirely sincere as he thanks both the players and the academy for the accolade.10.51pm: What? Half-Life 3 will be released in time for Christmas?10.54pm: Oh no wait. That's the white wine talking, not Gabe. Gabe has gone home to Seattle. Gone home to strut the halls of Valve Software topless, wearing only his Bafta award as a gold mask, while his denizens feed him grapes squeezed through the eye socket while building the game platform of the future.11.04pm: Which, um, seems like a good point at which to wrap things up. Thank-you so much for hanging out with us in the press room at the 2013 game Baftas. What lessons can be learned from this year's ceremony? That short games about religion, sand and wind that are entirely devoid of fighting will win the lion's share of Bafta game awards? Yeah, let's go with that, if only to see how this revelation affects the new Call of Duty.11.06pm: Till next year: good night.GamesGaming awardsEventsSimon Parkinguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The best images from Anfield as the 220th Merseyside derby takes place. The match is the Liverpool defender Jamie Carragher's last against Everton before he retires     Have low-back pain? Ever had it? Want to avoid it? Okay, that covers all of us, so listen up: The muscles of the lower back are designed more for stability and less for power or acceleration (unlike, say, the quadriceps). Thus, you want to choose back exercises that promote endurance, not brute strength. The regional government said it would support Pescanova, an insolvent fishing company that has become the latest casualty of the Spanish debt

  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 1:33 AM

    The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index gained for a third week in a row, pushing it toward the biggest monthly advance since 1991, after a government plan to rid banks of toxic assets and improving economic reports ignited a rally. Despite strategic gains, anti-government fighters continue to struggle.'We don't believe that you should have to pinkify something to make it acceptable for girls,' says Alice TaylorFor many people, 3D printing is still a thing of science fiction. Less a tangible technology and more a reason to shout "They're printing 3D guns now? Endtimes! ENDTIMES!", slap on some tin-foil and run for the nearest bunker.Yet there are people building businesses out of this, which although innovative, disruptive and all those other words you have to use in these cases, are also proper, down-to-earth businesses.MakieLab is one of them. Based in London, the company raised its first seed funding in August 2011 to work on prototype 3D-printed dolls – Makies – which customers would be able to design themselves on its website.That site launched in alpha in May 2012, the company raised $1.4m from early-stage investors in June that year, and now in March 2013 MakieLab has released an iPad app called Makies Doll Factory to help people make and order Makies from their tablet."We started with the question of whether virtual goods could produce physical goods," explains co-founder and CEO Alice Taylor. "Would 3D printing mean we could make virtual crates and barrels into real crates and barrels? The short answer was yes, but nobody was going to buy a crate or a barrel…"Hence dolls, based on Taylor and her three co-founders' love of online avatars, and also the fact that dolls were the biggest category in the toys market – and a blissful lack of awareness about how difficult they'd be for a 3D-printing startup."An eminent industry figure said to me a year in 'You do realise that was the hardest choice to make, don't you?'," laughs Taylor. "YES I DO NOW, thank you very much. But we've done it!"Rooting for the underdogNot that MakieLab is a dolls company: Taylor says it's more of a software manufacturing platform that can output 3D-printed shapes, including dolls but in the future other kinds of products."The dolls are product number one, but we want to produce toys and games – or toy/game combos – that are really carefully targeted towards specific consumer groups," she says. "Makies are for girls aged 8+, but our second product may be for boys. Not that girls won't want to play with it too, or boys with Makies."When MakieLab raised its $1.4m of early-stage funding, there was a notable outpouring of warmth from fellow startups. That's partly because the four co-founders were well-connected in the London startups scene and beyond, but Taylor thinks there were other reasons."I think part of it came from people seeing a company doing something frankly quite weird, new and very experimental, with two women and two men in the four founders, at a time when people tended to picture startups as being three skinny guys from Stanford," says Taylor."So it was partly people going 'Wow! Underdog, that's amazing', and partly natural vitiligo treatment download as encouraging anyone else who's got interesting new ideas, sees those skinny Stanford boys and thinks 'I'm never going to get into this startup scene'. And of course, you can."Makies may have initially launched as a website, but mobile was in mind from the start. MakieLab used the Unity game engine to ensure its making tools would transfer elegantly to mobile devices – something that also means porting the new iPad app to Android will happen sooner rather than later.In the two days since the iPad app was released, people have made more than 4,500 Makies with it – created them in the app, if not actually paid for real versions. Taylor says that already, iPad users are more "much more engaged" than website visitors in their usage of the creation tools.Mobile game plansMakieLab is already working on a separate Makies-themed mobile game to be released this summer, which will be selling digital goods rather than physical dolls. Taylor says that the company is thinking hard about how this will work though, to ensure parents are comfortable with whatever in-app purchase model is used."The game will be similar to the app, in that you're creating characters in a maker-space, but that space will now expand a bit, and you'll be able to make things other than just the character. You'll be making clothes and accessories, and harvesting materials to make them," says Taylor.Something that I like about MakieLab both as a geek-journalist and a parent is the way it encompasses both digital and physical play: virtual and real dolls. This blending of digital and physical play seems like an important trend, especially if you watch how children seamlessly move between the two worlds given the chance.It's a view not shared by some commenters when I've written about children's apps on this blog, who grouch that kids should be playing outside with physical toys, not using apps on touchscreens – as if this is an either/or choice."Exactly! It's not either/or: kids will do both," says Taylor. "They'll play on-screen, then go outside and play with their friends, and often the screen will be in their pocket while they're playing with their friends, or their friends will be with them when they're playing on-screen. This is all just blended now."This debate was actually the spark that created MakieLab back in 2010, when Taylor was at a digital conference in New York that was co-located with a toy fair – with some crossover in delegates between the two.As one of the digital speakers was taking questions, someone from the toy industry asked "All this screen business is all very well, but don't you want kids to go outside and play with a hoopla stick?"As this question rattled around her head, Taylor wandered the toy fair, and realised how completely separate the toy and digital entertainment industries were."It was all plastic products made far away in China, completely separate from the content creation happening there in America," she says. "It just felt so weird. How could we make it blend better?"Digital loves physicalThis isn't to say people who work almost exclusively in digital entertainment don't love a trademiner download In fact, something I've noticed a lot is that people I met who spend their days subsumed in digital content often have sprawling vinyl, book or toy collections at home.Taylor has noticed it too. "I think it's a symptom!" she says, noting that people who are heavily involved in digital may have a heightened sense of how intangible it is."I started making websites in 1994, but now I basically can't see any of my work from then through to around 2003. It's been rewritten, archived or gone offline and disappeared," she says. "Digital people feel that in their bones: we know that if we don't take screenshots and make photographs of them to frame and hang on the wall, we can't guarantee anyone will see this in the future. And of course, we all love toys. Toys are amazing."Well, some toys. Another interesting thing about Makies and 3D-printed toys more generally is their removal of gender barriers. Boys can make girl dolls, girls can make boys, and (with apologies to Blur) they can come up with something they really love without worrying whether the box is pink or khaki.That's not quite the case in the traditional toy industry. Taylor laughs heartily while telling me about Hasbro's plan to make Nerf appeal to girls by making a pink crossbow called the Nerf Rebelle Heartbreaker, for example."It takes a brave parent to walk down the boys aisle in a shop to buy a giant gun for their daughter, or walk down the girls aisle to buy their son a doll. It basically doesn't happen. Your radical lefty Guardian reader, yes, but for the most part no," says Taylor."We don't as a company believe that you should have to pinkify something to make it acceptable for girls, or khakify it for boys. We don't want to start saying 'You're a boy, you can't put a skirt on that doll'. Whoever the kid is, they should be able to make boy and girl dolls."3D-printing disruptionMakieLab isn't just trying to disrupt the traditional toy industry on gender lines, of course. 3D printing itself could be seen as a big threat to those aisles full of toys, although also a big opportunity if their manufacturers embrace it.Has the toy industry been sniffing around MakieLab? "Strangely, I don't know if they've noticed us yet," says Taylor."They haven't been in touch. The games industry has, journalists, trade shows, museums and even a makeup company has been in touch, but no toy companies yet. I don't know if it's on their radar, although of course it could be, and they might be plotting to kill us right now! We haven't heard from them."She goes on to stress that of course 3D printing is on the toy companies' radar – for their own internal prototyping processes if nothing else – and predicts that in 5-10 years most manufacturers will be using it commercially. But there are barriers."The question is whether as businesses they are prepared yet to start to look at it for production. It's expensive compared to stuff made in China, and political too if you're a giant company who's been manufacturing tinnitus miracle download for 15 years," she says."It's where all your people, machines, systems and logistics are, and it's the world you understand. So when some upstart comes along and says you should be 3D-printing in London now… I suspect that is the barrier. There will be plenty of emerging-tech types in toy companies saying this is part of the future, but as a big company it takes a long time to change course."The local-manufacturing point is potentially important. MakieLab currently makes its dolls in London and Amsterdam, with ambitions to widen its manufacturing network as more 3D-printing facilities become available in the years ahead.That's why Makies are expensive compared to more-famous doll brands – they start at £59.99 for a basic model, with the skin colours, clothing and accessories costing extra. Explaining the difference is a political discussion, by necessity."We like our cheap goods, yet at the same time, we have these cheap goods because there are people in China who'll work for 20 dollars a week," says Taylor. "Everybody knows that is fucked up, and it will change. The minimum wage went up 20% last year in China, and it will go up again."Distributed networksMakieLab's hope is that when the placement of 3D-printing facilities around the world is evenly distributed, production will be easier for the company and others like it.Taylor also makes an interesting parallel with this future manufacturing network: "It'll make a distributed network of manufacturing machines, and that's how the internet started: it was a distributed network," she says. "That's amazing, but we're not there yet with 3D printing."Hence the £59.99 starting price for a Makie doll, which Taylor says leaves "very small margins" for MakieLab, although she hopes to improve them over time as the business scales up – ultimately bringing the price including extras under £50, and ideally under £40."It's an inevitability that prices will come down, but how fast? Nobody really knows," she says. "That's very exciting, but that's also what keeps me up every night at 3am. I could do with slightly less excitement, thank you very much! But it is amazing being in this mix of industries, where every month there's a new development."Is 3D printing heading for a fall though? There's such a lot of hype and noise around it at the moment, and that whiff of science fiction – I write this as someone who loves the genre – that may be provoking an exaggerated backlash from sceptics, and inflated expectations from supporters.Taylor quotes Gartner's famous hype cycle theory for emerging technologies. "3D printing is right at the top of the peak of inflated expectations, before the trough of disillusionment," she says."For some people, the trough will be 'Why can't I print my own kidneys?', and it's going to be a really big trough for people who are thinking that we're going to start 3D-printing houses on the moon next week. But for us, it will be something like 'Why isn't the price coming down as fast as we thought it would?'. And then the price will come down."3D printingAppsiPadTablet computersMobile phonesSmartphonesToysTechnology startupsStuart Dredgeguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated aquaponics 4 you review rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Widespread coal use in the north has led in recent decades to an average decrease in life span of more than five years, research indicates.     Memphis forward Tarik Black is transferring to Kansas and will be eligible to play immediately.     Hugo Chávez’s death appeared to be welcomed directly and indirectly by some top figures in American politics in Washington, but some statements celebrated aspects of his leadership in whole or in part. Barry Zito knew it was time to test the curveball. “The Staircase 2: Last Chance” is Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s sequel to his eight-part documentary “The Staircase,” an examination of a sensational murder trial in Durham, N.C. In a week when Apple reported a rare profits drop, we meet two former Apple high-flyers to get a glimpse into this most enigmatic of tech companies. Guardian technology editor Charles Arthur meets Peter Tamte founder and CEO of theory.io to discuss his rival to Evernote, Projectbook.io and his crucial year at Apple in 1998 when he was hired by the late Steve Jobs.And Guardian digital correspondent Jemima Kiss meets the newly appointed CEO of Good Technology Corporation Christy Wyatt to discuss the importance of mobile technologies to all industries and the lessons she learned when working forApple.Also we learn about a new European focused tech start-up fund, the Twilio Fund which is open for applications. Jemima meets co-founder and CEO Jeff Lawson to find out more. If you want to apply to the fund, go to their website, twiliofund.com.Charles ArthurJemima KissJason Phipps     George Lucas, Herb Alpert, Allen Toussaint, Renée Fleming and Tony Kushner are among this year’s recipients of the National Medal of Arts. National Humanities Medals will go to Marilynne Robinson, Kay Ryan, Anna Deavere Smith and Joan Didion, among others.     The government’s announcement that the police had arrested traders in eastern China brought to light one of the more alarming cases of tainted food in the country.     It isn't clear where the focus lies in Pablo Trapero's drama about priests trying to save a sprawling Buenos Aires slumThe Argentinian film-maker Pablo Trapero has always brought muscular confidence and flair to his work, and White Elephant is no exception, a movie about faith and hope to which the new papal election has given an arrowhead of relevance. It is set in the Villa Virgin barrio, the toughest shantytown in Buenos Aires, a grim place dominated surreally by the gigantic ruined TB hospital built in the 1930s; now a deserted wreck and cathedral of poverty known as the "white elephant" where the homeless camp and drug-dealers ply their trade. (It looks, to me, creepily like the CeauÈ™escu presidential palace in Bucharest.) Two priests work tirelessly to help the people there: Father Julián (Ricardo Darin) and his new younger Belgian colleague, Father Nicolás (Jérémie Renier), who believes in actively mediating drug wars. Julián thinks this will only contaminate and compromise their priesthood, and is listening to his superiors who are asking him to promote the cult of Father Carlos Mujica, the local Marxist priest who was forex growth bot life) killed there in 1974. And meanwhile, Nicolás is beginning to fall in love with social worker Luciana (Martina Gusmán). For me, the focus of the film is too diffuse: is the implied spiritual dimension of the story merely a symptom of poverty? Or does it have an authenticity that transcends everything? And does the division between Nicolás and Julián imply an urgent moral choice? Or are they just two approaches undertaken in equally valid good faith? A flawed drama, but one with emotional power.Rating: 3/5DramaWorld cinemaguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The bride is a research associate at the American Institutes for Research; the groom is a law student at Boston University. Police officers visited tight end Aaron Hernandez’s house in Massachusetts on Tuesday after a body was found Monday in an industrial park about a mile away.     MLS seeks its fourth consecutive all-star victory over a European foe in preseason training when the All-Stars host West Ham United in Toronto. An emerging battle over a proposed free-trade agreement with Colombia is undercutting central pieces of President Obama's trade agenda, with key lawmakers urging swift enactment of a U.S.-Colombia deal even though the administration says the pact needs more work. The District's political elite squeezed into an atrium in the John A. Wilson Building yesterday to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the beaux-arts style structure -- at once a symbol of the city's federal control, its longtime struggle for autonomy and most simply, an awesome display of craftsmanship. ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Kevin Anderson scored 22 points and Richmond beat three-time defending champions Temple 58-54 in the semifinals of the Atlantic 10 Conference tournament on Saturday. In early-20th-century America, two powerful men were engaged in a contest to possess the world’s most remarkable watch.     A late own goal from Phil Jones secured Chelsea a 1-0 victory at Manchester United on Sunday to leave the Londoners poised for a top-four finish and a Champions League place next season.     Redemption was sweet for Los Angeles Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick as he rebounded from what he assessed as two sub-par performances with a flawless display against the St. Louis Blues.     As the hulking passenger jet approached London's busiest airport after a long flight from China, the inexplicable happened: Both of the plane's engines sputtered and essentially died. Townie A Memoir By Andre Dubus III Norton. 387 pp. $25.95 If you've ever been harassed or hurt by a bully, if you've ever dreamed of revenge, if you've ever crossed the line from dreaming to hitting back and felt a rush of relief and joy as you punished your enemy, then you're going to find a lot... Q. My 86-year-old mother cannot get rid of her paid-in-full timeshare. The maintenance fees are hurting her financially. She has tried to sell and/or donate it to a charity without any luck. How can she dispose of it? Do we, her beneficiaries, have to take it over? Can she just stop paying the

  • noenati
    on 2013/12/15, 1:30 AM

    President Obama announced today that he will fulfill his pledge to address climate change by regulating carbon emissionsIn his state of the union speech this February, President Obama vowed,If Congress won't act soon to protect future generations, I will. I will direct my cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take, now and in the future, to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy.President Obama followed through on that promise today, unveiling a climate action plan that includes measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, accelerate renewable energy permitting on public lands, and prepare American infrastructure for the impacts of climate change. The centerpiece of the plan is the announcement that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, in addition to the rules already in draft form that are set to regulate emissions from new power plants. The White House released a video to explain the importance of these steps in addressing climate change by decarbonizing the economy.Republican House speaker John Boehner reacted to this news by calling the EPA regulations "absolutely crazy." However, in reality they're required by law.Under the Bush Administration, the EPA refused to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. The state of Massachusetts sued the EPA, and the case went all the way up to the US supreme court. In 2007, in a 5-4 decision with Justice Anthony Kennedy casting the deciding vote along with the four more liberal justices, the court ruled that if greenhouse gases were determined to endanger public health or welfare, the EPA would be required to regulate their emissions in accordance with the Clean Air Act.The Bush EPA delayed the decision about the threat of greenhouse gas emissions until after he left office. After President Obama took office, the EPA issued its endangerment finding in 2009. Based on an evaluation of the best available scientific evidence like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and US national climate assessments, the EPA determined that greenhouse gas emissions clearly endanger public health and welfare via their impacts on climate change.This finding meant that under the Clean Air Act, greenhouse gases meet the definition of "air pollutants," and the EPA would have to regulate their emissions from mobile and stationary sources (vehicles and power natural vitiligo treatment download emissions were regulated via new fuel efficiency standards requiring cars and light trucks to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The newly announced power plant emissions are the EPA's enforcement of the Clean Air Act requirements for stationary sources.On the one hand, with Congress refusing to implement any sort of climate legislation, regulating emissions from vehicles and power plants is the biggest single step President Obama can take to reduce American greenhouse gas emissions. He could have followed the Bush administration's strategy and tried to delay these regulations, forcing environmental groups to sue to make the courts require that the EPA enforce the law. On the other hand, that is really all the Obama administration is doing – enforcing the law. Any opposition complaints that this decision is "crazy" or bypassing Congress are factually and legally wrong.In fact, if Republicans want to eliminate these regulations, all they need to do is pass climate legislation to supersede them. A growing number of conservatives support implementation of a carbon fee and dividend system, for example. At the moment the majority of Republicans in Congress seem to deny that climate change is human-caused and/or a problem, and oppose taking any steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are now only two options available to them – let the government regulate greenhouse gas emissions, or pass climate legislation. Philosophically, Republicans generally oppose government regulations and support free-market solutions like carbon pricing; however, it appears that congressional Republicans would rather force the Obama administration to regulate emissions and then accuse them of "killing jobs", as Speaker Boehner already has. On the contrary, studies have shown that EPA regulations generally have a modestly positive impact on the economy and jobs. A national study by the University of Massachusetts at Amherst also found that every dollar invested in clean energy creates two to three times as many jobs as putting that same dollar into coal, oil, and natural gas.Ultimately the Obama administration deserves credit for implementing these greenhouse gas regulations in a timely manner rather than delaying as the previous administration did. His emphasis on the importance of decarbonizing the economy to address the threat of climate change in a comprehensive climate action plan is a major step towards addressing the threat of climate change. It's also important to remember that these regulations are required trademiner download and if congressional Republicans don't like them, they should propose a better solution of their own.Climate changeCarbon emissionsClimate change scepticismClimate changeBarack ObamaObama administrationJohn BoehnerDana Nuccitelliguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Swedish House Mafia — the disc jockeys and producers Axwell, Sebastian Ingrosso and Steve Angello, of Stockholm — came to the Barclays Center on their “One Last Tour.”Provisional figure, which includes 'opportunity costs' for police, well below £10m suggested by some in mediaLady Thatcher's ceremonial funeral with full military honours cost the taxpayer an estimated £3.6m, Downing Street has said.About £500,000 was spent on the service at St Paul's Cathedral, a reception for guests at Mansion House, and the printing and circulation of invitations to the congregation of 2,300 guests.The provisional figure includes £2m "opportunity costs" for police who would have been on other duties on the day. A further estimated £1.1m was spent on providing additional security and policing for the ceremony and funeral procession from the Palace of Westminster to St Clement Danes, the RAF chapel in the Strand, where Thatcher's coffin was transferred from a hearse to a gun carriage and then given a military escort to the cathedral.The scale of the funeral for Britain's first and only female prime minister was for a politician second only to Sir Winston Churchill's state funeral in 1965. It was attended by the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, leading politicians and guests drawn from about 170 countries.Her family are understood to have paid for the funeral flowers and the undertaking costs. No figure has been released for those.The Cabinet Office said that the ceremonial costs of £500,000 also included costs incurred by the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign Office. The department is collating the final total of all public money spent and the confirmed figures are to be published before the summer recess, but are not expected to be vastly different to the estimated costs released on Thursday. The amount is considerably less than the £10m figure which had been suggested by some in the media.More than 4,000 police officers were deployed in a huge security operation on the day of the funeral, on 17 April, two days after the Boston marathon bombings. Fears of tinnitus miracle download and disruption were not realised and there were no arrests.Six police forces from outside London sent specialist officers to help with escorting foreign dignitaries.Following the funeral service, Thatcher's close family and friends, led by her daughter Carol, son Mark and his two children, attended a private cremation at Mortlake crematorium in south-west London.Thatcher died on 8 April, aged 87, following a stroke while sitting in bed reading in the Ritz hotel suite she had been staying in while recuperating from a bladder operation.Margaret ThatcherLondonCaroline Daviesguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     Daniel Nava hit a two-out single in the top of the 10th inning to score pinch-runner Jackie Bradley Jr., and the Boston Red Sox rallied from a four-run deficit for the second time in a four-game series to beat the Seattle Mariners 8-7 in 10 innings on Thursday.     Readers solve the mystery of a 23-year-old woman with a terrible headache who kept getting worse.     Move over, male models. The face of men’s fragrance is now a leading man from the big or small screen.     In Milan, many designers reworked the suit while Miuccia Prada pondered the notion of paradise.     Residents at Alwyn Court were told that they would have to leave their homes once again next weekend while the crane atop the tower One57 was repaired.     The bride is the executive assistant to the artistic director of the Public Theater in New York; the groom is a vice president at Credit Suisse.     The Times launches a new column on global warming and energy. U.S. stocks fell last week, sending the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index to a three-month low, on growing uncertainty over European leaders' plans to halt the debt crisis and economic data that raised doubts about the strength of the economic recovery. Talks with the musicians, who went on strike on Wednesday, mainly over wage issues, broke down on Sunday evening. Ben Hope and Laura Dreyfuss will succeed Steve Kazee and Cristin Milioti in the musical’s lead roles. Statement posted on jihadist website says attacks were 'first phase' as Iraqi wing of al-Qaida regains strengthAl-Qaida has claimed responsibility for a wave of bombings and suicide attacks that killed about 60 people on the 10th aquaponics 4 you review the US-led invasion that ousted Saddam Hussein.Islamic State of Iraq, the country's al-Qaida wing, is regaining strength and has carried out dozens of high-profile attacks since the start of the year.On Tuesday car bombs, roadside explosions and suicide attacks hit mainly Shia districts and security forces in Baghdad and other cities."What has reached you on Tuesday is just the first drop of rain, and a first phase, for by God's will, after this we will have our revenge," said an al-Qaida statement posted on a jihadist website late on Tuesday.Sunni Islamists see Iraq's Shia-led government as oppressors of the country's Sunni minority and target Shias to try to provoke a sectarian confrontation like the inter-communal slaughter that killed thousands in 2006-7.Since January suicide bombers have struck at a rate of nearly twice a week, the worst for several years.Iraq's sectarian and political rivalries are still raw and its power-sharing government – split among Shia, Sunni and Kurdish factions – has been all but paralysed by disputes for more than a year.The conflict in nearby Syria is stirring up Iraq's volatile mix, exposing the country to the rivalry between Turkey, which backs Sunni rebels fighting President Bashar al-Assad, and Iran, which sponsors him.Iraqal-QaidaMiddle East and North Africaguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The North American porcupine Photo: Mike Cuccarese Memorable black commanders in chief have been harder to come by on the big screen, and as with their real-life counterparts, they get their way only some of the time.     The Missoni company announced on Thursday that the wreckage of the small aircraft carrying Vittorio Missoni had been discovered in the waters north of the resort of Los Roques.     The people tapped by Hugo Chavez to carry on his socialist revolution seem to be improvising the rules of governing as they march toward what most Venezuelans consider certain victory in a mid-April vote to replace the late president. Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering research scientist Michael Short '05, SM '10, PhD '10 is an exemplar of interdisciplinary knowledge, with Institute degrees in both nuclear science and engineering and materials science and engineering. “Interdisciplinary work is where the fun stuff is; it’s where you forex growth bot work on challenges that many people consider too difficult, or that require a broader perspective,” he says.But there’s another dimension to Short’s interdisciplinary skill set — extensive hands-on metalworking experience, which amplifies the value of his academic learning and his ability to address challenging problems in fission reactor development.“In my freshman year, I started Course 22 and took a blacksmithing class. I’ve stayed with both ever since,” says Short, who is also a staff member at the Institute’s cross-departmental Uhlig Corrosion Laboratory. “The combination has led me to many advances in the research realm. You can theorize about a part or a model, but if you’ve held a piece of hot steel in your hands, you’ll have better insight into how it will behave. You pick up intuitive knowledge; the combination of that and book knowledge is worth more than the sum of the parts.”For this reason, Short takes his students in class 22.033, Nuclear Systems Design, beyond books and paper. “The students heat-treat metal using the forge in Building 4, and see how an improperly treated piece becomes brittle and breaks apart, while a well-treated one stays tough and strong,” he explains. Short has also abandoned laser pointers in class, instead using a different reactor part each week as a visual aid. This gives students a tangible sense of what they’re studying and working on — a challenge with nuclear reactors.Read full article Bundesliga minnows Freiburg are in contention for a Champions League spot but coach Christian Streich is already planning next season's relegation battle as his players are lured away by bigger clubs.     Edward J. Snowden was scheduled to depart Moscow on a flight bound for Cuba, but several reporters said they did not see him on the plane.     A thriving black market in sea cucumbers — sluglike marine animals considered a delicacy in China — has set off a maritime gold rush up and down the Yucatán Peninsula. MARYLAND'S BID to impose a nickel fee on paper and plastic bags fell victim last year to election-year jitters. Lawmakers didn't want to go near anything that had a whiff of a tax increase. But sponsors of a bag tax, buoyed by the success of the District's effort and by important support from Gov.... MOGADISHU, Somalia - A medical official says 13 people died in mortar attacks in Somalia's

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